Napalm the bocage!




 
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December 13th, 2011  
samneanderthal
 

Topic: Napalm the bocage!


The Normandy bocage cost 40,000 casualties, invaluable time, lots of tanks, ammo, etc,
Since the Germans were hiding in thick, flammable vegetation, why not set fire to it with napalm, which the navy used extensibly in the Pacific? This would have both eliminated the obstacle and the German troops and equipment.
December 14th, 2011  
BritinAfrica
 
 
I dunno, maybe you can tell us why they didn't. Maybe it was because the British told them not to, so it was their fault?
December 14th, 2011  
42RM
 
Both phosphor and napalm was used frequently in Normandy.
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December 14th, 2011  
BritinAfrica
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by 42RM
Both phosphor and napalm was used frequently in Normandy.
See you bloody know it all samneanderthal, they DID use napalm. So this time you can't blame the British.
December 14th, 2011  
MontyB
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by samneanderthal
The Normandy bocage cost 40,000 casualties, invaluable time, lots of tanks, ammo, etc,
Since the Germans were hiding in thick, flammable vegetation, why not set fire to it with napalm, which the navy used extensibly in the Pacific? This would have both eliminated the obstacle and the German troops and equipment.
I assume it received limited use in the area because of the close proximity of the fighting.
December 14th, 2011  
42RM
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by MontyB
I assume it received limited use in the area because of the close proximity of the fighting.
Napalm was developed at Harvard University in 1942-43 by a team of chemists led by chemistry professor Louis F. Fieser, so in 1944 it was a new weapon.

On July 17, 1944 Napalm bombs were dropped for the first time by American P-38 pilots on a fuel depot at Coutances, near St. Lô, France.

The German word "bombenbrandschrumpfeichen" was created in response to napalm bombing of German bunkers. Soldiers in bunkers would be baked by the heat, and the word means "firebomb shrunken flesh.
December 14th, 2011  
MontyB
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by 42RM
Napalm was developed at Harvard University in 1942-43 by a team of chemists led by chemistry professor Louis F. Fieser, so in 1944 it was a new weapon.

On July 17, 1944 Napalm bombs were dropped for the first time by American P-38 pilots on a fuel depot at Coutances, near St. Lô, France.

The German word "bombenbrandschrumpfeichen" was created in response to napalm bombing of German bunkers. Soldiers in bunkers would be baked by the heat, and the word means "firebomb shrunken flesh.
Yep I know it was developed and used during WW2 in both theatres but I am suggesting that the answer to Sams question is that delivery inaccuracies and the close nature of the fighting between troops meant that it probably wasn't the best weapon in Bocage country.
December 14th, 2011  
42RM
 
It could be a possible answer,since a large amount of carbon monoxide is produced once a napalm bomb is set off. When Napalm ignites Oxygen is replaced with carbon monoxide as a result of incomplete combustion.
December 14th, 2011  
lljadw
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by BritinAfrica
See you bloody know it all samneanderthal, they DID use napalm. So this time you can't blame the British.
wrong :he always can blame the British,and he always will
December 14th, 2011  
LeEnfield
 
 
Quite often the only thing that separated the two sides was the thickness of a hedge. By using Napalm you would have wound up killing as many of your men as you did of theres. Napalm covers quite a wide area when it is dropped let alone large drops of it that are thrown out on impact.
 


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