Worst Moment in Your Country's Millitary History - Page 6




 
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May 10th, 2005  
rkmac48
 
The Bay of Pigs was the single biggest embarassment.
May 10th, 2005  
cpl_clarke
 
 
Dieppe raid. Fire support was hopelessly inadequate, and planners had not assesed the effect of shingle on tank tracks.
May 10th, 2005  
Charge 7
 
 
Uh, the Bay of Pigs didn't involve the US military - that's why it failed. They were Cubans against Castro and they were their own unit. The CIA fostered them originally under Eisenhower and then the operation was inherited by Kennedy but at no time did the US military involve itself in the Bay of Pigs. So it wasn't a worst event in US military history.
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May 10th, 2005  
Zucchini
 
I think some US pilots flew combat missions.
May 10th, 2005  
Bory
 
 
Well it technically isn't the Australian Military, but it was the Defence Force of the time. In 1824 New South Wales' Govenor Brisbane declared Martial Law in Bathurst (Big city, in the middle of nowhere, V8's race there occasionally).
It was a war of extermination of the Wiradjuri People, the local Aboriginals. Women and childeren killed because they were black, in war started over a cultural misunderstanding.


http://www.cat.org.au/forgottenwar/bathurst2.html


http://www.nma.gov.au/schools/school...cabinet_items/

Sorry about the lack of websites, but it's a part of history Australia dosen't want to remember.

I discovered this by accident, after discovering in army records that my Great Grandfather was an Aboriginal. My family then discovered that our family was in fact of Wiradjuri decent, by tracking down birth details, Aboriginal missions and what not. Even though I look nothing like an Aboriginal, I'm desendant of the Wiradjuri People.
May 10th, 2005  
Zucchini
 
I learned all about that history when I vacationed in Australia.
May 10th, 2005  
Charge 7
 
 
Nope, the air support was what the Cubans against Castro needed and were expecting, but didn't get. There was no US military involvement in the Bay of Pigs.
May 10th, 2005  
Zucchini
 
...
In its final online release of material related to the conference, the National Security Archive has also posted audio recordings of two telephone conversations between President Kennedy and his brother, Attorney General Robert Kennedy, on March 2, 1963, in which they discuss concerns that a Senate investigating committee might reveal that the president had authorized jets from the U.S. aircraft carrier Essex to provide one hour of air cover for the brigade's B-26 bombers on the morning of April 19.* The unmarked jets failed to rendezvous with the bombers, however, because the CIA and the Pentagon were unaware of a time zone difference between Nicaragua and Cuba. Two B-26s were shot down and four Americans lost.

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The invasion was planned by the U.S. The exile army was recruited, trained, paid, and supplied by the U.S. The planes, boats, tanks and military equipment used was supplied by the U.S. The provisional government was assembled and funded by the U.S. The first on the beach were American frogmen. Four American pilots were killed in battle. Thomas “Pete” Ray, Riley Shamburger, Leo Francis Baker (who died in a gun battle after crashing) and Wade Gray. Joe Shannon, a Colonel in the Alabama Air National Guard and a surviving pilot, remembers them well, “We had lived with the Cubans for three months, and we were so close to them that their cause became our cause.”

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May 11th, 2005  
Charge 7
 
 
Those B-26s were given to the Cubans. The American pilots were CIA - not military. They may have later rejoined the military, but at the time they were not official members of the US military - as were the frogmen. I realize it's a muddy point, but it was a CIA operation and not the US military's own. I don't feel it qualifies as a US military action. If you feel differently, you're welcome to your opinion.
May 11th, 2005  
Zucchini
 
Actually I don't feel differently. All I said is that US pilots flew combat missions and they did.

The CIA, in its own little way, has taken full ownership.