WWII Quiz - Page 169




 
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January 27th, 2009  
Mayser
 
 
your answer would be correct, the turn is urs tiger!
January 27th, 2009  
MontyB
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mayser
your answer would be correct, the turn is urs tiger!
Ok well here goes...

HMNZS Moa and Kiwi were involved in an incident in January 1943 name the other vessel involved and the outcome.

January 27th, 2009  
perseus
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by MontyB
Ok well here goes...

HMNZS Moa and Kiwi were involved in an incident in January 1943 name the other vessel involved and the outcome.

The Kiki rammed and wrecked The Japanese submarine I-1
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January 27th, 2009  
MontyB
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by perseus
The Kiki rammed and wrecked The Japanese submarine I-1
I will give you half of it, they did ram (although in New Zealand records it was the HMNZS Moa that is credited with the actual ramming) and destroy the I-1, but what was the outcome or significance of the action?
January 27th, 2009  
perseus
 
 
Quote:
although in New Zealand records it was the HMNZS Moa that is credited with the actual ramming
Interesting, because most sources suggest it was the Kiwi, you would think they would have got that bit right. This is a fuller account

On the night of 29 January 1943 the Japanese submarine I-1 was under the command of Lieutenant Commander Eiichi Sakamoto off the Kamimbo Bay area (near Tambea or Cape Esperance), west of Honiara, when it was detected by the New Zealand corvettes HMNZS Kiwi and HMNZS Moa...... As the New Zealanders approached, the phosphorescent outline of the submarine could be clearly seen so the Kiwi dropped six depth-charges. Shortly after, it dropped another six and the submarine was forced to the surface with its electric motors apparently disabled. Switching on its diesels, the I-1 made a run for it and a surface battle ensured, with all three vessels exchanging gunfire. During the short battle, the submarine altered course to starboard just before the Kiwi rammed it on the port side abaft of the conning tower. Numerous hits were landed at this time. The Kiwi again rammed the submarine and an officer, probably the Japanese Captain, was seen to be hit by machine-gun fire. A third ramming damaged both vessels and the Moa took up the chase, following the submarine while continually firing its gun. More than two hours after the first attack, the I-1 hit a reef that was to become its final resting place. The next morning revealed the I-1 projecting about 40 to 50 feet out of the water at an angle of 45 degrees

http://www.michaelmcfadyenscuba.info...hp?page_id=383
January 27th, 2009  
MontyB
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by perseus
Interesting, because most sources suggest it was the Kiwi, you would think they would have got that bit right. This is a fuller account

On the night of 29 January 1943 the Japanese submarine I-1 was under the command of Lieutenant Commander Eiichi Sakamoto off the Kamimbo Bay area (near Tambea or Cape Esperance), west of Honiara, when it was detected by the New Zealand corvettes HMNZS Kiwi and HMNZS Moa...... As the New Zealanders approached, the phosphorescent outline of the submarine could be clearly seen so the Kiwi dropped six depth-charges. Shortly after, it dropped another six and the submarine was forced to the surface with its electric motors apparently disabled. Switching on its diesels, the I-1 made a run for it and a surface battle ensured, with all three vessels exchanging gunfire. During the short battle, the submarine altered course to starboard just before the Kiwi rammed it on the port side abaft of the conning tower. Numerous hits were landed at this time. The Kiwi again rammed the submarine and an officer, probably the Japanese Captain, was seen to be hit by machine-gun fire. A third ramming damaged both vessels and the Moa took up the chase, following the submarine while continually firing its gun. More than two hours after the first attack, the I-1 hit a reef that was to become its final resting place. The next morning revealed the I-1 projecting about 40 to 50 feet out of the water at an angle of 45 degrees

http://www.michaelmcfadyenscuba.info...hp?page_id=383

Yep it is an odd one but you have missed the important thing that resulted from this event.
There is something else that happened after the submarine came to rest on the reef.
January 28th, 2009  
Mayser
 
 
Critical codes remained on board and the Japanese command tried unsuccessfully to destroy the boat with air and submarine attacks. The US Navy salvaged 200,000 pages of intelligence: code books, charts, manuals, and the ship's log.
January 28th, 2009  
MontyB
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mayser
Critical codes remained on board and the Japanese command tried unsuccessfully to destroy the boat with air and submarine attacks. The US Navy salvaged 200,000 pages of intelligence: code books, charts, manuals, and the ship's log.
Indeed that is what I was looking for, it is believed that this information lead to the deciphering of Admiral Yamamoto's flight plans and subsequent death in April 1943.

Anyway over to who ever wants the next question.
January 28th, 2009  
Mayser
 
 
woot woot! ok heres the question...

On what island in the Central Pacific did US Marines make an heroic stand in December 1941?
January 28th, 2009  
tomtom22
 
 
Wake Island