Indian Army pictures 19th Century - Page 3




 
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March 8th, 2005  
serbianpower
 
that picture of gurkha charge is great. you can see his enemy laying under the guy with knife. I would not like to be in his position. do gurkhas have some characteristic custom, after they capture enemy post, with dead or alive enemy?
March 8th, 2005  
SwordFish_13
 
 
Hi,

Quote:
Correct me if I'm wrong, but a Swastika is a good luck symbol in India isn't it? That must have been weird to see it styand for so much evil.
Swastica the Pagan-Celtic symbol for life .........and Hindu symbol of Good Luck ...... Hitler knew perfectly well what he was doing when taking the Symbol of Life and Good Luck and turning it Around.


Peace
-=SF_13=-
March 8th, 2005  
Charge 7
 
 
I'm interested to see the WWII pics. I saw a program recently that interviewed many of the WWII fighters from India. Apparantly they get no veterans benefits or even any respect in their native land. The only ones that do are those who sided with Chandra Bose. They had several VC awarded soldiers on telling their sad story of neglect and humiliation.
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March 8th, 2005  
Zucchini
 
I've read that he took it from an archway carving on a Benedictine monastery where he attended school as a boy.

The photographs are very interesting.
March 8th, 2005  
Kilgore
 
Awesome photos! It is very hard to find photos of troops in the british commonwealth. I only manage to find Australian and new Zealand ones usually.
March 9th, 2005  
MadeInChina
 
old but cool fotos
March 9th, 2005  
godofthunder9010
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by lemontree
Quote:
Originally Posted by chewie_nz
Gurkha + BREN gun = bad times
A Gurkha + Khukhri are a deadlier combination. Gurkha battalions don't bayonet charge, they have a khukhri charge.
I don't own one, but I will. If I ever get into a knife fight, the Khukhri is my first choice of weapons. BWAHAHAHAHAHAHA!!
March 9th, 2005  
lemontree
 
Quote:
I would not like to be in his position. do gurkhas have some characteristic custom, after they capture enemy post, with dead or alive enemy?
There is no "characteristic custom" once an enemy post is captured. The use of the khukhri ends after the enemy surrenders. But Gurkhas have a custom, that whenever a khukhri is drawn out of the scabbard, then it cannot be put back without drawing blood, so after troops clean their khukhris they cut their fingers to draw blood before putting it back in the scabbard.
Quote:
I saw a program recently that interviewed many of the WWII fighters from India. Apparantly they get no veterans benefits or even any respect in their native land. The only ones that do are those who sided with Chandra Bose. They had several VC awarded soldiers on telling their sad story of neglect and humiliation.
Charge_7,
That is an unfortunate truth. All the soldiers that were de-mobilised after WW2 and before independence in 1947 were not authorised pension, since the politicians in their warped minds considered them (army) a tool of oppression of the Empire. However, those men are given great treatment and honour by their unit and regiments and people even if the monetary benifit is absent. Wheather the politicians like it or not the Republic Day consist of surviving VC award winners who lead the parade along with the Indian (highest) gallantry award winners. The troops that sided with Subhas Chandra Bose were considered 'freedom fighters' and hence they were granted special pension and previlages. WW2 vets that retired after independence were given all the benifits due to them.

Some more pics....
A truly spectacular image. In the heat of the moment - Indian soldiers storm a German trench, after exploding it with hand grenades. Circa 1945.

Until 8 March 1945, the pagodas crowning Mandalay Hill outside that city came into sight. There was stiff fighting ahead for the men of the 1/6th Gurkha Rifles.

The 4/6th Gurkha Rifles cross the Irrawaddy River on 27 January 1945. The Gurkhas spent the next few weeks involved in hard fought actions with the Japanese.

An Italian soldier surrenders to a Jawan, during Operation Crusader, of an unnamed Division and Regiment, on 08 December 1941. The purpose of Operation Crusader was two-fold; to relieve Tobruk and destroy the Afrika Korp. First part of the conflict was a success, the second a failure. The battle took place between the Egyptian border and El Agheila in Libya.

Indian troops, during Operation Battleaxe on 06 August 1941. An Indian infantry division was involved in the first attempt to remove Reverend Major Bachs' forces out of Halfaya Pass - an important position between the Egypt and Libyan border. The latter was then an Italian colony. Bachs was a German priest and therefore had a religious title, as well a military rank.

The Afrika Korp had retreated towards oncoming reinforcements and their counter attack was swift and vicious. Muddles within Allied High Command left the 4th Indian Division's (Fighting Fourth) 7th Brigade widely exposed and despite a daring move by the Brigade's commander, Brigadier H.R. Briggs which saved most of the unit, a 1000 men were taken POW. They are shown here being marched through Benghazi in January 1942.

A Garwhali trooper, in action, in Burma. Circa 1945.

An Indian soldier holds a captured Nazi flag. Circa 1945.

The 2/6th Gurkha Rifles advance towards Medicinia, April 1945.

Medium artillery guns get unusual attention from their detachments.

Sikh VCOs (Viceroy's Commissioned Officers) report to their Battalion HQ.

Men of the 6th Gurkha Rifles use 3" mortar in action in Burma. Circa 1944.

Indian paratroopers being dropped at Elephant Point, Burma on 1 May 1945.

Caravan of General Von Arnim, German Army, who surrendered to the 4th Indian Division (a.k.a. Fighting Fourth) in Tunisia, Africa.

A Lieutenant Colonel from the 20th Indian Division, accepts the formal surrender of a Japanese Commander at Saigon, Vietnam in September 1945.

A group from the 152nd Para Battalion displaying the Japanese flag they captured while operating against the Japanese Army at Tangkhul Hundung. Circa 1945.

Troops of the 5th Indian Division advancing against Indonesian Pemudas during the Battle of Surabaya, Java in November 1945. Lasting for 19 days, this battle was the last time Indian troops were commanded in combat by British Officers.
March 9th, 2005  
Charge 7
 
 
Thanks for the further info about the WWII vets. Good to hear their units haven't forgotten them.
March 9th, 2005  
SwordFish_13
 
 
Hi,

Quote:
I've read that he took it from an archway carving on a Benedictine monastery where he attended school as a boy.
Emmmm Actually many people have Speculated on this Thing for quite a long now ......... ......... But it'sd much more complex than seeing it on a wall ........ i wouodnt go much deeper into the Subject as it is a very wide Discussion in itself ......... i will give you a hint ......One of teh suggested reasons is :

Hitler had a Dream of Creating a Superior Human race ....... a race that would Eventually Wipe out all other lesser Human beings for that he was breeding those babies of the reace in those Child camps ........ he wanted to Create the Superior Aryan race that would rule over the rest .

Tsk Tsk Tsk We are Aryans


Peace
-=SF_13=-