question about a German military item I have from 1912




 
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April 11th, 2010  
ironhunter
 

Topic: question about a German military item I have from 1912


Please accept my apologies if I am in the wrong forum to ask, but I have an item relating to the Infantry Regiment Graf Bose Nr. 31 that I would like to learn more about.

This is a Lenzkirch tall clock, serial number 800373. I believe that to be correct, although above the number is stamped "Lenzkirch 1 million."

What makes this clock significant to the 3rd Batallion, 31st Division (?) is the plaque inside the case. I would be happy to send a picture to anyone that would be willing to assist, but the plaque contains the following inscription:

"Dem Verein der Unteroffiziere des III Bataillons Infanterie Regiments Graf Bose (1. Thuringisches)
Nr. 31 zur 100
jahrigen Jubilaumsfeier des Regiments gewidmet von seinen
CHRENMITGLIEDERN"

After that is four columns of names with the headings "9. KOMP., 10. KOMP., 11. KOMP., 12. KOMP."



This clock also has "1812-1912" on the outside of the door in brass letters, along with III/31. At the top is a intricately-carved crown with a German cross atop a globe, and below that (on the face of the crown) is a christian cross flanked by two eagles (I assume they are eagles).

I have many questions and, since I don't read German or know a lot about pre-WW1 German military, I thought I could pick the brains of someone who might know. I understand that this particular regiment (?) was relocated to Hamburg in 1912. I assume this is possibly the significance of the year on the door of the clock. Also, the case of the clock was built by F. Albert Stephan in Hamburg, according to a metal tag inside the door.

Can someone translate the inscription on the plaque for me? I tried several online translators but some of the words, such as "CHRENMITGLIEDERN," do not translate to English and I can't figure out what the entire inscription means.

I was told that this clock was built and dedicated to this division on it's 100th anniversary, but if it was I can't figure out how it ended up in civilian hands. I purchased the clock from a reputable dealer in Germany and, other than the fact that it is a genuine Lenzkirch, he was unsure of the clock's history. I know it is possible that the plaque and all military stuff could have been added in an attempt to increase the value, but I bought the clock at about the price a genuine Lenzkirch tall clock would sell for. The prie was not jacked up because of the military stuff.

I appreciate any light that anyone might shed on this for me. I am not posting here to try and find a value, as I have no intentions of selling this clock. I would just like to know anything I can about how it came to be!
thanks
Ray Elkins
April 11th, 2010  
MontyB
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ironhunter
Please accept my apologies if I am in the wrong forum to ask, but I have an item relating to the Infantry Regiment Graf Bose Nr. 31 that I would like to learn more about.

This is a Lenzkirch tall clock, serial number 800373. I believe that to be correct, although above the number is stamped "Lenzkirch 1 million."

What makes this clock significant to the 3rd Batallion, 31st Division (?) is the plaque inside the case. I would be happy to send a picture to anyone that would be willing to assist, but the plaque contains the following inscription:

"Dem Verein der Unteroffiziere des III Bataillons Infanterie Regiments Graf Bose (1. Thuringisches)
Nr. 31 zur 100
jahrigen Jubilaumsfeier des Regiments gewidmet von seinen
CHRENMITGLIEDERN"

After that is four columns of names with the headings "9. KOMP., 10. KOMP., 11. KOMP., 12. KOMP."



This clock also has "1812-1912" on the outside of the door in brass letters, along with III/31. At the top is a intricately-carved crown with a German cross atop a globe, and below that (on the face of the crown) is a christian cross flanked by two eagles (I assume they are eagles).

I have many questions and, since I don't read German or know a lot about pre-WW1 German military, I thought I could pick the brains of someone who might know. I understand that this particular regiment (?) was relocated to Hamburg in 1912. I assume this is possibly the significance of the year on the door of the clock. Also, the case of the clock was built by F. Albert Stephan in Hamburg, according to a metal tag inside the door.

Can someone translate the inscription on the plaque for me? I tried several online translators but some of the words, such as "CHRENMITGLIEDERN," do not translate to English and I can't figure out what the entire inscription means.

