What about the Swedish military? - Page 2




 
--
 
September 27th, 2004  
godofthunder9010
 
 
Sweden and other European nations may not "deserver" the US coming to help them as you say. It'll happen anyways. The US will come to Sweden's assistence if they were invaded by Russia. That's just how the US is.
September 27th, 2004  
eric013
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by FlyingFrog
On the individual base of unit base, Sweden army units are simply among the best in the world, no doubt about it.

But sorry to say, Sweden is too small, therefore is almost meaningless in the world military podium (I am really sorry to say this, but it is so).
I would disagree, we make a difference ESPECIALLY on a global scale:

- I think that the Swedish soldiers presently serving in the irish rapid reaction unit in monrovia, liberia makes a difference.

- I think that the Swedish soldiers that ran the airport of Kindu, Kongo during 2003, thereby enabling the whole UN mission in that country (since their infrastructure is destroyed) made a difference.

- I think the battalion of Swedish soldiers that, since 1999, have served in the Kosovo mission and enabling the safety of civilians in that region, as well as running one of the 4 divisions during last year, have made a difference.

In addition we have, or have recently had personnel serve in Afghanistan, Eritrea/Ethiopia, Georgia, India/Pakistan, Korea, Sierra Leone, Sudan, and East Timor.

I can keep going...
September 27th, 2004  
eric013
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by godofthunder9010
Sweden and other European nations may not "deserver" the US coming to help them as you say. It'll happen anyways. The US will come to Sweden's assistence if they were invaded by Russia. That's just how the US is.
Well, not simply "how the US is". It is how the US defends it's interests. There is no charity in international relations.

What nation state deserves to get help anyways? Name me one government that hasn't lied, cheated and manipulated on numerous occasions.

Still the issue is moot since Russia has no reason to invade Sweden, nor barely any gasoline to complete such a venture.

The economic ties in the baltic region have strengthened exponentially in the last 15 years. It is basically bad politics and economics to have overt conflicts in the region. Remember, IKEA is doing very well in Moscow, and European funds are investing heavily in Russian industry.
--
September 27th, 2004  
A Can of Man
 
 
A Swedish friend of mine who just finished his service says Sweden's army doesn't even have a professional NCO corps. It's all recruits or officers. So you can forget about their infantry.
Then again Sweden doesn't really need a strong military as long as it has allies that have them. Plus they're good about preserving their neutrality.
September 27th, 2004  
KJ
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by the_13th_redneck
A Swedish friend of mine who just finished his service says Sweden's army doesn't even have a professional NCO corps. It's all recruits or officers. So you can forget about their infantry.
Then again Sweden doesn't really need a strong military as long as it has allies that have them. Plus they're good about preserving their neutrality.
Yeah well that means exactly diddely squat since we have a completely different system over here.

Lower ranking officers have the role that you over there have given to your NCO,s.
Ask your friend where he served his time, was he a conscript soldier or an officer?
Inquiering minds wantīs to know.

Sweden have NO allies that will defend our soil, thatīs what neutrality is all about you know.
However we being true to our commitment to the UN have personel helping with the cleaning up/pulling security in Afghanistan for one.

The UN missions mentioned above is more peacekeeping then direct action missions, the units doing those missions are unexperienced but have a good reputation.
As far as I have heard atleast.

The only units in the Swedish arsenal with real world combat experience concists of only officers.
No need for NCO,s on those Teams.

ARTEMIS ring any bells?

KJ.
September 27th, 2004  
A Can of Man
 
 
Ahh okay. I stand corrected then.

He served as an NCO actually but was comissioned 2nd Lieutenant when he left. He did artillery.
Well Sweden is neutral but there are unofficial allies. If Sweden was under actual threat, I'd imagine most of Europe and the US would flock to its aid. Just this is unneccessary because Sweden's chances of being stuck in a real conflict is just about floating on zero.
September 28th, 2004  
eric013
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by KJ
The UN missions mentioned above is more peacekeeping then direct action missions, the units doing those missions are unexperienced but have a good reputation.
As far as I have heard atleast.
Actually quite a large percentage of the NCOs and privates have a number of missions already on their roster, which means in addition to 10 to 15 months of conscription service they have anywhere from 1 to 3 years of UN/NATO experience. I doubt many of the US infantrymen in Iraq right now exceed that since many are pulled from the reserve and national guard (anyone having served there, feel free to share your views, and I will stand corrected).

Quote:
The only units in the Swedish arsenal with real world combat experience concists of only officers. No need for NCO,s on those Teams.
I think that the guys who served in the first Kosovo contingent for Sweden '99-'00 would disagree. They were regularly under fire, and had considerable psychological problems upon return home since the UN were completely unprepared to face the Serbian resistance and brutality that was encountered; including a siege of a school where Swedes played defence. Just about a year ago the Swedish battalion worked side by side with the US division during the Kosovo riots, a number of privates were wounded there as well.

Indeed SSG (our company sized special forces contingent consisting only of officers) have seen the most action, recently in africa as a part of a french unit, but this should not discount the very hostile conditions many of the volunteer non commissioned soldiers have to endure.
September 28th, 2004  
A Can of Man
 
 
I think there's a big difference between Peacekeeping missions and actual combat in Iraq. Peacekeeping missions are often sitting around getting shot at and not being allowed to do anything other than sit around or surrender. Poorly run and organized... probably a textbook case of how not to run military operations.
Being said, I think it is one heck of a hard task. But you really don't learn a whole lot about fighting when you aren't really allowed to fight.
September 28th, 2004  
sunb!
 
 

Topic: Swedish army


My experience with the swedish army is only positive. We worked closely with the swedish battalion in Kosovo and had a couple of liason officers and soldiers during operations in our camp and AO - no problems whatsoever and the work they did was respectful by all means.

I once read that if the former Soviet Union attacked or invaded Norway or in Central Europe, Sweden would allow NATO forces to use Swedish territory for launching attacks as well as joining NATO troops in the battle. (Cannot remember where and when but it was a topic discussed during the 1980s and early 1990s )

Sweden is also a genial country considering the useage of roads for combat airfields! (The same with Norway and the many short runway airfields allowing F16s to land and take off on just 800 meters (yes it can be done.)).

If someone pulled a trick on Scandinavia I guess the Swedes would not sit on the fence watching but getting heavily involved; history reveals you don't mess with scandinavians
September 28th, 2004  
KJ
 
 
Indeed Sweden wouldnīt stand idely by while scandinavian neighbours were attacked.
Ofcourse there have been plans for NATO reinforcements of Sweden if we ever came under attack.

I didnīt mean to belittle the job done by the peacekeepers on either the first or any other Bosnia or Kosovo missions (or any other UN mission).

I still stand by my statement that real COMBAT experience is sparse in these units, while some Teams have plenty of it.


//KJ.