Warrior vs Soldier




 
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May 27th, 2004  
Runaway
 

Topic: Warrior vs Soldier


Hi guys. I found this forum through a search. Search terms "Military" and "Forum", lol

Anyways, I am part of a discussion group, where I introduced the idea that the US Army had no room for warriors - soldiers are required to accomplish the goals of today's army.

Now, I didn't make this up. Somewhere in my training, years ago, I was introduced to the concepts of "warrior" and "soldier". Other reading and discussions have reinforced this idea.

A warrior fights for personal honor, prestige, wealth, and/or necessity. But always, the emphasis is on personal glory. Discipline is a little emphasized concept to a warrior.

A soldier, on the other hand, is nothing if not disciplined. Since this is a miitary forum, I certainly don't need to define discipline, or give examples of it here.

Anyway, I'm hoping that some members here can point me to writings, documents, or historical studies that will support my position. A warrior is detrimental to military order, and they are quickly weeded out if identified.

BTW, I would be grateful if no one points out how poorly thought out my tactics were. I introduced an idea that I am unable to back up by myself. Dumb. So, here I am asking for help from other vets

Thanks,

Runaway
May 27th, 2004  
RnderSafe
 
 
Please read the forum rules, and hop on over to the Welcoming forum and give us an intro. Thanks.

Now that that the Mod stuff is out of the way.

Quote:
A warrior fights for personal honor, prestige, wealth, and/or necessity. But always, the emphasis is on personal glory. Discipline is a little emphasized concept to a warrior.
Sorry, can't help you find any support because I find this to be completely wrong and insulting to the many men within our forces that are warriors and serve with pride, honor and selfless sacrifice. Not sure who drilled this idea into your head, but it sounds like bitter "Never gonna be" REMF teachings, to me.

I believe you may be mixing the idea of a merc and a warrior.
May 28th, 2004  
RnderSafe
 
 
http://www.tradoc.army.mil/pao/Web_s.../WarriorEthos/

I meant to add this link to my post. The Army would disagree with you as well about having no room for warriors.
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May 28th, 2004  
1217
 
Quote:
A warrior fights for personal honor, prestige, wealth, and/or necessity. But always, the emphasis is on personal glory. Discipline is a little emphasized concept to a warrior.
If you mean to say that this is your defenition of the word "warrior", then I can see your point that the persons you call "warriors" don't belong in the military.
But I don't think the definition is accurate, so if your discussion is about the meaning of the word "warrior" then I disagree.
May 28th, 2004  
Nero
 
I've heard this as well, though I'm not sure where, but when people talk about warriors, they usuall refer to the old-time kind, like knights, and Samurai and such, the warriors who fought for glory, money, and what-not. But over the years as technology has changed, warfare has changed with it, and thus, warriors have changed as well. Our soldiers today are warriors, but have different reasons for fighting, and are more organized and part of a larger force. Maybe when I wake up I'll make more sense.
May 28th, 2004  
Mark Conley
 
 
Hmmm...well this was different

a definition for warrior

\War"rior\ (?; 277), n. [OE. werreour, OF. werreour, guerreor, from guerre, werre, war. See War, and Warray.] A man engaged or experienced in war, or in the military life; a soldier; a champion

a defitniton for a soldier

\Sol"dier\, n. [OE. souldier, soudiour, souder, OF. soldier, soldoier, soldeier, sodoier, soudoier, soudier, fr. L. solidus a piece of money (hence applied to the pay of a soldier), fr. solidus solid. See Solid, and cf. Sold, n.] 1. One who is engaged in military service as an officer or a private; one who serves in an army; one of an organized body of combatants

Warrior seems to indicate one that has seen the elephant...soldier seems to mean the potential to see the elephant only.

In my opinion, experience and belonging both have reciperols in the meaning. You could be a soldier, but having not seen actual combat, so you are not a warrior. You could have seen combat and thus be a warrior, but not nessarily belong to a group to do it, as for a soldier.

As an Industrial Hygiene technican, I would have made a lousy warrior anyway. I would have been too busy asking the guy who was trying to kill me " Now, is that weapon ergonomically correct"? "Do you need the trigger adjusted to relieve the strain on your finger joint?". "Remember, breathing that rifle smoke can be harmful to your health" " And wear them earplugs to prevent the hearing loss from impact noise" maybe i could have simply bored my captors to death; do they give you a medal for that?

May 28th, 2004  
Redneck
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mark Conley
\Sol"dier\, n. [OE. souldier, soudiour, souder, OF. soldier, soldoier, soldeier, sodoier, soudoier, soudier, fr. L. solidus a piece of money (hence applied to the pay of a soldier), fr. solidus solid. See Solid, and cf. Sold, n.] 1. One who is engaged in military service as an officer or a private; one who serves in an army; one of an organized body of combatants
So what are you from E-3 to E-9?
May 28th, 2004  
RnderSafe
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mark Conley
As an Industrial Hygiene technican, I would have made a lousy warrior anyway. I would have been too busy asking the guy who was trying to kill me " Now, is that weapon ergonomically correct"? "Do you need the trigger adjusted to relieve the strain on your finger joint?". "Remember, breathing that rifle smoke can be harmful to your health" " And wear them earplugs to prevent the hearing loss from impact noise" maybe i could have simply bored my captors to death; do they give you a medal for that?
*wiping tears*

Quote:
Originally Posted by Redneck
So what are you from E-3 to E-9?
Well, in the Army you're still a Pvt at E-3. After that, you're a mean SOB ready and willing to chew up and eat any young Pvt that comes your way. That's in the Army, anyway. Oh, and the Marine Corps eat their young as well, but only up to E-2. [/quote]
May 28th, 2004  
Redneck
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by RnderSafe
Quote:
Originally Posted by Redneck
So what are you from E-3 to E-9?
Well, in the Army you're still a Pvt at E-3.
Daggone it, I hate losing cool points.


I don't know, Mark, I think you'd fare pretty well as a prisoner, they'd be some pretty interesting interrogations.
"Tell us what you do in the Satan military!"
"Did I tell you about the time an owl took over the control tower at Tinker AFB and made a C-130 land at Wal-Mart and I got sent out to do a chemical analysis on the cheese poofs?"
May 28th, 2004  
Mark Conley
 
 
redneck: I Absolutley Love That!


im rolling on the floor laughing so hard that the other workers were looking at me funny....