Foreign Military - Page 4




 
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January 20th, 2005  
03USMC
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by paratroopa
lol, green berets is a nickname yet the official name of an american unit, similar to the navy seals but much stronger and more elite

man, ur american, i thought u would know ur own units better than i do
Negitive. There is not A US unit whose Offical name is Green Berets. Green Berets are the head gear worn by US Army Special Forces, civvies refer to SF Operators as Green Berets.
January 20th, 2005  
A Can of Man
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Big_Z
Are Americans the ones who came up with the designation "Ranger"? I know allot of countries use it and i'm just curious if it is after the US Rangers.
I believe so. I think the term actually goes way back to the colonial days even. A distinctly American thing that has spread around the world.

Quote:
Originally Posted by paratroopa
lol, green berets is a nickname yet the official name of an american unit, similar to the navy seals but much stronger and more elite
And how do you prove this? You can prove they're very good but you can't prove one is better than the other.
January 20th, 2005  
RnderSafe
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by paratroopa
lol, green berets is a nickname yet the official name of an american unit, similar to the navy seals but much stronger and more elite

man, ur american, i thought u would know ur own units better than i do
Unless I see your military credentials vastly grow within the next 24hrs to include service with every SOF unit in the world .. stow your comments on who is better or more elite.
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January 20th, 2005  
r031Button
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Big_Z
Are Americans the ones who came up with the designation "Ranger"? I know allot of countries use it and i'm just curious if it is after the US Rangers.
Some commonwealth nations have units with Ranger in their name; it's not actually a representation of their skill or role however. Case in point, I may be in the Rocky Mountain Rangers; but I am in no way the equivilant of a US Army Ranger.
January 20th, 2005  
Big_Z
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by r031Button
Quote:
Originally Posted by Big_Z
Are Americans the ones who came up with the designation "Ranger"? I know allot of countries use it and i'm just curious if it is after the US Rangers.
Some commonwealth nations have units with Ranger in their name; it's not actually a representation of their skill or role however. Case in point, I may be in the Rocky Mountain Rangers; but I am in no way the equivilant of a US Army Ranger.
It seems like allot of countries like to call their high speed guys "Airborne Rangers".
January 21st, 2005  
r031Button
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Big_Z
Quote:
Originally Posted by r031Button
Quote:
Originally Posted by Big_Z
Are Americans the ones who came up with the designation "Ranger"? I know allot of countries use it and i'm just curious if it is after the US Rangers.
Some commonwealth nations have units with Ranger in their name; it's not actually a representation of their skill or role however. Case in point, I may be in the Rocky Mountain Rangers; but I am in no way the equivilant of a US Army Ranger.
It seems like allot of countries like to call their high speed guys "Airborne Rangers".
It's kind of like how the Belgians, Brits, and other nations have Commando's not simply special forces. Though int he case of Rangers there is alot of historical prescendant; case in point the Queens York Rangers (1st American Regiment) trace their history back to the American War of Independance.
January 21st, 2005  
AlexKall
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Big_Z
Are Americans the ones who came up with the designation "Ranger"? I know allot of countries use it and i'm just curious if it is after the US Rangers.
Many units in Sweden are translated to Ranger units, in other words their name.

And is most likely either british or american
January 21st, 2005  
A Can of Man
 
 
Well UK and Belgians using "Commando" for non Special Forces type of units isn't out of the ordinary. Remember that special operations started off as what are now more commonly considered Ranger missions.
The SAS in World War II was more reminiscent of today's US Army Rangers than of today's SAS. The SAS evolved into a modern SF unit, while the Belgian Paracommandos, who's symbol is identical to the SAS because of its history of being founded as an SAS unit, continued to serve the role that it traditionally played in World War II while a seperate SF unit was created.
January 21st, 2005  
EuroSpike
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by AlexKall
Quote:
Originally Posted by Big_Z
Are Americans the ones who came up with the designation "Ranger"? I know allot of countries use it and i'm just curious if it is after the US Rangers.
Many units in Sweden are translated to Ranger units, in other words their name.

And is most likely either british or american
We got our own an non of them are translated to rangers but it is easier name Laskuvarjojääkäri, Fallschirmjaeger as airborne ranger to explain what is it. Usually finnish terms can be translated straightly to german and swedish but not to english.

Sissi is straightly translated as guerilla and sissikomppania as guerilla company, but what does exactly mean the term "guerilla"? Is it a soldier or something like iraqi insurgents?
January 21st, 2005  
Big_Z
 
 
Guerilla warfare is simply using small groups of men to attack and harass the enemy. It can be devastating to morale and if done properly can be very effective against an enemy. Take Iraq for example, men with 0 training and low quality weapons are racking up allot of kills on the US military. Imagine if it was a highly trained unit like the Rangers doing these guerilla attacks. The Korean war is a perfect example. Rangers would go against overwhelming numbers and cause massive amounts of damage against the enemy while taking few if any losses at all using these tactics.