Marine Corp Officer Candidate School




 
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March 6th, 2005  
thegrinch073
 
 

Topic: Marine Corp Officer Candidate School


This fall I am going to be starting college at Norwich University and will be in the Marine Corp rotc program. I was wondering upon graduating from college, what should I expect in OCS. I'm sure I'll be told during college but I would like some details now. Also, if anybody could help me in giving me some pointers on gaining respect from the Marines I will be leading when I first go active (the sergants will have much more years and experience than me). I will take any advice.
March 6th, 2005  
Charge 7
 
 
I can't comment on Marine Corps OCS, as I graduated from Army OCS. However, as far as gaining respect from subordinates, always remember that it is the rank that demands respect. The individual _earns_ respect. Listen to your senior sergeants, take care of your Marines, accomplish your missions and you can't go wrong.
March 6th, 2005  
RnderSafe
 
 
Firstly, you need to learn to capitalise the "M" in Marines.

Secondly, the Marine Corps is interested in self starters not those that expect things to be handed to them. Do a search on this site, search the internet - then come back and ask any questions you may have. As it stands now, all of what you ask can be found very easily on this site, or through a quick google search.
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March 6th, 2005  
Charge 7
 
 
Good points RndrSafe. It would've helped if he hadn't spelled "Marine" wrong in the topic either. Maybe you can help him out there?

Here's something I found that he may find helpful:

This is a condensed version of an article that originally appeared in the Field Artillery Journal, May-June 1984, based on Major General James E. Drummond's remarks at an FA Officer's Basic Course (FAOBC) graduation. At the time, General Drummond was the Commander of the Training and Doctrine Command (TRADOC) Combined Arms Test Activity (now known as Operational Test Command), Fort Hood, Texas. During his career, he also commanded III Corps Artillery, Fort Sill, Oklahoma. He presented his four rules for lieutenants during his FAOBC speech.

Make no bones about it: this graduation is truly a meaningful milestone, and it marks a point in time when your responsibilities change and from which you view professional responsibility differently. It's a time when the real excitement begins as you move out to join your fires units.

Equally, it's a time henceforth from which the Army looks at you differently and expects bigger and better things from you.... Your influence and your ability to help lead the Army and get things done are measurably improved as you carry away from this formation your diploma of course completion.

....I would like to give you Drummond's Four Rules for Basic Course Graduates. Perhaps you can file these rules away in your data bank and maybe one day use one or two of them.

1. My first rule for you graduates is "You can't expect to hit the jackpot unless you put a few nickels in the machine." This rule means you will get out of life in the Army only in direct proportion to what you put into it. To get any return at all, you've got to risk a few nickels of yourself. You must have an unselfish willingness to work hard at being a soldier.

A great part of investing of yourself is in learning the business. I believe whole-heartedly that "Professional competence is the mother of leadership." Soldiers respond to and follow only those leaders who know their jobs and are competent. Your soldiers don't expect that you know everything, but they'll demand that you care enough to try to learn.

You must continue to learn, to further your tactical and technical proficiency and be willing to "put a few nickels of yourself in the slot." The monetary rewards are not much, but that overwhelming feeling of personal satisfaction that comes from commitment to soldiers and a job well done is a bountiful jackpot in itself. So put a few nickels in the machine!

2. Drummond's second rule is also simple: "Sacred cows make the best hamburger." When you join that new unit, don't be afraid to question why they do something a certain way and to challenge their validity. One of the people you will be continually meeting in the Army is the "Old Sarge," and he may be a major, colonel or even a general. Old Sarge is the keeper of the sacred cows. He will tell you, "Look lieutenant, we've always done it that way," or "That's the way they want it done," never knowing who they are. Well, simply because we've always done something a certain way doesn't make it right nor the best way.

One of the best things about the Army education system is that each year Basic Course graduates reenergize the Army. You come into units with a high-energy level [and] the very latest and most up-to-date doctrine, procedures and techniques. You bring fresh new ideas, new approaches, and you can spot better ways of doing things. You are uncontaminated by "We've always done it that way." Challenge our sacred cows, our preconceptions, etc.

3. But a caution is Drummond's third rule: "There's something wrong if you are always right." So, despite the fact that you think you are the answer to the Army's prayers, keep an open mind and see the others' viewpoints. Make sure you know what you are talking about before you move into shifting units around.

When I spoke a few moments ago about Old Sarge, I spoke of him with reverence, respect and the deepest affection. I don't need to remind you that the great bastion of strength of the US Army is the NCO corps. They want to be sure you know what you are doing, and they want you to set high standards.

They want you to be successful and what better way than to give you the benefit of their experience. Listen to them. Seek out their counsel and advice. Think about what they tell you. When you are right, they'll back you all the way. If, by chance, you're wrong, they'll set you straight. They'll still back you because the NCO corps knows that loyalty, as integrity, is nonnegotiable. Sergeants conduct the business of the Army, and if business is good, it's because you have given them the authority and responsibility to do their jobs, and you've taken full advantage of their expertise, competence and hard-earned experience.

4. Drummond's fourth rule is "If you push on something long enough, it will fall over." It's all too easy for a young officer joining his first unit to become discouraged. The responsibilities at times appear overwhelming. You'll sign for 10 million dollars' worth of equipment and take on responsibility for the lives of 50 to 100 men. Pretty big burden for a 22-year old, wouldn't you say?

I guarantee you that if you'll try and if you'll give your best shot at things, you will eventually accomplish what you set out to do. Persistence often can achieve the seemingly impossible. Do what you know is right. Stand up for principles, and have the courage of your convictions. If you are convinced of the correctness and integrity of your position, push on and things will fall into place.
March 6th, 2005  
thegrinch073
 
 
I appoligize for all the spelling and grammar mistakes I have made. I have searched on the internet and was just looking for more added input.