Roman Army : What Made this Army Great. - Page 3




View Poll Results :Romans: Great or Not Great?
Tony the Tiger Great! 22 78.57%
Well, Sort of Great! 4 14.29%
Ive Seen Better Soldiers in my Toy Box! 2 7.14%
Well Better than Nothing 0 0%
Voters: 28. You may not vote on this poll

 
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August 7th, 2004  
Endiminion
 
 
All of what that has been said about the romans is true, there has been a very important part skipped. Roman ingenuity. This is important because the romans more specifically took current technology and either integrated it or improved it. We can see this when we look at when rome was first forming. They looked upon their neighboring greeks to learn from them, as well as many other cultures.

The romans knew that greeks were a very intelligent people, so they captured them and made alot of them tutors for their children.
They also copied basic chain mail armor designs at first from the celtic tribes.
A very important weapon for the roman cohorts was the Gladius, which was originally a spanish design, which was occupied by the visigoths I believe. This was a great weapon because a well disciplined cohort would use this weapon only for stabbing.
The romans also knew not to use the gladius as a cavalry weapon because it was too short. so they adopted the gaulic spatha.
August 7th, 2004  
godofthunder9010
 
 
The Roman army's tactics, weapons and overall discipline were just amazing. Just as the Greek empire before them, they so completely outclassed all opposition that its almost scary. They also were their own engineering core, that is to say, they Roman soldiers built all the stuff that we still sit in awe of. The roads, the aqueducts, etc, etc.

Rome is completely unsurpassed in human history for what they did with the technologies they had.
August 7th, 2004  
MosquitoMan
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by xopxe1
P.S> my most liked piece of equipmwent of the roman legioner is the spear ( or was it javelin?!) after throwing them the enemy lines had to continue fighting mostly without shields
That would be the phalanx, but spear or javelin is close enough.

Romans had awesome tactics, awesome training, and awesome leadership (well, most of the time). Their turtle formations were perfect for protecting them from arrows and spears. They were also one of the first armies to form ranks, where the older soldiers would be farther back, and the newer soldiers would be more towards the front.
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August 13th, 2004  
godofthunder9010
 
 
I was under the impression that Phalanx was a military formation developed by the Greeks and perfected by the Macedonians. Is there a weapon by that name as well? Anyways, I thought he was talking about a Pilum.
August 15th, 2004  
Gunner13
 
 
godofthunder9010: No, you're correct when you say the Phalanx was a battle formation and not a weapon (not before the late 20th Century anyway!). As I mentioned in a previous posting:

The Pilum came in a couple of flavors, but it was primarily a throwing weapon - a javelin. The Roman Army did make use of thrusting spears, the Hasta, on more than one occasion, but those were different than the Pilum.
October 12th, 2007  
Josh678
 
 
Id say they were great for their Legions and for throwing the pilla which either killed the enemy or made him ditch his shield.Also because they always fought a war all out and were persistent in getting what they wanted.
October 16th, 2007  
Del Boy
 
They were battle-hardened veterans who hardly ever went home, I have read. And they were absolutely relentless. For insurrection against the occupation of Rome they would crucify men along the roadside from town to town.

And having destroyed Jerusalem for rebellion against Rome at the last quarter of AD1, they performed holocaust on the Jews without mercy, and cleared the land completely.

THEN - over a few hundred years, they kept returning at intervals and repeating the medicine - another holocaust each time - just to make sure it stayed fixed. Making your way back to start again did not work.

Worse than the Sopranos!
January 5th, 2008  
Cdt Matteo
 
 
Orginized, great formations/drill, superb equipment, merciless (not so great but made them all the better), great training, and the use of inducted barbarian soldiers on the front lines. All of this put together equals a very effective army.
January 16th, 2008  
Del Boy
 
Agreed. Battle, travel hardened professional soldiers. I suppose that the pre -WW11 armies of the British Empire were somewhat like that. Professional, experienced, highly trained and unemotional.

There is an exhibition regarding their presence in Northumbria, guarding our northern borders from the Picts, in autumn of this year in London. It contains recently unearthed personal documents of the Roman soldiers stationed there, letters home etc, very detailed, very personal, very human accounts of soldiers abroad by their own hands. There is a very good book recounting it.
January 17th, 2008  
perseus
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Endiminion
All of what that has been said about the romans is true, there has been a very important part skipped. Roman ingenuity. This is important because the romans more specifically took current technology and either integrated it or improved it. We can see this when we look at when rome was first forming. They looked upon their neighboring greeks to learn from them, as well as many other cultures.

The romans knew that greeks were a very intelligent people, so they captured them and made alot of them tutors for their children.
They also copied basic chain mail armor designs at first from the celtic tribes.
A very important weapon for the roman cohorts was the Gladius, which was originally a spanish design, which was occupied by the visigoths I believe. This was a great weapon because a well disciplined cohort would use this weapon only for stabbing.
The romans also knew not to use the gladius as a cavalry weapon because it was too short. so they adopted the gaulic spatha.
I also understand they copied the modular construction techniques of the Carthagian ships which eventually led to their dominance of the Mediterranean. They also took many of Hannibal's techniques and the conscripts themselves (eg. Numidian horsemen). Obviously Carthage had forgot to patent these!

However they failed to copy the techniques of the invading tribes of the East, was this due to their number, fierceness or what?