"No One Left Behind"




 
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February 21st, 2004  
Rev. Dan
 

Topic: "No One Left Behind"


Good Afternoon to all! What an honor to post on forum that is decorated with some many heroes that have served so faithfully!

I am a pastor doing a sermon on warfare and am needing some help. I am looking ofr the history of the concept of "No One Left Behind". We all see this concept on movies such as We Were SOldiers and Black Hawk Down.

IF anyone has any help on this, tht would be great!

Again thank you to al who have so greatly served and honored our country by giving their all!

May God Conintu to Bless and Up Hold your HonoR!

Dan Lewiston
February 21st, 2004  
GuyontheRight
 
Good Day Rev,

I think know the concept goes back to the Ranger Creed, written in 1974 by Commadn Sergent Major Genrty, but it probobly goes back farther. Heres the Ranger Creed, Hope I could be of Help!

Quote:
Recognizing that I volunteered as a Ranger, fully knowing the hazards of my chosen profession. I will always endeavor to uphold the prestige, honor and high "esprit de corps" of my Ranger Regiment.

Acknowledging the fact that a Ranger is a more elite soldier who arrives at the cutting edge of battle by land, sea, or air. I accept the fact that as a Ranger my country expects me to move further, faster and fight harder than any other soldier.


Never shall I fail my comrades. I will always keep myself mentally alert, physically strong and morally straight and I will shoulder more than my share of the task whatever it may be. One hundred percent and then some


Gallantly will I show the world that I am a specially selected and well trained soldier. My courtesy to superior officers, neatness of dress and care of equipment shall set the example for others to follow.


Energetically will I meet the enemies of my country. I shall defeat them on the field of battle for I am better trained and will fight with all my might. Surrender is not a Ranger word. I will never leave a fallen comrade to fall into the hands of the enemy and under no circumstances will I ever embarrass my country.


Readily will I display the intestinal fortitude required to fight on to the Ranger objective and complete the mission, though I be the lone survivor.
February 21st, 2004  
Redleg
 
 
Hello Dan, welcome to the forum.

That was a very interesting question..

"No one left behind" has been been a military philosophy for a long time, it's much older than the Ranger creed, but it's a good start since it has primarily been used within SOF units. (I believe).
I'll try to do some research on this subject, and see if I can find some older references to it other than the creed.

Anyone else here who knows??
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February 21st, 2004  
Puff1082
 
Sir, I believe the "No One Left Behind" concept has been in existance a long time if not in those exact words. It is of the idea based on the brotherhood among those serving together. It is of an honor shared, a promise given.
I did not see combat while serving in the USN but I am a professional firefighter and the concept is true here also. We have a saying in the fire service, "You go, I go". I will not abandon you willingly. If I cannot get you out alive then I will come back for you. You WILL be recovered and proper honors given.
I hope this ahas been of some help.
February 21st, 2004  
RnderSafe
 
 
Quote:
I am looking ofr the history of the concept of "No One Left Behind".
Greetings, Reverend.

This is a difficult question. The philosophy of "No Man Left Behind" has been around since the beginning of warfare, but not on the level to which it is practised today. Americans, in general hold life to a much higher standard than much of the world (this is a generality, so of course I'm painting a broad brush). There are many accounts of units during the Revolutionary War, Civil War, WWI, WWII, Korean War .. adhering to this philosophy, but it didn't really seem to catch on until the Vietnam war, and even then, it was typically something the Commander instilled within his troops. Redleg is correct that it has primarily been a philosophy within SOF units, mainly because they are typically small and have an extreme bond with each and every man. While Americans have always seemed to go back and collect their dead, bringing them home to rest on American soil really didn't take off until VN. (Might I add, we are still working to bring those lads home from VN)

The Ranger Creed is a good example to use to get the point across. In the Regt. we adhered to it strictly, each man knows it backwards and forwards, but most importantly, not only does he know it, he believes in it.

The philosophy espouses a concept that no matter what happens, you will be taken care of. This helps to form a tight, cohesive unit .. knowing your brothers will be there for you, no matter what. Life or death.

Quote:
It is of the idea based on the brotherhood among those serving together. It is of an honor shared, a promise given.
Puff nailed it on the head.
February 21st, 2004  
SHERMAN
 
 

Topic: yes


I think it developed by itself.Good cohesive units took care of every last of their man, and along time it became a concept....Its natural...Who would fight in a unit that wont make sure you get home, one way or another...Brotherhood is one of the foundations of a good army...
March 2nd, 2004  
Rev. Dan
 

Topic: The Rev. Thanks you all!


As soon as I get this sermon together, I will post it for all of you! Thank you for the insight and history!

Again I look forward to getting to know some of you via this forum! Thank you!

If you all ever need anything please don;t hesitate to let me know! Email, post or what have you!
January 13th, 2013  
slax
 
I lead this with a disclaimer that I respect the implementation of the ideal represented here in the utmost through all forms of extreme engagement which risk life and limb for an ideal, in this forum those serving in the military specifically..

entomoligically in many history's mythology, this is an idea that goes back to the point of the origin of compassion for those of a similar plight, adopted in past and recent wartime to relate the common understanding of compassion for those closest to the cause/idea/self of the words spoken. While there are other historical records of ideas similar I bring the one which I have the most mythological and philosophical background and understanding of to the table as a historic reference to "all before one" or "no one left behind"

http://www.tamqui.com/buddhaworld/Avalokitesvara

"Mahayana account

According to Mahayana doctrine, Avalokiteśvara is the bodhisattva who has made a great vow to listen to the prayers of all sentient beings in times of difficulty, and to postpone his own Buddhahood until he has assisted every being on Earth in achieving nirvana. "
January 13th, 2013  
SGT G
 
 
There is a much simpler place that this can be found now days. I know this is not as old as the Ranger Creed, but it does hold very special meening to every soldier and is instilled in them from the first day they reach Basic Combat Training:
The Soldier's Creed
I am an American Soldier.
I am a warrior and a member of a team.
I serve the people of the United States, and live the Army Values.
I will always place the mission first.
I will never accept defeat.
I will never quit.
I will never leave a fallen comrade.
I am disciplined, physically and mentally tough, trained and proficient in my warrior tasks and drills.
I always maintain my arms, my equipment and myself.
I am an expert and I am a professional.
I stand ready to deploy, engage, and destroy, the enemies of the United States of America in close combat.
I am a guardian of freedom and the American way of life.
I am an American Soldier
I wanted to make sure this made it into the discussion because it is something that every soldier serving in the Army today knows and lives by.
January 17th, 2013  
LeEnfield
 
 
If a chap is dead then we could see little point in losing more life's just to bring the body back. What ever happened to that body it could never harm him any more, but to lose another half a dozen men just to bring a body back is a no brainer, you either value life or you don't.