Napalm the bocage! - Page 16




 
--
 
December 24th, 2011  
LeEnfield
 
 
Yes thousands of Boers did die in Civilian prison camps run by the British yet as soon as this hit the British press there was a hell of an out cry and heads rolled. It was one senior officer who thought he was doing a good job in making them suffer. There is nothing worse than an armchair warrior seeking glory in his own way.

We did not starve millions of Irish people, there was a potato blight which destroyed their crops, yes more could have been done to help, but millions just up sticks and came to Briton and many other places over the world. Of course there was no hunger or starvation in Britain in those days was there
December 24th, 2011  
VDKMS
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by samneanderthal
It is time to move on. Nobody talks about Julius Caesar murdering and enslaving millions of Gauls, Napoleon murdering thousands of Turkish prisoners by forcing them to drown lest they be stuck by a bayonet, and then tens of thousands of people in every country he occupied, the Belgian atrocities in the Congo, the Turkish massacring the Arminians, the Americans murdering most of the Indians, even the very civilized and peaceful Cherokees, who were promptly displaced from their land when gold was discovered, the British starving thousands of Boer women and children in concentration camps, the British starving millions of Irish people, the British exterminating indians by distributing blankets contaminated with smallpox, the British allowing millions of Indians to starve in WW II, the Tootsies in Rwanda (where the UN refused to call it genocide, because it would have forced them to do something about it), etc,
You cannot look at history with glasses of today.
December 24th, 2011  
VDKMS
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by 84RFK
What have we learned from the autrocities in the nazi concentration camps?
And regarding the principle, are we really better than the nazi's?
There's a difference between putting someone in prison who might be guilty and released after he is found innocent (or guilty but not able to prove it) and putting an innocent civilian into prison with the intention to kill him. I think that the "nazi" word is used to liberally.
--
December 24th, 2011  
VDKMS
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by LeEnfield
Yes thousands of Boers did die in Civilian prison camps run by the British yet as soon as this hit the British press there was a hell of an out cry and heads rolled. It was one senior officer who thought he was doing a good job in making them suffer. There is nothing worse than an armchair warrior seeking glory in his own way.

We did not starve millions of Irish people, there was a potato blight which destroyed their crops, yes more could have been done to help, but millions just up sticks and came to Briton and many other places over the world. Of course there was no hunger or starvation in Britain in those days was there
The truth is easily twisted, and some (a lot?) writers (authors) do it for personal (financial) gain.
December 24th, 2011  
VDKMS
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Der Alte
One in four WW2 casualties was caused by “combat fatigue” For those in lengthy, intense fighting; the ratio was one in two. No more stressful situation exists than combat. Before you are strangers you must kill. Beside you are friends being killed, friends you could join instantly. You are usually exhausted, filthy, and hungry. And those back home will never really understand what you have endured, because of battle’s unique, indescribable horror.

The Germans had recognized by the end of the First World War that combat fatigue was not simply cowardice or a lack of "moral fiber." However, most of the lessons of the First World War were forgotten by the time of the Second World War, and it took some time to relearn them. However, as the war wore on the German brass no longer thought combat fatigue was evidence of cowardice or a pre-war neurosis. It was a wound, albeit an emotional wound and psychiatrists relearned the lesson that combat fatigue was best treated as close to the front line as possible: The further back the patient was transferred for treatment, the less likely he was to fully recover. In many cases, the breakdown was transient, and the victim was able to pull himself through, sometimes with the help of his comrades, without leaving his unit. Such men were described as ”burned out” and even the best soldier will eventually succumb to some form of mental breakdown if he remains in continuous heavy combat long enough.

I do not know where you have the information from, that the Germans just shot them. I do not deny that it did not happen, but not to the extent you suggest. Try to use your common sense when evaluating information. How much efekt on morale would not have if it was the norm.
Here's my thought on that.

No matter how hard you try to put yourself in the shoes of those who were in combat, if you've never experienced it you do not even come close.

Someone who fought in the pacific died of alzheimer. He couldn't remember anything exept the horrors of combat, they never vanished. Even alzheimer couldn't wipe them away. That shows how deep those scarves are.

I'm very lucky not to have seen combat.
December 24th, 2011  
VDKMS
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Der Alte
A victim, perhaps. But also a willing victim.

I have often wondered if I would have gassed and burned Jews if I had ended up in such a place. The more I reflect, the more sure I am on the answer. The shocking truth is yes.
That applies to all of us. It is very easy to condemn someone. I allway think of this situation: You must kill an innocent civilian, if you refuse you'll get executed. What will you do?

I don't blame you as much as you do yourself. I respect you very much for your honesty.
December 24th, 2011  
George
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by VDKMS
That applies to all of us. It is very easy to condemn someone. I allway think of this situation: You must kill an innocent civilian, if you refuse you'll get executed. What will you do?

I don't blame you as much as you do yourself. I respect you very much for your honesty.
Not just a matter of "Just following Orders" when not following an illegal Order will get you shot now vs a possible death sentence @ some point in the distant future from a victorious enemy.
December 24th, 2011  
LeEnfield
 
 
Following Orders,..... You can be shot if don't, and shot if do. ain't life fun
December 25th, 2011  
84RFK
 
 
I knew it just had to be controversial, but I still believe that we are unable to compare our present surroundings, and the world we live in, to the lessons we should have learned by history.

I simply can't see any other reason why we (humans) continue making the same mistakes over and over...
December 25th, 2011  
Yossarian
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by 84RFK
I knew it just had to be controversial, but I still believe that we are unable to compare our present surroundings, and the world we live in, to the lessons we should have learned by history.

I simply can't see any other reason why we (humans) continue making the same mistakes over and over...

Becuase people in power often think highly of themselves and that they can achieve a different outcome...

There is a word for this phenomon but I feel I do not have to say it.
 


Similar Topics
WW2 Trivia
Air Force Cadence
Pentagon confirms using white phosphorous in Iraq
US 'uses incendiary arms' in Iraq