Patton and the Ranger - Page 3




 
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Patton and the Ranger
 
February 15th, 2012  
BritinBritain
 
 
Patton and the Ranger
The Black Watch's primary recruiting areas are in Fife, Dundee, Angus and Perth and Kinross, with the Battalion Headquarters located at Balhousie Castle.

On 28 March 2006 The Black Watch (Royal Highland Regiment) was merged with other Scottish Infantry Battalions to form the Royal Regiment of Scotland.

The title of the battalion is now The Black Watch, 3rd Battalion The Royal Regiment of Scotland.

The values and traditions of The Black Watch live on in a new guise and in the autumn of 2011 The Black Watch, 3rd Battalion of The Royal Regiment of Scotland will be posted to Helmand Province in Afghanistan, currently one of the world's most exciting Theatres of War where it will display all of the fighting skill that has been the Regiment's hallmark since its formation in 1739. The Battalion will take part in the transition to Afghan led governance.

An interesting read is Lt-Col C C 'Mad Mitch' Mitchell and the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders.

In 1967 "Mad Mitch", as he was affectionately known, cut through the British policy of neutral peacekeeping in Aden by leading his Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders to retake the terrorist-dominated Crater district of the city.
On June 20 British forces had been repulsed from the district with the loss of 22 lives. Mitchell determined to reoccupy it, though he had been warned that 500 well-armed police mutineers and terrorists had taken up positions there and were prepared to fight.
On the night of July 3 he ordered Pipe Major Kenneth Robinson to sound the Regimental Charge, "Monymusk". As Mitchell recalled: "It is the most thrilling sound in the world to go into action with the pipes playing. It stirs the blood and reminds one of the heritage of Scotland and the Regiment. Best of all it frightens the enemy to death."
A burst of machine gun fire rattled out from the edge of the town, but the Pipe Major played on undeterred while his comrades flung themselves to the ground. None of them knew how much resistance would be encountered; as it turned out, the only man to be shot dead that night was an Arab who had been challenged and made to run away. The Treasury building containing the whole of the currency reserve for southern Arabia was taken from the police mutineers by negotiation. By the end of the night it was clear to Mitchell that his determination to push on into the Crater area had utterly demoralised the enemy.

He sensed success in the air. "To me that single moment in Crater was worth all my quarter century of soldiering", he said. At dawn on July 4 the pipes and drums sounded again from a rooftop overlooking Crater.

The Argylls kept the peace there for five months by terrifying the rebels. "They know that if they start trouble we'll blow their bloody heads off," was Mitchell's characteristic comment.

Of his style of leadership he said: "I took flamboyant risks in order to demonstrate to my own officers and NCOs that we led from the front." Not one British soldier was lost in the operation.

An interesting fact 75% of SAS troopers are Scottish. As ex SAS Sergeant Stone once said, "Cos we're hard bastards."
February 15th, 2012  
Trooper1854
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghostrider
Thank you,


