Obliterating Islamic State (ISIS) - Page 36




 
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Boots
 
March 16th, 2016  
MontyB
 
 
Not so sure about that as a lot of Turks I have spoken too in the last two years in particular are very aware of the issues and are growing more and more concerned about the accumulation of power and dirrection Erdogan is taking.

The problem that they face in this attempt to play both sides of the argument here (supporting NATO and handing oil sales for ISIS) is that they are making no friends and losing the trust of those they currently have, a large number of those I know are worried about the likelyhood of some serious unrest breaking out.

In my opinion Turkey will not be the winner as the Kurds grow stronger and more "internationally" acceptable and Erdogan leds Turkey away from a secular nation towards an Islamic one.
March 17th, 2016  
JOC
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by MontyB
Not so sure about that as a lot of Turks I have spoken too in the last two years in particular are very aware of the issues and are growing more and more concerned about the accumulation of power and dirrection Erdogan is taking.

The problem that they face in this attempt to play both sides of the argument here (supporting NATO and handing oil sales for ISIS) is that they are making no friends and losing the trust of those they currently have, a large number of those I know are worried about the likelyhood of some serious unrest breaking out.

In my opinion Turkey will not be the winner as the Kurds grow stronger and more "internationally" acceptable and Erdogan leds Turkey away from a secular nation towards an Islamic one.


Turkey will find it hard to please NATO and the EuropeanUnion and continue a war of terror against the Kurds. A war that theinternational community largely ignores. Erdogan in particular is in favor of a heavy handed approach when dealing with the Kurds.
They could help in the war against ISIS in so many ways but wonít forthe most part because it could strengthen the Kurds.

June 5th, 2016  
Tuan
 
 
Meet the man saving Yazidi slaves from ISIS
http://www.cnn.com/2016/06/02/middle...sis/index.html

Quote:
Dileen (not her real name) is one of those rescued by Shrem and his team of smugglers.

She was separated from her husband when ISIS militants overran Sinjar province. The last time she saw him he was being marched away, hands up, with the other men from their village.

She and her children were taken to Mosul with the women and girls. "They separated the ones who were really pretty, and made us remove our headscarves to see the prettiest ones," she says.

They were moved from place to place within ISIS territory: Mosul, Tal Afar, Raqqa, and finally to Tishrin, where, she says, she was sold to an ISIS fighter, who raped her repeatedly.

"They forced me, and they threatened my children," she says, recalling the five months she spent trapped in his home.

ISIS claims the Quran justifies taking non-Muslim women and girls captive, and permits their rape -- a claim vociferously denied by Islamic scholars.

While Dileen was used as a sex slave, her daughter Aisha (not her real name), who is just seven years old, was forced to work late into the night, in the basement of their apartment building, assembling IEDs for ISIS.

"I used to make bombs," says Aisha, quietly, playing with her hair. "There was a girl my age and her mother. They threatened to kill [the girl] if I wouldn't go and work with them," she told CNN.

"They would dress us in all black and there was a yellow material and sugar and a powder, and we would weigh them on a scale and then we would heat them and pack the artillery."

An ISIS militant, she says, would then add the detonation wires.
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Boots
June 6th, 2016  
Tuan
 
 
ISIS shooting civilians trying to flee Falluja, NGO says
http://www.cnn.com/2016/06/06/middle...sis/index.html

Quote:
(CNN)ISIS is targeting civilians attempting to leave the militant-held city of Falluja, as Iraqi forces and militia attempt to wrest back control of the city, a European non-profit operating in Iraq says.

As many as 50,000 residents remain trapped in the center of Falluja as Iraqi security forces close in, the Norwegian Refugee Council (NRC) told CNN Monday. Many of those who try to escape the clutches of ISIS are being targeted and shot by militants, it said.

"Our biggest fears are now tragically confirmed with civilians being directly targeted while trying to flee to safety," NRC Country Director in Iraq Nasr Muflahi said.

"This is the worst that we feared would happen to innocent men, women and children who have had to leave everything behind in order to save their lives."

Falluja, which lies 65 km (40 miles) from the capital Baghdad, has been held by the militant group since 2014, and is the subject of a concerted push to retake ISIS-controlled territory across Iraq and Syria.

Almost 3,000 families have safely escaped the city since late May, the NRC said. Most are being housed in displacement camps, and the NRC has warned of water shortages should the tens of thousands remaining in Falluja manage to escape.
June 12th, 2016  
Tuan
 
 
ISIS-inspired board game helps Canadian military with planning
http://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/isis...nada-1.3625142

Quote:
Canada's military has been experimenting with a tabletop game inspired by the war against ISIS to help plan what tanks, planes, ships and people it needs to fight effectively in the coming decades.

The ISIS Crisis uses dice, markers and a large map of Iraq and Syria, and is the latest twist in a government-wide effort to use more games in the workplace for training and education.

"This certainly does have potential to add additional rigour to our process," said Col. Ross Ermel, in charge of a directorate that plans how the Canadian Forces must evolve.

"It does show some promise.Ö It's one of the things that we are certainly considering."

