Reasons for Iraq War - Page 4




 
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March 17th, 2004  
Redneck
 
 
I must thank you for honoring us with your words of wisdom and vast wealth of experience even though you do find the discussion boring.
March 17th, 2004  
diplomatic_means
 
Ok its not boring anymore. The Eastern seaboard blackout honestly had nothing to do with terrorism and this has nothing to do with this topic. So I will finish this post and you can delete it due to its irrelevance to the topic or you can set up a new thread where this will fit in. I am a part of the Institute of Electronics and Electrical Engineers (IEEE). At my local chapter meeting a few months back we had one of the head engineers of one of the power grids invovled in the blackout come and explain exactly what happened in the blackout with voice transcripts of phone calls, computer printouts, powerpoint, the whole 9 yards. Now what happened to the best of my ability to remember and explain was the fact that two generators were down for routine repair. That means all the other generators contributing to the power grid are required to pick up the slack. So far everything is normal and routine. this is right before peak power usage time, when the power being generated needs to be the most. So a little before the blackout a tree limb cathces a powerline and they have to shut off the power going through that line and re route it so it can be fixed. Everything is still routine. But the problem begins when the power is rerouted the generator it is rerouted to is now being overworked so the system shuts it down before it damages the generator. The bad thing about this is it is a very very large capacity generator so now you have tons of other generators trying to make up for the loss of this big one. Another thing about power transmission is you can't send too much power through powerlines or else they overheat and sag and the power companies will now how much they are saggina t any given time. Now when these other generators start trying to make up for the loss of this huge one the powerlines begin to overheat and sag they begin to get caught in trees and what not and more powerlines have to be shut off. In a matter of minutes you have a massive blackout. Now why did it affect the Eastern seaboard? The power being supplied all over continental America is shared. the power grids and companies are connected together through networks. except for Texas. The lonestar state wnated to be independent of all the other power networks. So Texas has one power network. So when one network begins to fail, so do others. Luckily the entire US was not affected because other networks west of the seaboard just cut off the connections they have to the other networks or burdened their generators just enough to fight the blackouts move westward without taking themselves out. Now will you please trust the word of someone who is actually in the field?
March 17th, 2004  
Redneck
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by diplomatic_means
Now will you please trust the word of someone who is actually in the field?
When they submit a valid argument, yes I will. I am abnormally adverse to accepting the words of those with credentials that I am unsure or unaware of without these supporting arguments. Kind of in the nature of a discussion, eh?

Carry on.
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March 17th, 2004  
Janie
 
I lived in Niagara Falls at the time of the blackout. I also lived there when it was put on the top ten list of possible terrorist targets. You CAN'T live there and not know people who work for the Niagara Power Authority. They heard the tree reasoning too. They also heard a lot of other excuses that the Government was giving for that occurance..including the lightening strike. I am not a reactionary. If it was tree limbs it would have been disclosed. If it was two shut downs it would have been disclosed. Not days of other reasons guessed at first. If you don't know what it is that caused it, how can you definitively state that's what caused it?

Mr. Diplomatic_means, I am degreed in the science field. This topic interests me. I don't think that a condescending profession of boredom to stir things up was very diplomatic at all. We are not all so jaded that these things don't still affect us, and it is in human nature to discuss things until it is no longer needed.
March 18th, 2004  
RnderSafe
 
 
^ I like her .. 8)
March 18th, 2004  
diplomatic_means
 
I am just reporting what an engineer how works for one of the power grids involved said happened. He was actually present and working as things went to chaos. He watched everything happen. He had voice transcripts of phone conversations happening between his engineers and those of other power grids. I don't know how much proof you need but what he presented is stuff the government was not covering up and it was stuff that the government could not fabricate. The rarity of such an event happening like it did the engineer stressed was ridiculously small. But things lined up just perfectly on that one occasion for all of it to happen. He explained everything that went on technologically to a room full of engineers. I don't see reason to argue over what he had to say because any other reason that someone could give could not possibly be as well explained, documented and presented as what this engineer told us. This warning I'm about to give is for EVERYONE to take to heart. I have learned the hard way in debates with liberals that conservative conspiracy is just as bad as liberal ignorance. Research every side to every argument even if it is blatantly biased. Sometimes you can learn something from the most outlandish things and often you can be screwed for taking everything at face value.
March 18th, 2004  
Janie
 
I am neither liberal nor consevative. Merely a Patriot. My issue is not with the proof you presented, but the derision of those with a need to discuss it.
March 18th, 2004  
SHERMAN
 
 

Topic: Ok.


Ok, 2 things:

1)This is off topic! If this continues, it should be under" The Eastern seaboard blackout" in chit chat, or somthing.
2)Please keep it civil.