Torture resistance training.




 
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October 5th, 2011  
eTe
 
 

Topic: Torture resistance training.


I have been thinking about this a lot lately.
I can imagine this sort of thing could be the toughest you go through, and I know it happens because even as a civvie, I don't see the military with rose tinted glasses.
This got a write up in the paper a while ago I think. Standard response, people were horrified. But I imagine anyone should be able to understand how important it maybe be.
My question is, have you ever undergone this sort of thing? Ever looked into it a bit? Know of any of the techniques they use in there?

One thing I read is that it does increase your limit when placed in those circumstances.
October 5th, 2011  
42RM
 
Survival, Evasion, Resistance & Extraction (SERE) training is tough but is also a necessary part of my training.

I donīt think we should go into the details of the training itself. The less a potential enemy knows about my training the better for my survival.
October 5th, 2011  
Spartan613
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by eTe
I have been thinking about this a lot lately.
I can imagine this sort of thing could be the toughest you go through, and I know it happens because even as a civvie, I don't see the military with rose tinted glasses.
This got a write up in the paper a while ago I think. Standard response, people were horrified. But I imagine anyone should be able to understand how important it maybe be.
My question is, have you ever undergone this sort of thing? Ever looked into it a bit? Know of any of the techniques they use in there?

One thing I read is that it does increase your limit when placed in those circumstances.
Due to modern touchy-feely policies, CAC (conduct after capture) training isn't as tough as it used to be. But even in the old days, it was more about psychology than physical "torture" (and torture has been found to be an inefficient method of gaining the info you want).

You can undergo "hostage survival" training in Australia as a civilian (if you have the cash). There are plenty of providers these day, of varying quality, who deliver this training.
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October 5th, 2011  
42RM
 
Torture does work. If it were useless, then it wouldn't be used anymore. However, it does work, especially on people not prepared for it. The problem is in the reliability rate of the information extracted.
October 5th, 2011  
senojekips
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by 42RM
If it were useless, then it wouldn't be used anymore.
I was once told, "Christ,.. given a little time and the right tools you can make a cat sing Happy Birthday, but that in no way implies that the cat actually means it." or words to that effect.
October 5th, 2011  
42RM
 
The information provided through interrogation or torture, is never allowed to stand alone. It is only one source. All information will be verified.

In every kind of interrogation control questions is part of it. It's not just about getting people to confess to anything. Itīs also about verification of the information you already have.
October 5th, 2011  
eTe
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by 42RM
Torture does work. If it were useless, then it wouldn't be used anymore. However, it does work, especially on people not prepared for it. The problem is in the reliability rate of the information extracted.
True.
People will say anything, regardless of the amount of truth contained in those words to get pain to stop. Or so I've heard, obviously.

I didn't expect to learn much, information on this training is very difficult to find.
Thankyou for your response though.
October 6th, 2011  
Spartan613
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by 42RM
Torture does work. If it were useless, then it wouldn't be used anymore. However, it does work, especially on people not prepared for it. The problem is in the reliability rate of the information extracted.
Which means it doesn't work.

Unreliable information is useless. People will say whatever you want them to under torture.

More sophisticated methods glean more actionable intelligence.
October 6th, 2011  
Spartan613
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by eTe
True.
People will say anything, regardless of the amount of truth contained in those words to get pain to stop. Or so I've heard, obviously.

I didn't expect to learn much, information on this training is very difficult to find.
Thankyou for your response though.
If you're serious, get in touch with my mates here.

http://greenlanyardsolutions.com.au/

They're world class.
October 6th, 2011  
42RM
 
Itīs not the purpose of this type of interrogation.
There are many extreme methods of interrogation that are still, sadly, in use today, particularly in military environments. A dilemma of extreme interrogation is that whilst they may produce information, the truth of these may be a different matter. When subjects reach satisficing, they will say or do anything to reduce their discomfort. Professional interrogators knows that! And unreliable information may be verified as credible at a later date.



Extreme Interrogation.

Threats vary on a long sliding scale from minor to extreme. You can threaten to tell other people or you can put a gun in a person's mouth and threaten to pull the trigger. At the extreme, the goal is to create terror and belief that pain or something highly undesirable is about to happen. Threats may be of physical pain, harm to significant others or action that the subject desperately seeks not to happen. Blackmail works in this way, where the threat of exposure of secrets can lead people into desperate action. Threats work on fear and anticipated pain, where the thought and expectation of discomfort leads the person to imagine and virtually feel the pain, physical or emotional, that would be experienced. Threats may be unspoken, for example where the interrogator plays with a weapon or where instruments of torture are visible. If the individual is immune to threats, then people they hold dear may be threatened, such as friends. The problem with threats is that if the subject calls your bluff and you do not carry out the threat, then your credibility as an interrogator is lost.

The application of pain is a basic technique of extreme interrogation, whether through creating general discomfort, physical beating or using instruments of torture. Whilst many people will do anything to escape pain, extreme cases such as SF/SOF is trained to withstand high levels of pain. It also has surprised many interrogators how people with high ideals will go through terrible pain rather than give in.

Interrogators can also use disorientation methods to disorient their subjects, including:

Language that causes confusion.
Rapid barrages of questions.
Use of hypnosis and hypnotic language.
Time distortion, such as through changing meal times, turning lights on and off at different times.
Use of narcotics.

The basic principle of disorientation is to reduce the person's sense of judgment and their ability to make rational decisions. When asked questions, they may thus give answers that they would not give if they were able to think rationally before responding.

Depriving people of basic needs can lead both to disorientation, causing poor judgment as above, or desperation that leads to provision of information in order get that which is needed.
Deprivation can include:

Food and drink: Extreme hunger or thirst can persuade.
Sleep: Lack of sleep disorientates.
Company: Solitary confinement leads to craving attention (especially for some).
Sensation: Sensory deprivation disorientates.
Access: To information or significant others.

Debilitation is the systematic weakening of the person. Physically this may be through means such as corporal punishment, pain and deprivation. Psychological weakening may take place through humiliation and other actions, such as making them stand naked, forced religious sacrilege, triggering of phobias and mock executions.

Torture has many faces -and they work.
 


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