JUST WHAT IS PTSD




 
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Boots
 
October 2nd, 2014  
tetvet
 

Topic: JUST WHAT IS PTSD


We hear a lot about PTSD , According to the experts it is the effects of a traumatic experience suffered by someone , it is not memories of that experience , its reliving the experience that puts the P in PTSD , in the Army when m I was in for every man in the bush there were 5 in support , so when I was in Vietnam there were 550000 men of these about a 100000 were actually in the bush the rest in supporting units , Navy , Air Force whatever . This is NOT a put down people served where needed .
October 2nd, 2014  
brinktk
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by tetvet
We hear a lot about PTSD , According to the experts it is the effects of a traumatic experience suffered by someone , it is not memories of that experience , its reliving the experience that puts the P in PTSD , in the Army when m I was in for every man in the bush there were 5 in support , so when I was in Vietnam there were 550000 men of these about a 100000 were actually in the bush the rest in supporting units , Navy , Air Force whatever . This is NOT a put down people served where needed .
And?....what's your point?
October 2nd, 2014  
Sevens
 
 
O...kay? O.o
--
Boots
October 2nd, 2014  
dadsgirl
 
 
I don't know of anyone who would put down someone who served their country..... then had PTSD!

Let me update this...I only know of FOOLS who would take a poke at ANYONE that has PTSD! Whether it be a veteran or an average person that has been through traumatic experiences!! That's not a laughing matter at all.

Dadsgirl
October 7th, 2014  
I3BrigPvSk
 
 
Like what Dadsgirl said; PTSD is a reaction to a traumatic experience. It doesn't need to be a military experience. It is also related to the survivors guilt. The treatment of PTSD originates from the treatment of abused and raped women and children. The reaction to a traumatic experience can be delayed for years or even decades. The goal with the treatment is not to get rid of the memories of the event, because that is impossible. The goal is to teach the victims to live with the reaction and not letting it taking over their lives.
October 7th, 2014  
tetvet
 
I don't know what your post is supposed to imply , I don't see where I put anyone down about PTSD , as I understand it there were something like 80,000 troops in Afghan at its peak doing the numbers that means that 12-15 thousand were actually in combat roles and made them candidates for possible PTSD .
October 7th, 2014  
JOC
 
 
Your missing the point. Anyone who has had a traumatic event(s) can be subject to the PTSD illness. It doesn't matter whether they have been in combat or not. Being on the flight deck of a carrier and seeing the lines cut a guy in 1/2 could cause it, just to make a example.
It like with many mental concerns requires the individual to try and mange these thoughts which are so traumatic and troublesome to the patient. The goal is to take the danger out of the thought. Often this is done with a combination of consoling which helps to teach the individual to take ownership of his thought process and medication.
I've worked with the VOC (Veterans Outreach Center)
October 7th, 2014  
I3BrigPvSk
 
 
The scientific interest in this matter occurred in the post Crimean war and in the post American Civil War. Florence Nightingale was involved in the establishment of treatment, the agreement in what to call it disorder was never agreed upon. However, it is the same regardless what we call it. The trauma is equally common among civilians facing traumas. It doesn't matter if it is a car crash, a natural disaster, and/or a man-made disaster.

My experience of PTSD is based on the survivors of natural disasters and they are facing the same problems as military personnel, perhaps even more than the military when they don't have the training and screening prior peoples entering the military.

After the Boxing Day disaster a little girl asked me for help to find her parents.....this little girl (about 6-7 years old) lost everything. Many others lost their family and friends that day, many of them suffer from PTSD
October 7th, 2014  
brinktk
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by tetvet
I don't know what your post is supposed to imply , I don't see where I put anyone down about PTSD , as I understand it there were something like 80,000 troops in Afghan at its peak doing the numbers that means that 12-15 thousand were actually in combat roles and made them candidates for possible PTSD .
Afghanistan isn't Vietnam where the majority of fighting is in the bush, paddies, dunes, swamp etc away from the cities. Both in Iraq and Afghanistan the fight is everywhere. No forward operating base or combat outpost was immune from indirect fire. In order to get from one place to another, most the time you have to drive....which is an extremely dangerous thing to do in either place. "Pogs" have to man the towers, entry control points, traffic control points, etc. on occasion which are all vulnerable to snipers and especially....terrifyingly....car bombs. Your assumption about the combat guys seeing "most" the action is probably true. But nobody is immune from attack. Not to mention the many times we have to mobilize to help clean up the mess from atrocities committed by our enemies on the civilian population. I've handled my share of human remains....it isn't something I ever became comfortable with.

This is a different war.
October 7th, 2014  
tetvet
 
By bush I meant in a combat situation , its quite true I know little about Afghan but I'd like too know , but I'm under attack every time I mention anything , anything !!!! at all .
 


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