Most successful military commander. - Page 5




 
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October 4th, 2008  
AussieNick
 
Quote:
I am not so sure that the emphasis is on the size of the force but more on the magnitude to the battle and its consequences for example it is hard to compare an action in Vietnam to a battle such as Trafalgar or Waterloo.
All battles are of equal consequence to the soldier on the ground.
October 12th, 2008  
Wallabies
 
Quote:
I personally think that a successful leader is one who commands his men with courage, inspires them to follow him through personality not by virtue of rank and who fought in difficult circumstances. Victorious or not.
The commander can stay in his CP. I'd rather have someone knowing what the **** is going on and co-ordinating everything than some whacko up front waving his sword.
October 13th, 2008  
AussieNick
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wallabies
The commander can stay in his CP. I'd rather have someone knowing what the **** is going on and co-ordinating everything than some whacko up front waving his sword.
Depends on what level you are looking at doesn't it. I think that company level and below can have a commander who gets into the thick of it.... but anything bigger than that and it would start to get haywire. It would scare the hell out of me if my CO didn't stay in the CP or his office
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October 15th, 2008  
Del Boy
 
Leading from the front - I like the true story of the US general during the civil war, who stood above the the trench to observe and when warned to get down made the statement ' Don't be ridiculous - they couldn't hit an elephant at this range!' The very last words he ever uttered.

I cannot recall his name at the moment, but he was an often wounded officer, loved by his men.
October 15th, 2008  
aprilangel
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Del Boy
Leading from the front - I like the true story of the US general during the civil war, who stood above the the trench to observe and when warned to get down made the statement ' Don't be ridiculous - they couldn't hit an elephant at this range!' The very last words he ever uttered.

I cannot recall his name at the moment, but he was an often wounded officer, loved by his men.
It's a good story about a great man! I believe he was Major General John Sedgwick, known as "Uncle John" by his men.

...I like the quote about him in Clint Johnson's book 'Civil War Blunders: Amusing Incidents of the War' (John F. Blair, Publisher, 1997):

Sedgwick was "...both a magnet and a sponge for when it came to attracting confederate bullets...".


October 16th, 2008  
perseus
 
 
I heard it was more like

“They couldn’t hit an elephant at this dist....."

more gems include

Put out the bloody cigarette!!
Said by: Saki, to a fellow officer while in a trench during World War One, for fear the smoke would give away their positions. He was then shot by a German sniper who had heard the remark.

Pardon me, sir. I did not do it on purpose.
Said by: Queen Marie Antoinette after she accidentally stepped on the foot of her executioner as she went to the guillotine.

Please don’t let me fall.
Said by: Mary Surratt, before being hanged for her part in the conspiracy to assassinate President Lincoln. She was the first woman executed by the United States federal government.

No, you certainly can’t.
Said by: John F. Kennedy in reply to Nellie Connally, wife of Governor John Connelly, commenting “You certainly can’t say that the people of Dallas haven’t given you a nice welcome, Mr. President.

Hey, fellas! How about this for a headline for tomorrow’s paper? ‘French Fries’!
Said by: James French, a convicted murderer, was sentenced to the electric chair. He shouted these words to members of the press who were to witness his execution.
October 20th, 2008  
aprilangel
 
 

Topic: "The Grandmother of Europe": a 'common dear' or a 'commondeer'...


Here's just a simple offering of another viewpoint I found interesting, and have so shared for whomever might wish to consider also.

(When in terms of contemplating who was the most successful of military commanders, and the selection criteria for such an establishment. It is hoped that at least some points listed may assist/contribute something of interest toward the thread's topic objective.)

Queen Victoria (1819-1901), may prove to have not been the most successful of all military commanders as such, but to me, her positon in such matters is interesting enough and so may seem at least worthy of a mention here.

I hope you enjoy, cheers!

