Hunters and the Army - Page 3




 
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November 2nd, 2004  
03USMC
 
 
I grew up hunting in scrub desert in Southwest Texas. Yeah I know our deer were about the size of large dogs. The most important thing that I feel hunting gives you is field craft and stalking skills. Most of the really good scouts are country boys acustomed to moving in diverse terrian. However I know of more the a couple of Snipers who came from urban and suburan back grounds.
November 2nd, 2004  
larsrq
 
There must be someone that say against you guys Otherwise there is no discussion.

I have some experience when dealing with soldiers that have civilian experience in specific areas, such as hunting, diving etc. I ahve to say that it sometimes can create a problem especially if they are very experienced. You know there is a civilian way and a military way to do things and sometimes they are not compatible. It can be hard to teach them the "correct" way to do things.

Thats my experience...
November 2nd, 2004  
03USMC
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by larsrq
There must be someone that say against you guys Otherwise there is no discussion.

I have some experience when dealing with soldiers that have civilian experience in specific areas, such as hunting, diving etc. I ahve to say that it sometimes can create a problem especially if they are very experienced. You know there is a civilian way and a military way to do things and sometimes they are not compatible. It can be hard to teach them the "correct" way to do things.

Thats my experience...
I agree to a point. You can train people to do most anything. However if a person has an ability it may also be polished and refined on with military training.
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November 2nd, 2004  
larsrq
 
If their minds are just opened enough it works but if they are to set on the way they usually do things it can be hard.

But I do agree that hunters can be good for snipers.

The problem I've seen most is amature divers that think they know everything when they start Navy diving school and that doesn't work at all.
November 2nd, 2004  
03USMC
 
 
I don't believe just being a hunter makes you any more qualified to be a sniper or designated marksman than say a kid from the Bronx who was taught to shoot by a PMI in boot camp. Sniper is a learned craft and one with a desire to master it will, regardless of back ground.
It just seems that hunters and country boys tend to gravitate towards it more.
November 2nd, 2004  
ravensword227
 
Some of the best ball turret gunners in WW2 and door gunners in Vietnam were hunters. They understood how to add lead to hit their targets. The military does their best to teach this principle, and the hunter just has the advantage because of experience.

Quote:
Originally Posted by larsrq
You know there is a civilian way and a military way to do things and sometimes they are not compatible. It can be hard to teach them the "correct" way to do things.
I see where you are coming from. Shooting and hunting experience helps and it is all relative, but all the soldiers had better keep an open mind when going through training. For instance, engaging enemy aircraft with small arms is not quite the same as shooting duck.

For an example of how to do it "by the book":

REMOVED


Mod edit: No.
November 2nd, 2004  
RnderSafe
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ravensword227
Quote:
Originally Posted by RnderSafe
Many skills learned from hunting can be beneficial, while many, like shooting for instance, can often times hurt - especially when it comes to long range target interdiction. Bad habits die hard.
Hunters make better snipers or squad designated marksmen than regular riflemen. Trying to tell a hunter to use suppression fire will definitely not sit well with him. “Spray and Pray” is just stupid to him to understand.

Invariably, hunters make the best snipers not only because of their marksmanship but because of their ability to be cohesive to their environment, the woodlands. Some people may concede that a hunter has the potential to be a good soldier, but that doesn’t necessarily mean he will. Those people say that hunting and killing deer, for example, is much easier than killing a human because deer do not shoot back. I disagree; if the soldier(s) cannot spot you they cannot kill you - unless they are indiscriminately using artillery. <snip>
I went ahead and cut this short. All I can really say is -- Wrong. Perhaps you should get some actual experience before you attempt to play "know it all" in an area you clearly have little idea about.

Love,
An old hunter, S/S, S/S instructor.
November 2nd, 2004  
03USMC
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by RnderSafe
Quote:
Originally Posted by ravensword227
Quote:
Originally Posted by RnderSafe
Many skills learned from hunting can be beneficial, while many, like shooting for instance, can often times hurt - especially when it comes to long range target interdiction. Bad habits die hard.
Hunters make better snipers or squad designated marksmen than regular riflemen. Trying to tell a hunter to use suppression fire will definitely not sit well with him. “Spray and Pray” is just stupid to him to understand.

Invariably, hunters make the best snipers not only because of their marksmanship but because of their ability to be cohesive to their environment, the woodlands. Some people may concede that a hunter has the potential to be a good soldier, but that doesn’t necessarily mean he will. Those people say that hunting and killing deer, for example, is much easier than killing a human because deer do not shoot back. I disagree; if the soldier(s) cannot spot you they cannot kill you - unless they are indiscriminately using artillery. <snip>
I went ahead and cut this short. All I can really say is -- Wrong. Perhaps you should get some actual experience before you attempt to play "know it all" in an area you clearly have little idea about.

Love,
An old hunter, S/S, S/S instructor.

Thank you Sir! You said what I was dying to say. But much more tactfully than I could muster.
November 2nd, 2004  
ravensword227
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by RnderSafe
I went ahead and cut this short. All I can really say is -- Wrong. Perhaps you should get some actual experience before you attempt to play "know it all" in an area you clearly have little idea about.

Love,
An old hunter, S/S, S/S instructor.
Perhaps you should not pretend to know my experience? Yeah, ok I will stop being so wrong... I gotta go work up a load for my .357 so I will see you around.
November 2nd, 2004  
Redneck
 
 
ravensword227, adjust your attitude immediately. You are wrong and arguing about it will not change anything. Do not make another off-topic post in this thread.