Dealing With PTSD




 
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July 10th, 2011  
lvcabbie
 
 

Topic: Dealing With PTSD


I found the following to share:

The Demons of War are Persistent
A post on CJ's blog, A Soldier's Perspective, about beating PTSD. Read it at -

http://militarygear.com/asp/2011/07/...#comment-97991

July 10th, 2011  
KJ
 
 
As per everything on this touchy subject the defeats and wins over PTSD is subjective and based on personal experience.

My reply here is not ment to cast doubt in any way shape or form over this veterans story, but it is HIS story.
Not the story of everyone suffering from PTSD on a daily basis, suffering from PTSD on rare occasions or even never suffering from PTSD but remembering their time in the mix with a divided sence of melancholy and pride.

When BA 01 "The lucky batt" returned from their opening rotation in Bosnia where they during most of their rotation got to experience the horrors of war without the balancing reaction of being able to take the fight to the enemy due to ROE,s the medics and crisis teams stood redy with sticks.
Using their saliva to count stresslevels experienced.

Sure they HAD these teams at their disposal, the real question should in my mind be: "Where they of any use?"
Now I wasnīt on BA01, nor can I imagine the terror of experiancing a war with my hands litterally and effectively tied behind my back.
(You guys in the Stan today thinking it obscenly difficult to get CAS or ARTY support, think again.
The general secretary of the UN security council doesnīt personally have to approve your CAS..)

My cousin where on that mission, and after I had done my first couple of rotations we talked about this in lenght. ONCE.
He remembered his time in that shithole vividly, all the good, all the bad.
He still today think what he did had honor, although done right they could have saved ALOT more people.

HIS case today would probably be classified as some sort of mild PTSD.
He classifies it as bad memories and bad dreams.
Then he remembers all the good they did, all the comradeships created and the satisfaction of doing something he BELIEVED in to the core of his being.
In HIS case what has helped him is the reunions with his former comrades in arms.
Why? Because they are the ONLY ones who experienced that particular war the same way he did.
They couldnīt step on grass for a couple of years either.
They dropped into fightingpositions at sharp noices and wouldnīt sit with their backs towards strangers..

The doctors with their swabs and theories didnīt understand.

That is why I THINK that it is crucial to let soldiers that really suffers from these deceses stand square infront of their comrades and tell their story.
In MY mind that is the only way to get to the core of the problem with most of these cases.
Stand eye to eye with someone who LIVED it the same way you did and talk about it.
If you got the guts to talk to shrinks and medics about your experiences talking to a fellow vet from the same campaign would be a breeze.

One of the biggest problems right now is that you have fobbits claiming PTSD soaking up resources that should be used on people that really needs them.

I rarely speak about these things infront of civilians for the same reason.
They can never know or understand.
But anyone who has ever been in the mix for real will, agree or not they understand.

My 2 cents worth on the subject.
The only ones I will share on the open board anyways.

KJ sends...
July 10th, 2011  
rattler
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by KJ
The doctors with their swabs and theories didnīt understand.
They probably do, but they dont want to let you know (my very own theory).

Quote:
Originally Posted by KJ
That is why I THINK that it is crucial to let soldiers that really suffer from these deseases stand square in front of their comrades and tell their story.
In MY mind that is the only way to get to the core of the problem with most of these cases.
Stand eye to eye with someone who LIVED it the same way you did and talk about it.
If you got the guts to talk to shrinks and medics about your experiences talking to a fellow vet from the same campaign would be a breeze.
I think youre right here: A bit like AA, just understanding and listening to others that deal with the same stuff can give you orientation and direction (though rarely cure you (?) ).

Quote:
Originally Posted by KJ
One of the biggest problems right now is that you have fobbits claiming PTSD soaking up resources that should be used on people that really needs them.
As cruel as it may sound, but the numbers speak *for* them, the overall economic damage is way lower from PTSD suffering vets than e.g. from the one of people that develop lung cancer. And, as today "The Market" rules undemocratically (nobody elected him after all), thats where any government will direct its attention to, vets problems dont make up for deficits.

Quote:
Originally Posted by KJ
I rarely speak about these things infront of civilians for the same reason. They can never know or understand.
I have come to know a lot of civilians that suffer from the same, though sometimes for other reasons or in other contextes, but basically the same illnes (acccidents, diseases, medics, doctors, NGO workers, photo journos etc.). What I find is that they need way longer to realize where their suddenly appearing symptoms come from as the civilian doctors are not trained to look and understand those connections that sometimes reach years back. Initial mistreatment hence is not uncommon, and it is more present than in the mil world.

Anyway, all people suffering or trying to deal with PTSS deserve at leat the same understanding/support that an alcoholic gets, and this is not often the case: I know of people in struggles with VA for years, and with their disease progressing.

FWIW,

Rattler
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July 11th, 2011  
LeEnfield
 
 
There is no easy explanation of PTSD, and each person has to face his demons. One chap I knew who was at Arnhem went down with it some 60 years after after the battle while he was being interviewed for a local paper, and signed him self into an institution to get help but he never settled back into normal life. The 60 years he spent prior to all this he had no problems whats so ever, so you never know if this thing is going to rear it head and bite you.
 


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