Her Commanding Authority - Overview of some points I found interesting:

Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, Empress of India (1876), and head of the vast colonial British Empire.
  • Queen Victoria ruled during the height of the Industrial Revolution.
  • Queen Victoria’s empire spanned over six continents, covering and controlling 14.2 million square miles.
  • Queen Victoria's British Empire was the largest colonial empire in the 19th century and the largest in history.
  • Queen Victoria ruled over 400 million people during her 63 year reign: which began when she was just 18 years of age.
Her Military Authority - Overview of some points I found interesting:
  • Queen Victoria called herself a Soldiers daughter. Victoria's style as monarch included "Victoria, by the Grace of God, of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland Queen, Defender of the Faith"; Her Royal Highness Princess Victoria of Kent (1819-1837); Her Majesty The Queen (1837-1901); and occasionally Her Imperial Majesty The Queen-Empress (1877-1901).
  • Queen Victoria fought more wars in her time then any Queen in English History.
  • Under Queen Victoria, the British Government was involved in countless wars.
  • There was not one year in Queen Victoria's reign in which somewhere in the world her soldiers were not fighting for her.
  • Queen Victoria's Army (after the Crimean War) is considered as "the beginning of what we recognize as the "Modern Army".
  • Aside from authorising Military Appointments/Ranks, Queen Victoria imposed that soldiers had to be competant in reading and writing in order to get promoted, and that officers instead of buying a rank, were expected to earn their rank.
Her Successful Authoritisations - Overview of some points I found interesting:


Notable mentions:
A. Queen Victoria - Timeline of Events.

http://www.pbs.org/empires/victoria/empire/time.html

B. Queen Victoria (Engines of Change) Part 1 of 6 - Overview.
http://au.youtube.com/watch?v=jJhzjhOj788
C. Queen Victoria (The Scramble for Africa) 1-6 Parts - Freedom.

http://au.youtube.com/watch?v=-TKmxFO58bM
Notable points:

Slavery:
  • Queen Victoria supported the act of Parliament in 1838 which abolished slavery throughout all colonies in the British Empire.
Voting Rights for Men:
  • Queen Victoria supported the Third Reform Act of 1884, which granted the right to vote to all male householders and effectively extended the vote to most British men.
Cheers!


Disclaimer: In all respects please note the exact and only motivation for this posting is the simple sharing of perspectives on the said topic, no other contextual matter and in particular, of or in any sexiest or policital nature has been intended. Also the information following is as credible as was available to me, and as such, and if so necessary, can be additionally validated by the many sources of general knowledge on the subject that are readily publically available for general public knowledge and consumption.
October 20th, 2008  
perseus
 
 
Aprilangel

I found this Timewatch programme of Queen Victoria's early life quite interesting. She became Queen against the odds, with all prior heir's dying. As a teenager she had to battle for power against her manipulative Mother and ambitious adviser John Conroy. It was all more reminiscent of Tudor Machiavellian type plotting than the quiet decent family we all expect. Perhaps her trials and tribulations during this period gave her the strength for later rule.

http://www.open2.net/timewatch/2008/youngvictoria.html
October 20th, 2008  
Del Boy
 
From a military point of view, she had a very good partner- her beloved Prince Albert.
October 21st, 2008  
aprilangel
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by perseus
Aprilangel

I found this Timewatch programme of Queen Victoria's early life quite interesting. She became Queen against the odds, with all prior heir's dying. As a teenager she had to battle for power against her manipulative Mother and ambitious adviser John Conroy. It was all more reminiscent of Tudor Machiavellian type plotting than the quiet decent family we all expect. Perhaps her trials and tribulations during this period gave her the strength for later rule.

http://www.open2.net/timewatch/2008/youngvictoria.html
Perseus,
I took the time to read the article you linked, in the light of your well reasoned points, and I was actually delighted by the insights I gained from it, so thank you, that's so very much appreciated.

The understanding I gained was that all the while during such character building hardships, this girl's father's devoted actions, resolve and love toward her and her ascension, would have deeply effected and shaped her in many ways too.

To that end, then it's no wonder this woman of many a noble title, did prefer to instead call herself a Soldiers Daughter, as she must have felt it was a far greater title to have then any other. And so with that concept of her self identity, it would seem to me she had learnt a fine logic, approach and admiration toward those who fought for her.

Cheers!
 


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