Whats the most decisive naval battle or incident in history? - Page 3




 
--
 
June 24th, 2004  
Young Winston
 
 
I reckon the battle of Midway. The Japanese were at their peak and the Americans were really under the pump. A great triumph by the Yanks which turned the Pacific War dramatically in the Allies favour.
June 24th, 2004  
Big_Z
 
 
I agree with johnmckeogh. The battle of midway was a huge success for America as well as Wake island <-[not really a success but still]. It gave America the confidence of a superpower.
August 27th, 2004  
Bellerophon
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Damien435
I still don't know why the French had a large, heavy Iron chain tying their ships together at Trafalgar, can anyone explain to me why they did that? All it really did was allow the English to our maneuver them and use it to bog down the French Fleet. And when you think about it, that was the only battle Napoleon lost before he invaded Russia, but it was the most important one, it made the Continential system impossible to enforce.

Hello Damien,actually you've got the wrong battle...you're thinking of the battle of the Nile(aboukir)at Trafalgar the French and Spanish fleets formed a long battle line under sail...Nelson(outnumbered by 9 ships) broke the line in two places...by doing so the front of the Franco/Spanish line had to tack back(this took over 2 hours)the remaining French and Spanish ships were annihilated...basically Nelson defeated his enemy without firing a shot..pure genius



http://www.voodoo.cz/victory/trafalgar.html

http://www.nelsonsnavy.co.uk/broadside1.html
--
August 27th, 2004  
David Hurlbert
 
I too would say the Battle of Midway. This battle actually delivered a blow to the most powerful Navy in the world the Japanese - and a blow from which they would never fully recover.
August 27th, 2004  
godofthunder9010
 
 
I'd have to say Trafalgar. That defeat kept opposition to Napoleon alive. But "never firing a shot" is also wrong. A basic understanding of naval tactics of the time is essential to understanding Trafalgar. Crossing the T is the desired result to win in 1 to 1 ship combat. More on this later.
August 28th, 2004  
Bellerophon
 
Hey thunder
I just meant that Nelson broke the line without firing a shot,and in so doing won the battle.
He Basically took out 1/3 of the Franco/Spanish line without firing a shot.
August 28th, 2004  
godofthunder9010
 
 
Right, well you statement was sorta open to interpretation. He did a brilliant maneuver and crossed the T on the French/Spanish ships by running at them full speed. See, here's where I wish I could draw a picture cuz its hard to explain in words. Brilliant move though!
September 10th, 2004  
Rufus Excalibur
 
Trafalgar, Jutland, Midway, all insignificant in comparison to Taranto. One could class this as a naval air strike, but as obsolete Fairy Swordfish with one torpedo each destroyed the Italian Capital ships and ended Mussolini's dream of control of the Med, a Jap military attache was watching from a hill overlooking the port. He reported what he had seen back to Tokyo, then Pearl Harbour and the fate of the Battleship was sealed. Naval warfare would never be the same again.
September 10th, 2004  
gladius
 
That last post was good one, I kind of agree with it.

The Battle of the Atlantic, I have to say is a significant one also.

It refined the concept of submarine/anti-submarine warfare includng the use of sonar.

I mean we couldn't have had liberated Europe from Hitler if we hadn't won that one.
September 10th, 2004  
godofthunder9010
 
 
Quite true that the Battle of the Atlantic was extremely important. Of course, it ultimately constitutes hundreds of smaller battles throughout the Atlantic Ocean, and spanning a 6 year period, all being grouped under a single name. The Battle of the Atlantic kinda cheats the rules of what a "battle" is.