Military history instructor course - Page 5




 
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May 17th, 2015  
brinktk
 
 
Just to point out, Clauswitz is heavily studied in the "new" world (at least in the military) along with Jomini. I don't think the old world has a monopoly on their teachings.
May 17th, 2015  
brinktk
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by I3BrigPvSk
Brinktk: when you are at the Army War College, I have been thinking about what the American historian (military history) study most when it comes to the Second World War. Is it 50/50 between the European theater and the Pacific? I get a feeling most military historians are studying Europe, maybe much lesser about the campaign in Italy. Other parts of the war are also getting much lesser attention, the Japanese war in China, even when they were threatening India. Maybe historians in these countries studying these events.

Monty, would you say NZ historians are focusing their attention more on Italy than other historians. There was an NZ division active in Italy so I assume the NZ historians pay some attention to it
I think it is mostly focused on what the individual wants to study if it is historians we are talking about. I started out with Western Europe, moved to the Med, and now I would say my strongest area is the Pacific as far as American military history is concerned. I have studied at least as much on the Eastern front and have a healthy knowledge of the war in China as well.

That is just me though, I flop all around and try to learn about all areas of the conflict.
May 17th, 2015  
tetvet
 
The war with Japan was accentually over after the Battle of Midway , Japan could not recover not even close meanwhile the U.S kept building and building they were putting out Liberty Ships every 10 days , the need for Island Campaigns were point less all the U.S. had to do was blockade the Japanese lifelines ,
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May 17th, 2015  
JOC
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by tetvet
The war with Japan was accentually over after the Battle of Midway , Japan could not recover not even close meanwhile the U.S kept building and building they were putting out Liberty Ships every 10 days , the need for Island Campaigns were point less all the U.S. had to do was blockade the Japanese lifelines ,
Following the seesaw fighting in the Coral Sea, Midway could certainly be viewed as a naval turning point in the Japanese conflict. It resulted in the sinking of 4 Japanese carriers vs. 1 American carrier. A heavy a blow which Japan could ill afford. The battle marked the end of Japans supremacy in the Pacific Ocean. It was also the 1st major American victory necessary for moral after Pearl Harbor.
May 17th, 2015  
tetvet
 
To me one the most interesting wars of WWII was the winter war between Finland and Russia , Russia took a terrible beating , but the Finns granted the Russians much territory concessions .
May 17th, 2015  
BritinAfrica
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by tetvet
To me one the most interesting wars of WWII was the winter war between Finland and Russia , Russia took a terrible beating , but the Finns granted the Russians much territory concessions .
I agree with that totally. Apparently Britain wanted to aid the Finn against the Soviets, but because the Finns sided with Germany it would have been awkward to say the least.
May 17th, 2015  
I3BrigPvSk
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by brinktk
I think it is mostly focused on what the individual wants to study if it is historians we are talking about. I started out with Western Europe, moved to the Med, and now I would say my strongest area is the Pacific as far as American military history is concerned. I have studied at least as much on the Eastern front and have a healthy knowledge of the war in China as well.

That is just me though, I flop all around and try to learn about all areas of the conflict.
That is really good to widen your knowledge like that. You need to narrow it down when it comes to the Master thesis. Focus on that one first, one step at the time, Captain, one step at the time. It might be good idea to use your MA thesis as a foundation for your dissertation, it will save you a lot of reading.

Do you have time frame for your journey to be a teacher/scientist in military history?
May 17th, 2015  
I3BrigPvSk
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by JOC
My main point 13 was to point out that academia without experience can be limited. Personal prejudiced can enter at any point be it physical science or the science of human activity. It's one of our basic faults.
Point in case. Take the case of the 2nd world wars eastern front. Which is still coming to light after having received decades of the same prejudicial coverage that you referee to. The communist USSR wanted to cover their reduce their losses on paper for reasons of embarrassment and incompetence. The Germans preferred to reduce Soviet deaths (particularly Soviet civilian deaths and murders which weren't so well documented like the Jewish holocaust victims) to smooth over their guilt.
As a result the figure quoted for decades as for total deaths as a result of the German invasion of 20 million is actually > 27 million and could very well exceed 30 million. Note: This doesn't include several million killed by Stalin near wars end and in the period directly following the war.
The subjectivity or the lack of thereof can of course be an issue for all kinds of science, regardless if it is natural, social, and/or humanities. If the scientist is emotionally attached to the subject, the risk for being biased increases a bit, so it might be better for Brinktk to avoid the wars he participated in, it might be asking for troubles if he does that. To go for a Master degree first and later the doctorate is complicated as it is, no need to make it more complicated than necessary
 


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