Should the US ban the use of land mines




View Poll Results :Should the US ban the use of land mines
yes 11 37.93%
no 18 62.07%
not sure 0 0%
Voters: 29. You may not vote on this poll

 
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November 28th, 2004  
Duty Honor Country
 
 

Topic: Should the US ban the use of land mines


Once again the US refuses to ban the use of landmines

US urges ban on antitank mines, but will shun Nairobi talks

WASHINGTON (AFP) - The United States, stung by insurgent attacks in Iraq, has urged the international community to consider banning all sales of antitank and other heavy landmines, but ruled out its participation in an international conference on mines designed to hurt primarily people.

Members of the so-called Ottawa Convention will gather in Nairobi, Kenya, Sunday to review implementation of the 1997 accord that bans use, development, production, stockpiling and transfer of antipersonnel landmines.

As many as 143 nations have signed up to the accord, which took effect in March 1999.

But a group of 42 countries, led by the United States, Russia and China, have refused, citing the need to protect their troops in various theaters of deployment...
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Should the US ban landmines?
November 28th, 2004  
Darcia
 
The USA has many ways of removing Landmines afterwards if they want too, However they are right in the fact they may need to use them in defense of thier own troops. I would say it depends on where they use them also, they shouldn't use them in city areas
November 28th, 2004  
Lupos
 
 
Can't say I agree, I think that land mines should go the way of the trebuchet (I think it's spelled like that) and just stop being produced.
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November 28th, 2004  
Darcia
 
Even if they are stopped in production thier are still Millions of them that can be used.
November 28th, 2004  
A Can of Man
 
 
I'd say don't ban it. Just stop using it. Last thing you want is yet another rule to hold you back and it may become a problem with some future weapons if indeed they are classified as "mines."
November 28th, 2004  
Shadowalker
 
 
Are the mines left in places like cambodia mainly anti-tank or -personel mines? Which ones are most responsible for maiming the people living there now?
November 28th, 2004  
EuroSpike
 

Topic: Re: Should the US ban the use of land mines


"US urges ban on antitank mines, but will shun Nairobi talks"

Antitank mine ban would be a superior stupidness.

Why to ban landmines? It is only a defence weapon and threatens only possible invader. Do storaged landmines form a real danger?

Just change the names on mine boxes in storage and all MINES just disappear. 8)
November 28th, 2004  
Doc.S
 
I dont think anyone else will take them away and one more thing - Sweden that has this stupid -anti-landmine- thing are/have constructing some of this worlds best landmine clear up machinery that exsist today. 8) However that wont help this army that soon will be on a art museum too if this country stick to the partys ruling this place.


LINK:

http://www.swedec.mil.se/photo.php?id=82984&nid=24289


http://www.swedec.mil.se/photo.php?id=43855&nid=13907


Cheers:
Doc.S
November 28th, 2004  
beardo
 
a quote that seems appropriate to this discussion

''a Landmine stays on duty long after the soldier does''

meaning that once the war is over what happens? does the army that buried them go and dig every single one of them up? or do they leave them to blow up children years yater?
November 28th, 2004  
EuroSpike
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by beardo
a quote that seems appropriate to this discussion

''a Landmine stays on duty long after the soldier does''

meaning that once the war is over what happens? does the army that buried them go and dig every single one of them up? or do they leave them to blow up children years yater?
Primary goal is to defend against invader and after-war mineproblems are the smallest thing to be concerned about.

Minefields are marked on maps to informate their position to own troops and that way to prevent own troops to walk into minefields. Maps are also useful when seeking and disarming deployed minefields after war.