Obliterating Islamic State (ISIS) - Page 4




 
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Boots
 
October 13th, 2015  
JOC
 
 
I wish Turkey (supposed NATO Ally) would support an all out air war on ISIS instead of a few limited US attacks from carriers in the Gulf. Which coast the US a fortune. They have the major air bases on the border. I believe Obama is a bit weak here as well. I've expressed this viewpoint many times on the forum. This could destroy ISIS's heavy equipment and AFV's as well as decimating them when they assembled to attack. Planes like the Warthog could do a lot of damage. This would not be enough to completely destroy ISIS but would cripple their stand up fighting ability. I'm a Christian and ISIS basically wipes out the Christians in areas that they take over.
October 13th, 2015  
MontyB
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by I3BrigPvSk
I have been thinking in lines like this as well. Assad is the best option to get stability in Syria. The major problem is ISIS and similar groups and they need to go without creating a power vacuum and a failed state a la Somalia.

The first priority is the get rid off ISIS, and it doesn't matter who does it.

Assad might be dealt with later, maybe in the similar way as what happened to the military and political leadership after the wars and ethnic cleansing in the Balkans.
Indeed, it does not matter who takes power in Syria the other side is going to suffer so support Assad and rebel supporters live in fear or support the rebels and Assad supporters get the short end of the stick.

I think the Russians are doing the right thing in picking a single group to win this thing rather than backing loosely affiliated groups who like Libya will fall apart and be shooting at each other the second Assad is out of the picture.
October 13th, 2015  
Tuan
 
 
Some observers, including Sen. John McCain, have described the ongoing escalation as a "proxy war" between the United States and Russia since the end of Cold War, however , IMO, the so called "cold war" had never ended, rather it was diminished to some extent...apparently it is still very "hot war"

U.S., Russia escalate involvement in Syria
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Boots
October 14th, 2015  
MontyB
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tuan
Some observers, including Sen. John McCain, have described the ongoing escalation as a "proxy war" between the United States and Russia since the end of Cold War, however , IMO, the so called "cold war" had never ended, rather it was diminished to some extent...apparently it is still very "hot war"

U.S., Russia escalate involvement in Syria
I am not sure McCain can be described as an observer as much like Victoria Nuland every where they go seems to erupt into civil war a few weeks later.
October 18th, 2015  
lljadw
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tuan
Some observers, including Sen. John McCain, have described the ongoing escalation as a "proxy war" between the United States and Russia since the end of Cold War, however , IMO, the so called "cold war" had never ended, rather it was diminished to some extent...apparently it is still very "hot war"

U.S., Russia escalate involvement in Syria
The Cold War is over,Russia is only a poor shadow of the SU.Now we have WWIII= the war against Muslim extremism,and if there was any one in Washington with the brains of a bacteria,he would cooperate with Russia .
October 19th, 2015  
JOC
 
 
We're dealing with Muslim extremist - terrorist on several fronts. How can you compare this to a WW2? In WW2 perhaps 60 million died - killed in the European theater. The war created as many as 20 million European refugees. Such all out war has not been seen since and hopefully won't be again. Grant you ISIS is a band of bloody butchers however lets compare apples to apples. I meet Muslims while in the service. They were from Arabia and were respectful disciplined soldiers.
October 20th, 2015  
lljadw
 
Ah,you will wait til the terrorists have murdered millions before call it WWIII?
October 21st, 2015  
JOC
 
 
I'm sure they would if they could, but the can't. They are not a treat of this caliber. So why give way to this mania for exaggeration.
October 29th, 2015  
Tuan
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by lljadw
The Cold War is over,Russia is only a poor shadow of the SU.Now we have WWIII= the war against Muslim extremism,and if there was any one in Washington with the brains of a bacteria,he would cooperate with Russia .
I disagree because the present day ISIS is an offshoot of Al Qaeda; and Al Qaeda is an offshoot of Afghan Mujahedeen (and we all know whose brainchild the Afghan Mujahedeen was). Therefore what happened in 9/11 and the subsequent war on terror that began again (back to square one) in Afghanistan, Iraq invasion and such are interconnected and byproduct of cold war era protracted proxy wars, in my opinion.

According to Wikipedia, the modern phenomenon of jihadism that presents "jihad" (offensive or defensive) as the casus belli for insurgencies, guerrilla warfare and international terrorism, dates back to the 1960s and draws on early-to-mid-20th century Islamist doctrines such as Qutbism.
October 29th, 2015  
Tuan
 
 
Canada's new PM is right: Bombs won't beat ISIS
http://www.cnn.com/2015/10/23/opinio...eau/index.html

Quote:
Justin Trudeau's campaign promise to end the bombing mission, while continuing to train Iraqis away from the front lines, represented a balanced approach to recognizing the complexity of the Syrian conflict and the limited options available to the West.

While counterterrorism is most often linked with the exercise of "hard power" (intelligence, law, policing, and military power), it must increasingly make use of "soft power" (political, social, and economic control, together with broader policy initiatives dealing with the environment, development, critical infrastructure, migration, and humanitarian intervention).

The Syrian conflict has its roots in a volatile mix of discriminatory practices by government, widespread corruption, chronic lack of opportunity for young people, lack of essential services, all combined to convince many that there is no alternative other than violent extremism and terrorism. A strictly military approach to such a complex situation is dangerously reductionist. As the great American psychologist, Abraham Maslow, wrote in 1966: "I suppose it is tempting, if the only tool you have is a hammer, to treat everything as if it were a nail."

The Sunni Arabs of Iraq and Syria support ISIS only because they have no other option in a divided and discriminatory environment where Shia governments favor their own, with support from Iran and Hezbollah, and Kurds enjoy the support of the U.S. and its allies (to Turkey's great chagrin).

Because ISIS is the only Sunni force capable of confronting the Shia forces in both Iraq and Syria, it receives varying degrees of support from neighboring Sunni states, particularly Saudi Arabia. The Syrian conflict is in many ways a proxy war between Iran and Saudi Arabia, and threatens to become a kind of proxy Cold War between Russia and the U.S.

Political, economic, social, humanitarian, and diplomatic initiatives are urgently needed if a long-lasting solution is to be found. With Russia entering the fray on the side of Bashar al-Assad, and supposedly moderate rebels less and less capable of sustained and effective combat, as well as increasing waves of desperate refugees fleeing rapidly escalating violence, with no end in sight, a comprehensive approach is all the more imperative.

Justin Trudeau's decision to end Canada's participation in the bombing campaign against ISIS is a step in the right direction.
 


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