I was told that this clock was built and dedicated to this division on it's 100th anniversary, but if it was I can't figure out how it ended up in civilian hands. I purchased the clock from a reputable dealer in Germany and, other than the fact that it is a genuine Lenzkirch, he was unsure of the clock's history. I know it is possible that the plaque and all military stuff could have been added in an attempt to increase the value, but I bought the clock at about the price a genuine Lenzkirch tall clock would sell for. The prie was not jacked up because of the military stuff.

I appreciate any light that anyone might shed on this for me. I am not posting here to try and find a value, as I have no intentions of selling this clock. I would just like to know anything I can about how it came to be!
thanks
Ray Elkins
This is a best guess because my German is not great (translation=terrible) so I am not sure whether this will help at all but it may get the ball rolling...

To the association of the noncommissioned officers III battalion infantry of regiment count Bose (1. Thuringisches)
No. 31 to 100
On the century jubilee of the regiment dedicated from his CHRENMITGLIEDERN


I really don't know what CHRENMITGLIEDERN is however MITGLIEDERN means member(s).

I am also assuming 1. Thuringisches is an indication of the units formation area ie Thuringia around Erfurt Germany.
April 11th, 2010  
ironhunter
 
thanks so much. That makes much more sense than what i was getting through online translation. I guess the fella that told me the clock was dedicated on the 100th anniversary was indeed correct.
thanks again!
Ray
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April 11th, 2010  
MontyB
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ironhunter
thanks so much. That makes much more sense than what i was getting through online translation. I guess the fella that told me the clock was dedicated on the 100th anniversary was indeed correct.
thanks again!
Ray
I think it worth remembering that my German is pretty awful, I can translate many words but I have a great deal of trouble in getting context right.

I have no doubt that one of the German members will give you a more accurate translation.
April 11th, 2010  
rattler
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by MontyB
.

To the association of the noncommissioned officers III battalion infantry of regiment count Bose (1. Thuringisches)
No. 31 to 100
On the century jubilee of the regiment dedicated from his CHRENMITGLIEDERN


I really don't know what CHRENMITGLIEDERN is however MITGLIEDERN means member(s).

I am also assuming 1. Thuringisches is an indication of the units formation area ie Thuringia around Erfurt Germany.
Monty got the ball rolling indeed, and in the correct direction:

"Ehrenmitglied" = "Honorary Member", I guess THe "C" in the beginning is misreading the "E". "von seinen Ehrenmitgliedern" means "by its honorary members".

Here what it should read in German, and translation to English (more or less like Monty had it):

"Dem Verein der Unteroffiziere des III Bataillons Infanterie Regiments Graf Bose (1. Thuringisches) Nr. 31 zur 100-jahrigen Jubilaumsfeier des Regiments gewidmet von seinen EHRENMITGLIEDERN"

"Dedicated by its honorary members to the NCO club of the 3rd Battalion of the (First Thuringian) Infantry Regiment number 31, "Graf Bose", for the occasion of the 100 years jubilee festivities of the Regiment"

Rattler
April 11th, 2010  
MontyB
 
 
Hehe as said I can translate many words but it is hard to put them into context.

I wasnt sure whether 100- jahrigen was 100 year or Centennial jubilee so I went with century.
April 11th, 2010  
ironhunter
 
Thanks to the both of you. Sorry about the typo, that was kinda ignorant on my part not to proofread it better. I found a 1912 publication concerning the celebration and bought it. It is in Hamburg and of course it is in German, so when I get that I can hopefully find out more about it. Hoping the publication mentions the clock!

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll...fvi%3D1&_rdc=1
April 12th, 2010  
MontyB
 
 
Nice find, it may however be a good chance to learn German.

April 12th, 2010  
ironhunter
 
lol, yeah since my wife is now planning 3 weeks in Germany this summer to dig deeper into the history of this clock. Our daughter's teacher can read and translate and said he'd be glad to, but I still think I need to learn a bit before we start digging around in the libraries of Hamburg and Altona!
 


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