Obliterating Islamic State (ISIS) - Page 41




 
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Boots
 
March 29th, 2017  
MontyB
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tuan
We can argue in many different ways on the causes and consequences of modern terrorism, but old Marxist theory has become a new "relative deprivation theory" at the dawn of new millennium, which drives people to push back against their opponents.

Remember, "change is the law of the universe".....here is an academic article

Relative Deprivation Theory in Terrorism: A Study of Higher Education and
Unemployment as Predictors of Terrorism

http://politics.as.nyu.edu/docs/IO/4..._terrorism.pdf
It is an interesting paper but in some respects, I think it shoots itself down unnecessarily as it continually mentions its low sample group as a reason it may be wrong, whereas it should also be accepted that the number of terrorists worldwide is still a very small number as a proportion of the world's population.

Also, the ability to gather data from suicide bombers as to what is motivating them is rather difficult given that it really is a short-term job.

On the whole I think it is a pretty well thought out paper which I think shows what we have been saying in that their motivation is determined by many factors including a real and perceived sense of inequality.
March 30th, 2017  
I3BrigPvSk
 
 
It might be be interesting to read what Criminologists are saying about why some decide to be terrorists.

Personally, I think why some decide to join ISIS or any other organization is a mix of many different reasons. If we ask 100 ISIS fighters and supporters, we can get a variety of reasons.
March 31st, 2017  
I3BrigPvSk
 
 
A short article about the terrorist personality by an Indian criminologist

http://www.globalindiafoundation.org/terrorism.pdf

Another article

Understanding Terrorist Psychology

http://scholarcommons.usf.edu/cgi/vi...xt=mhlp_facpub

The articles describe a similar pattern of those who became members of other criminal gangs and groups. Although, isn't that a better approach? Terrorists are just criminals, similar as those engaging in other organized criminal behavior. Groups and gangs active in drug trafficking and arms trafficking are maybe even more dangerous for the society than what terrorists are.
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Boots
April 1st, 2017  
MontyB
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by I3BrigPvSk
A short article about the terrorist personality by an Indian criminologist

http://www.globalindiafoundation.org/terrorism.pdf

Another article

Understanding Terrorist Psychology

http://scholarcommons.usf.edu/cgi/vi...xt=mhlp_facpub

The articles describe a similar pattern of those who became members of other criminal gangs and groups. Although, isn't that a better approach? Terrorists are just criminals, similar as those engaging in other organized criminal behavior. Groups and gangs active in drug trafficking and arms trafficking are maybe even more dangerous for the society than what terrorists are.
I have argued that the word "terrorist" is itself a recruiting tool and should simply be replaced with criminal, far too many want to think of themselves as the biggest, baddest guy on the block and as such are drawn to emotive titles like terrorist especially since terrorism is such a grey area (one mans terrorist is another's freedom fighter).
April 1st, 2017  
lljadw
 
The peace Corps was a failure : it did not create any goodwill in the underdevelopped countries,but increased the hostility to the US .
April 1st, 2017  
MontyB
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by lljadw
The peace Corps was a failure : it did not create any goodwill in the underdevelopped countries,but increased the hostility to the US .
I have found nothing to indicate that the Peace Corps increased hostility to the US, in areas it was certainly ineffective but given that it has one of the smallest budgets of any agency doing that work that should be expected.

However, surveys in host countries indicated that Americans received an increase in favourability from around 15% to 70% because of the work done by the Peace Corps.
April 2nd, 2017  
Tuan
 
 
ISIS Hostage-Taking Caught on Video; Mosul Deaths Go To Formal Investigation

Quote:
WASHINGTON, March 30, 2017 — A formal investigation has begun into the March 17 deaths of civilians in western Mosul, Iraq, the Combined Joint Task Force Operation Inherent Resolve spokesman said today.

Addressing Pentagon reporters by teleconference, Army Col. Joseph Scrocca said OIR commander Army Lt. Gen. Stephen Townsend directed that the investigation get underway rather than continue with the credibility assessments.

Scrocca said the U.S.-led coalition airstrikes in mid-March left the coalition with some culpability and it would be disingenuous to continue with credibility assessments.

“Since we believe a coalition strike contributed in at least some way to the civilian casualties, Lt. Gen. Townsend has directed that the civilian casualty assessment move directly to a formal 15-6 investigation for all allegations in the west Mosul neighborhood where the strikes occurred on or around March 17,” he said.

A full investigation will allow OIR to analyze other aspects of the case that have significant bearing, such as strike procedures and the impact of ISIS tactics, Scrocca said.

The investigating officer also can make recommendations to the commander to adjust and improve operations in western Mosul, he added.
On another note, I hear a good news about, Ayad al-Jumaili, believed to be a deputy of ISIS leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, was killed in an airstrike on Friday, according to an Iraqi intelligence spokesman.

The U.S.-led coalition against the ISIS said it was unable at the moment to confirm the information that was reported earlier in the day by Iraqi state-run TV.

Feel free to share info on this....i mean any open source item...the UK mirror reported the following:

ISIS' second-in-command 'who was in charge of terror group's internal security killed in air strike'
April 2nd, 2017  
Tuan
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by MontyB
I have argued that the word "terrorist" is itself a recruiting tool and should simply be replaced with criminal, far too many want to think of themselves as the biggest, baddest guy on the block and as such are drawn to emotive titles like terrorist especially since terrorism is such a grey area (one mans terrorist is another's freedom fighter).
There is a difference between the two though. Generally speaking, while a terrorist's motive is political, a criminal on the other hand is driven by economic motive...just my thought.
April 2nd, 2017  
MontyB
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tuan
There is a difference between the two though. Generally speaking, while a terrorist's motive is political, a criminal on the other hand is driven by economic motive...just my thought.
I tend to see that as semantics and it somewhat proves my point, take the Robin Hood analogy we are told to admire him because his motives were what we are taught to be right, aiding the poor by fighting tyrants what greater calling can there be.

Yet in reality, to the wealthy he was not picky about who he robbed and attacked anyone with money no matter how they had attained it or what they had done with it, he was a criminal, little more than a murderer and a thief.

So who is right?
If the motive is all that matters then it becomes almost impossible to convict some of greatest mass murderers of our time, Hitler, Stalin, Mao, Pol Pot all believed they were doing the right thing and cost was irrelevant.

This I believe is why the law is designed to be blind hence lady justice is blindfolded as justice is or should be meted out objectively, without fear or favour, regardless of identity, money, power, or weakness, it must be structured to be impartial.

Motive should play no part in determining whether an action is a crime or not and should only be considered once that determination has been made.
April 2nd, 2017  
I3BrigPvSk
 
 
I agree with Monty on this one. Terrorists are simply only criminals and shall be treated as such. The best approach is to reduce the recruiting base for the terrorist organizations. If we can do something about grievances in our societies and even abroad. But the latter one is not our responsibility, that is the leadership in these countries responsibility.

There are another perceptions as well. We can stop intervening in their countries. However, that might causes some problems. We can get a huge amount of refugees and we got a lot of them. As long as the issues don't influence us, we can ignore it.

How did democracy and human rights emerge in the West? It occurred from within and it was a bloody struggle with revolutions, wars, and other setbacks. But it emerged from within and sometimes as a result of a war. The social revolution during the industrial revolution and the social change after the First World War. Maybe many of the countries in the Middle East and Africa need to go through a similar process. One issue that might need to be addressed is the high level of corruption in many of these countries.
 


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