Scotland has many different regiments, one of the most famous one is the Black Watch, were they recruited all over or "locally"?
With the Scots we have a major problem!
The Highlanders and Lowlanders don't get on!
So it would be difficult for a Lowland Scot, to join a Highland Regiment, and vice versa, not only would it be difficult it would be suicidal!
During the numerous revolts, civil wars and clan wars, not only were different clans on different sides, but to hedge their bets, clan leaders would order sons to fight on different sides, so he could claim to be on the winner's side no matter the outcome!
Canny peopl these Scots!
The Scots turbulent history has found its way into a lot of the traditions of their Regiments
The Foot Guards are funny about things like tradition too.
The Grenadier Guards and Coldstream Guards originate from Regiments that fought on opposite sides in the Civil War, so they "Don't get on".
During the annual Trooping of the Colour ceremony, they won't even stand next to each other!
February 15th, 2012  
BritinBritain
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trooper1854
With the Scots we have a major problem!
The Highlanders and Lowlanders don't get on!
So it would be difficult for a Lowland Scot, to join a Highland Regiment, and vice versa, not only would it be difficult it would be suicidal!
During the numerous revolts, civil wars and clan wars, not only were different clans on different sides, but to hedge their bets, clan leaders would order sons to fight on different sides, so he could claim to be on the winner's side no matter the outcome!
Canny peopl these Scots!
The Scots turbulent history has found its way into a lot of the traditions of their Regiments
The Foot Guards are funny about things like tradition too.
The Grenadier Guards and Coldstream Guards originate from Regiments that fought on opposite sides in the Civil War, so they "Don't get on".
During the annual Trooping of the Colour ceremony, they won't even stand next to each other!
If my memory is correct the Grenadier Guards wear a white plume on the left side of their bearskin as a mark of some dishonour (I cannot remember where or why). The Coldstream Guards wear a red plume. The old Royal Army Ordnance Corps also wore a dishonour on their cap badges. The three cannon are smaller then the three cannon balls above, because the regiment supplied the wrong size cannon balls to a certain battle. Again I cannot remember when and where.
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Patton and the Ranger
February 15th, 2012  
I3BrigPvSk
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trooper1854
With the Scots we have a major problem!
The Highlanders and Lowlanders don't get on!
So it would be difficult for a Lowland Scot, to join a Highland Regiment, and vice versa, not only would it be difficult it would be suicidal!
During the numerous revolts, civil wars and clan wars, not only were different clans on different sides, but to hedge their bets, clan leaders would order sons to fight on different sides, so he could claim to be on the winner's side no matter the outcome!
Canny peopl these Scots!
The Scots turbulent history has found its way into a lot of the traditions of their Regiments
The Foot Guards are funny about things like tradition too.
The Grenadier Guards and Coldstream Guards originate from Regiments that fought on opposite sides in the Civil War, so they "Don't get on".
During the annual Trooping of the Colour ceremony, they won't even stand next to each other!
I had a major problem with Scottish soldiers as well. When I went to Nijmegen I had a chat with Scottish soldiers and I still ponder what they said, I hope I said "Yes" and "No" at the right times.
February 15th, 2012  
Trooper1854
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by BritinAfrica
If my memory is correct the Grenadier Guards wear a white plume on the left side of their bearskin as a mark of some dishonour (I cannot remember where or why). The Coldstream Guards wear a red plume. The old Royal Army Ordnance Corps also wore a dishonour on their cap badges. The three cannon are smaller then the three cannon balls above, because the regiment supplied the wrong size cannon balls to a certain battle. Again I cannot remember when and where.
There's something similar with the Royal Artillery and Royal Engineers.
Some where in the dim and distant past some Long Range Snipers abbandoned their guns and the Sappers took over and manned the guns.
To mark this, the gunners had their white lanyards taken off them, which they used to fire the guns, and they were given to the Engineers, whose cruddy old blue lanyards were given to the Gunners.
The bearskins were only worn by the Guards after Waterloo.
They were the head wear of Napoleon's Old Guard, and the British troops collected them as souvenirs after the battle.
Their Colonel liked the look of the bearskin and got his soldiers to wear them in place of the old stove pipe shakos.
February 15th, 2012  
42RM
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by BritinAfrica
An interesting fact 75% of SAS troopers are Scottish
It explains why all people in the town of Hereford have eleven toes and play the theme tune from the film Deliverance on the banjo.
February 16th, 2012  
I3BrigPvSk
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trooper1854
With the Scots we have a major problem!
The Highlanders and Lowlanders don't get on!
So it would be difficult for a Lowland Scot, to join a Highland Regiment, and vice versa, not only would it be difficult it would be suicidal!
During the numerous revolts, civil wars and clan wars, not only were different clans on different sides, but to hedge their bets, clan leaders would order sons to fight on different sides, so he could claim to be on the winner's side no matter the outcome!
Canny peopl these Scots!
The Scots turbulent history has found its way into a lot of the traditions of their Regiments
The Foot Guards are funny about things like tradition too.
The Grenadier Guards and Coldstream Guards originate from Regiments that fought on opposite sides in the Civil War, so they "Don't get on".
During the annual Trooping of the Colour ceremony, they won't even stand next to each other!
This hostility between the two regiments must have been complicated to handle for the high command during the dual world wars, so how did high command, or what term you are using in GB handled it during these wars?
February 16th, 2012  
Trooper1854
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghostrider
This hostility between the two regiments must have been complicated to handle for the high command during the dual world wars, so how did high command, or what term you are using in GB handled it during these wars?
These guys are extremely proffesional soldiers and, like all Regiments in the British Army, they have a pride in their history and traditions.
In times of war, and in actual combat, they fight the enemy.
The problems occur when they meet when they are off duty.
Insults are traded and fists will fly.
In some Regiments, there is even rivalry between Battalions, and in some cases companies!
In the old days when it was the Regimental Depot for the Paras, if you wanted to see a good punch up, be in Aldershot town centre when any two of the Parachute Regiment's Battalions were on camp.
Same in Bassingbourne, Colchester, Catterick, or any other garrison town.
These men have a fierce pride in their Regiment, Battalion and Company and the slightest slur to their honour will cause a massive brawl.
Get them together on the battlefield, they are the best of mates.
The only problems the Generals had was keeping them away from each ther when on R&R!
In World War One, Irish Nationalists and Republicans were happy to forget their differences and fight alongside each other for the duration.
Then carry on fighting each other afterwards.
We're a funny old bunch
February 17th, 2012  
I3BrigPvSk
 
 
The British army has a regiment, the Blues and Royals, I believe is their name, they went to Falklands, I think.

I have never read anything about the origin of the regiments in the BA, seen their names from time to time. The Royal Artillery, is the Royal Horse Artillery different or the same?

This is interesting to read about the different units in the British army. When we now know where the USMC come from, does the RM have a similar background?
February 17th, 2012  
BritinBritain
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghostrider
The British army has a regiment, the Blues and Royals, I believe is their name, they went to Falklands, I think.
There are two household cavalry units, the Blues and Royals and the Life Guards. The Blues and Royals wear a blue tunic, while the Life Guards wear red. The Blues and Royals can trace their origins back to Oliver Cromwell's "New Model Army." They did indeed serve in the Falklands as well as Bosnia and today in Afghansitan.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghostrider
I have never read anything about the origin of the regiments in the BA, seen their names from time to time. The Royal Artillery, is the Royal Horse Artillery different or the same?
The Royal Artillery and the Royal Horse Artillery are two different regiments, but the Royal Horse Artillery (dating from 1793) form part of the Royal Artillery (confusing isn't it? lol). My uncle Roy served in the Royal Horse Artillery during WW2, he was also one of the regiment who was evacuated from Dunkirk after the regiment spiked their guns. Originally the regiment went into battle using horse's to tow the limber and gun. The Royal Horse Artillery still fire the salutes on ceremonial duties.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghostrider
This is interesting to read about the different units in the British army. When we now know where the USMC come from, does the RM have a similar background?
You'll have to ask 03USMC and 42RM, but from what I have heard they are somehow related.