WWII, dividing families?




 
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January 22nd, 2005  
Damien435
 
 

Topic: WWII, dividing families?


One of my friends who joined the Army with me has the last name of Eichmann, I know all the jews of this forum and many gentiles alike are guessing who I am going to mention next, that is right, my friend's uncle was Adolf Eichmann, one of the more infamous Jew killers (pardon the term) and one of the higher ups on Israel's list of ex-Nazi's. So what is the point of this post? Simple, WWII, like the American Civil War involved the division of families, brothers fighting brothers, quite literally in this case. My friends family is quite large, by the 1930's most of his family had emmigrated to America, but a small handful, most notably Adolf Eichmann, stayed behind in Germany. While some people will be quite upset about this, let this be known, one of my friend's family members fought for the Nazi's, Adolf, 14 of his family members fought on the side of America in various branches of the military, logistical support and combat positions alike. I guess my point to this post is that all wars split up family members, whether it be a tribal war in Africa or World War II, families will always be split, remember this, but do not allow this to tear your families apart, should, god forbid, this ever happen to you.
January 22nd, 2005  
A Can of Man
 
 
World War II split Korean families apart and that's still a big issue today.
January 22nd, 2005  
Doppleganger
 
 
Firstly that's one hell of a notorious person to have as an uncle! Secondly, collective guilt does not work and I don't think anyone would honestly tar your friend with the same brush just because he is related to one of the most infamous Nazis of all time.

War can and does split families, with the Korean situation being the most obvious example still left. In Germany too families were split up after the end of WW2, not just in Germany proper but in former German provinces like East Prussia which is now part of Poland.
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