Operation Phantom Fury, The Attack on Fallujah - Page 4




 
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November 11th, 2004  
DTop
 
 
Here's the latest info -

Quote:
(AP) - The top U.S. commander in Iraq, Gen. George Casey, told President Bush on Wednesday that his troops are "making very good progress" securing Iraq, as U.S. forces and their Iraqi allies essentially paralyzed insurgent forces in Fallujah and cut off their escape routes from the city. "He said that things are going well in Fallujah," Bush said on a day when U.S. forces cornered insurgents after a swift advance that seized control of 70 percent of the militant stronghold.
http://story.news.yahoo.com/fc?cid=3...World&cat=Iraq
November 11th, 2004  
Kane
 
Coast is somewhat clear in Fallujah for now. Now lets hope the situation gets under control at other places.
November 11th, 2004  
Missileer
 
 

Topic: Re: Insurgents cannot withstand frontal attacks by U.S. Mili


Quote:
Originally Posted by DTop
Quote:
Originally Posted by Secrecy
Quick victory is common in this type of war, but it will be short lived. Once Fallujah is secure, the insurgent fighters will once again start destabilizing the region. This is Guerilla warfare guys, the insurgents don't have the will nor resources to hold the line. Once the entire city is swept across and blocked, further violence will follow...and I can assure you that will happen again.
I beg to differ. quick victory is not very common in a guerilla war. It wasn't quick when I was in Vietnam. Each conflict is unique. I'm sure the terrorists want to regroup and destabilize the whole area but we're there to prevent that. Each victory will make life more difficult for the bad guys. I still maintain that our forces are doing a great job in Fallujah during this operation.
I agree wholeheartedly Top. I have read that there are 600 bodies in Fallujah all of which belong to the fighters who were dumb enough to stay. There are others on the run but we're on their collective butts. It's pretty hard to regroup when several hundred Marine snipers are just waiting for you to slow down. These guys are not able to reform into effective fighting units and have almost no communication which is crucial. I read where Mosques are no longer being protected. If fire is traced to one, the bombers are called in. Our Commanders are moving at a pace designed to maximize casualties on our their side and protect our guys.
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November 11th, 2004  
egoz
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hegario
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/middle_east/3997461.stm
I can't see Ramadi being an issue at the moment, if anything, it's a diversion. I don't know if we're lacking troops in the area, but we seem to be doing fine everywhere else. If we need more troops I'm sure the commanders will get them with or without a consensus.
November 11th, 2004  
LIPS
 
 
I concur
November 12th, 2004  
Kane
 
So in other words, the U.S. is experimenting on new tactics to see whether it works or not.

Once the siege is over, what lays ahead? Time will tell ladies and gentlemen.
November 12th, 2004  
Missileer
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Secrecy
So in other words, the U.S. is experimenting on new tactics to see whether it works or not.

Once the siege is over, what lays ahead? Time will tell ladies and gentlemen.
Please, don't even attempt to understand tactics used by the finest Military minds on the Earth, you will only become more exasperated than before.
November 12th, 2004  
Kane
 
Speaking from experience?
November 12th, 2004  
Missileer
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Secrecy
Speaking from experience?
From pride, from the top down to the foxhole. Something you could use a little more of. I put my three years in, how about you?
November 12th, 2004  
Redleg
 
 
Please stay on topic, and continue that conversation on PMs.

Thanks