The ISIS Crisis game takes up to six players, includes dice and a map, and is quicker and cheaper to run than traditional war games, says the Canadian military. (PAXsims)

The ISIS Crisis is known as a matrix-type game, a concept dating from the 1980s, with minimal rules and using debates and arguments, unlike traditional war games with complex rules and drawing on probabilities.

Matrix games allow complex, multi-sided issues to be explored, often by up to six players who don't need particular expertise in the subject matter.

The ISIS Crisis was created by Rex Brynen, a political science professor at McGill University, who developed the roles and scenario rules, and by a British major, Tom Mouat, who created the map and counters. Brynen also acted as a kind of referee for the Canadian military sessions.

Outside the box

Matrix games are useful for helping military planners think creatively because the play can inspire unexpected innovations, says Brynen.

"There's a bit of a tendency to fight the previous war," he says of problems attached to traditional, rule-bound military war-gaming.

And unlike old-style war games, matrix games such as The ISIS Crisis can be set up cheaply and quickly, and played over three to four hours.

"It's quick and dirty," Brynen said. "Big war games can take months to set up and cost an awful lot of money."

The ISIS Crisis is only the latest gaming experiment in the federal government, which has been late to so-called "gamification" trends. The private sector has been using computer-based games for training for several years, recognizing their efficiency and effectiveness, especially among younger workers.

Using two suppliers, Quebec-based Ellicom and Ottawa-based Launchfire, computer-based games were used to teach workers about digital security on department networks.

"This is an effective and desired method of learning Ö we should embrace gamified learning as a viable alternative to traditional methods, says a November 2015 report on the results, obtained under the Access to Information Act.

"It doesn't feel like work when you're earning points, reaching new levels and getting to the top of the leaderboard."

Some government planners say gaming may also have potential for directly engaging citizens.

Ermel says his military-planning unit, which has never before played matrix-type games, is using The ISIS Crisis to "stress test" forecasting methodology rather than to predict Mideast events or any long-term Canadian role in the region.

The planners use 10 potential scenarios, from routine operations in the Arctic to all-out war, to estimate what the Canadian Forces will need to function 30 years down the road. Adding a matrix-type game to the process can help keep the military aware of potential innovations introduced by adversaries.

Other contexts

The Canadian Forces will decide in the fall whether to make the game a regular part of its planning process, Ermel said.


"It has also been used analytically in certain national security communities, so that kind of game format was used for security planning for the Vancouver Olympics," he said in an interview.

Last month, Brynen ran another board-game session for the military to explore responses to a humanitarian crisis caused by an earthquake in the fictional country of Carana.

The game, called Aftershock, is designed for up to eight players and takes about two hours to play.
June 14th, 2016  
MontyB
 
 
I cant help but think people are over thinking this problem.

I am not sure I see the point to anything involving dice regarding this issue, sure it adds an element of "randomness" to the scenario but our militaries are trained to adapt to these situations anyway, I highly doubt there are people in a bunker somewhere going "oh shit IS just rolled a 5 on their D+1 Sniper we are going to need a 6 or better and the helm of invulnerability get him now", or at least I hope there isn't however given how this has gone so far maybe there is.

I think this sort of thing is just "busy work" designed to avoid the unplesant reality that to "obliterate Islamic State" they must be engaged and destroyed.

Who knows maybe this is just one giant LARPing festival that has gone on too long.
August 28th, 2016  
Tuan
 
 
"Israel is the only country in the world that Isis fears, according to the first Western journalist to enter the groupís territories and survive."

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/wo...=facebook-post
August 31st, 2016  
MontyB
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tuan
"Israel is the only country in the world that Isis fears, according to the first Western journalist to enter the groupís territories and survive."

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/wo...=facebook-post

This would be the same Israel that Hamas has ground to a halt twice in the last 5 years, I would suggest that any fear of Israel is more in the knowledge that if there are a bigger more brutal bunch of parasitic thugs out there than ISIS is it Israel.

They should also take some note of the fact that if any of the world's developed military powers seriously wanted ISIS gone their "caliphate" would be a distant memory within weeks.

Personally, though I would be prepared to bet that Mr Todenhoefer was playing to his audience which in this case was Israeli (Jewish News is a British subsidiary of The Israeli Times).
September 1st, 2016  
Tuan
 
 
Quote:
This would be the same Israel that Hamas has ground to a halt twice in the last 5 years, I would suggest that any fear of Israel is more in the knowledge that if there are a bigger more brutal bunch of parasitic thugs out there than ISIS is it Israel
Not necessarily. I believe the reason why is that unlike USA and UK, Israel possesses enormous experience in counterterrorism, counterinsurgency and counterintelligence, as they live with its consequences on a daily basis. And most of all, they don't give a damn about rules of engagement when it comes to terrorists.
September 1st, 2016  
LeEnfield
 
 
With ISIS they expect to go heaven when they die, were they will be better off, now if you stop them from going there they would be less inclined to die. Now if collect their remains and bury them in a pig skin then they are unclean and can't go there.
When I was in Calais the other day I saw British lorry drivers tying pigs feet to the handles on the back of there trucks to stop the Muslims opening the doors to get on there lorry and try and make their way to the UK, Well they took one look and then tried to find another lorry.
 


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