non american wanting to join the u.s army




 
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June 16th, 2010  
silentrunner
 

Topic: non american wanting to join the u.s army


i've always wanted to join the u.s army but the problem is im a british citizen i have some family there and my uncle in law was a paratrooper and he's told me all about his time in the army and it really got me thinking about joining more then before but is it possible for me to do soo ? it would be a great help if you lot could gimmie some info
June 17th, 2010  
Infantry Two seven
 
You need green card to join US army and If you want to be a officer you need to be an American citizen. If I were you I'd stick with the British army. Brit army also pays better.
If I had a choice between Brit army and US army it would definitely be Brit army.
my humble opinion.
June 17th, 2010  
silentrunner
 
yeah i see what you are saying
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June 18th, 2010  
A Can of Man
 
 
Can't Brits join Commonwealth Armies? Because Commonwealth citizens can join the British military.
August 16th, 2010  
AussieNick
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by A Can of Man
Can't Brits join Commonwealth Armies? Because Commonwealth citizens can join the British military.
Eh?

That's not right. We've got plenty of Brits in the Australian Army. They like it here because the pay is better and the weather is warmer.

Most are lateral transfers though.
August 16th, 2010  
A Can of Man
 
 
Yeah, what I meant as citizens of certain Commonwealth countries could serve in either's militaries.
I've seen it happen, just how it happens, I'm not entirely sure.
If most are lateral transfers, does that mean that some can actually join directly as non-Australians without any military experience?
September 7th, 2010  
AussieNick
 
Well, you can't join the Australian Army if you aren't an Australian Citizen or a permanent resident, unless you have previous military experience.

But when it comes down to it, it is far easier for a British/NZ/Canadian to get permanent residence in Australia, and once you've got residency you need to serve either 90 days in the regular forces or 6 months in the Reserve to waive residency requirements.

Lateral transfers are when you transfer directly from one army to another. We seem to get a lot of British NCO's (especially SGT's) these days.
September 7th, 2010  
A Can of Man
 
 
Ahh ok.
Yeah the process always looks easier if you're not the one going through it.
September 8th, 2010  
AussieNick
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by A Can of Man
Ahh ok.
Yeah the process always looks easier if you're not the one going through it.
Exactly!

And no matter what, always remember that the Army is just another government department... so don't expect anything to happen quickly.
September 8th, 2010  
mocco
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by A Can of Man
Yeah, what I meant as citizens of certain Commonwealth countries could serve in either's militaries.
I've seen it happen, just how it happens, I'm not entirely sure.
If most are lateral transfers, does that mean that some can actually join directly as non-Australians without any military experience?
I had guys in my unit who were ex UK who having moved here joined up, we also had a guy from PNG as well..... In fact I was always under the impression that as commonwealth citizens, we were entitled to enlist with any UK or CW force.....

@aussienick - just read your explanation, now I get how it's done.... and because these boys were ex services, that explains how they were in, despite holding their existing citizenship....
 


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