That 38 Year Deserter V2.




 
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September 4th, 2004  
WilsonMatthewDavid
 

Topic: That 38 Year Deserter V2.


I figured some rational conversation could still be had about this deserter who is going to be brought back to America soon..

For those of you who don't know about this, there is limited data in the first one:Here

I really don't want to hear how you think he should die, how he should be tortured, or anything of the sort, also.. Please avoid cursing as it might get us locked like the previous one.

Simply say in a simple, and calm manner if you think he should get the death penalty or not, and if his Japaneese wife should be allowed to be there in his last moments.

Once again, I'm asking very nicely for you all to keep your civil manners, act as if a ten year old was in the room reading as you type, Would you? I asked for RedNeck's permission on this, and he said Okay as long as you all keep it good and well mannered.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Facts
The Japanese government has arranged for a US Korean War Deserter who has lived in N. Korea for some 40 years to have a reunion with his Japanese wife in Jakarta. The former soldier did not want to leave N. Korea to a country where he could be extradited back to the US to face charges.
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For those of you who don't know, Jenkins -- 38 or so years ago, abandonded America during the N. Korean war, and now he is going to be extracted to be put on trial for cowardous in a United States Military Court.
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Koizumi raised the issue with President Bush last month and got sympathy but no concessions.

Secretary of State Colin Powell was also firm.

"The Japanese are approaching this as a humanitarian issue and we understand and accept that," he told reporters, but added: "Sgt. Jenkins is, of course, a deserter from the U.S. Army and those charges remain outstanding."

Little is known about what Jenkins' life in North Korea consisted of, or his exact motives for his 1965 defection from a unit near the Demilitarized Zone dividing the peninsula. Apparently he taught English and played an American villain in government propaganda movies. Soga, whom he met when she was a student in his English class, was 20 years his junior, when they married.

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Personally, I think it's quite a bit too late to punish him, but he did abandon this country when it needed all the soldiers it could get, so I think Jail Time, as opposed to the more customary death is appropriate, but since they probably will put him to death, I think his wife should be allowed to be there in the final moments.
September 4th, 2004  
Damien435
 
 
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September 4th, 2004  
WilsonMatthewDavid
 
Yeah, he's so old.. I think it wouldn't even be worth it..
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September 4th, 2004  
SOT_II
 

Topic: Re: That 38 Year Deserter V2.


Simple run him throught the process, see what happens, and if convicted send him to a military jail. There's nothing unique about this situation that would warrant special treatment under UCMJ.
A trial costs what a trial costs...the JAG picks up the tab and cost should not be weighed against the criminality of a trial.

If the guy was samrt he would plead out...the evidence against him seems overwhelming.
September 4th, 2004  
FlyingFrog
 
Leave him alone.

How about many German soldiers who abandoned Nazi Germany and Hitler and went to fight with allies against Nazi's? Aren't those Germans brave people or cowards?

Man you should ask this old gentelman why he abandoned USA.

Some people here say that they will do whatever the commander asks him to do? So how about if your commander ordered you to shoot down your family members or to kill the babies of the wives of the enemy soldiers? It is called war crime man.

Think about it first, before run into conclusion too fast.
September 5th, 2004  
WilsonMatthewDavid
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by FlyingFrog
Leave him alone.

How about many German soldiers who abandoned Nazi Germany and Hitler and went to fight with allies against Nazi's? Aren't those Germans brave people or cowards?

Man you should ask this old gentelman why he abandoned USA.

Some people here say that they will do whatever the commander asks him to do? So how about if your commander ordered you to shoot down your family members or to kill the babies of the wives of the enemy soldiers? It is called war crime man.

Think about it first, before run into conclusion too fast.
Good Point, if my Commanding officer ordered me to shoot my family -- I'd shoot him first.

;|
September 5th, 2004  
GuyontheRight
 
Fish, would you be upset If a PLA soldier left China it's In moment of need?
September 5th, 2004  
Redneck
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by FlyingFrog
Leave him alone.

How about many German soldiers who abandoned Nazi Germany and Hitler and went to fight with allies against Nazi's? Aren't those Germans brave people or cowards?

Man you should ask this old gentelman why he abandoned USA.

Some people here say that they will do whatever the commander asks him to do? So how about if your commander ordered you to shoot down your family members or to kill the babies of the wives of the enemy soldiers? It is called war crime man.

Think about it first, before run into conclusion too fast.

So are you trying to accuse the United States of war crimes in the Korean War?
September 5th, 2004  
Chocobo_Blitzer
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Redneck
Quote:
Originally Posted by FlyingFrog
Leave him alone.

How about many German soldiers who abandoned Nazi Germany and Hitler and went to fight with allies against Nazi's? Aren't those Germans brave people or cowards?

Man you should ask this old gentelman why he abandoned USA.

Some people here say that they will do whatever the commander asks him to do? So how about if your commander ordered you to shoot down your family members or to kill the babies of the wives of the enemy soldiers? It is called war crime man.

Think about it first, before run into conclusion too fast.

So are you trying to accuse the United States of war crimes in the Korean War?
LOL, I was going to say.........
September 5th, 2004  
Damien435
 
 
Interesting side note.

There were months of haggling over how to properly and fairly mark each side's military lines, but the main issue that prolonged the negotiations was the disposition of the many prisoners of war (POWs) on both sides. The North Koreans had maltreated many American and allied POWs, harshly depriving them and subjecting many to political thought reform that was decried as "brainwashing" in the United States. In the South's POW camps, a virtual war ensued over repatriation. About one-third of North Korean POWs and a much larger percentage of Chinese POWs did not want to return to Communist control, prompting struggles among pro-Communists and anti-Communists. Meanwhile South Korea refused to sign any armistice that would keep Korea divided, and the South's Syngman Rhee sought to hinder the talks by abruptly releasing thousands of North Korean POWs who did not want to return home. The United States decided Rhee could not be trusted and developed plans to remove him in a coup d'état. The coup was never carried out.