Indian Army pictures 19th Century - Page 2




 
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March 4th, 2005  
lemontree
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zucchini
There are clearly two different types of rifles in the photographs.

But that wasn't my point.

The rifle they are equipped with is superior to the one used by the USA at that time, and the USA used the inferior rifles right into the Spanish American War.
My mistake. The picture you posted was of the Martini-Henry, which was the rifle issued after the Snider-Enfield has served its purpose as an interim measure.
The little that I know of bolt action rifles, the European rifles were infact superior to the American made ones. The Krag rifle used during the Spanish-American war was however inferior to the Spanish Mauser 93 model. Maybe that is why the Springfield rifle adopted in 1903 was based on the Mauser 98 design.
March 4th, 2005  
lemontree
 
Some more of WW1...
A Grenadier from 114th Marathas at Kut-al-Amara, Mesopotamia, 1916.

A recon patrol of the Hodsons Horse near Vraignes, France. April 1917.

A Gurkha soldier using a trench periscope in Palestine, 1917.

Men from the 2/6th Gurkha Rifles march north towards the battle of Khan Baghdadi on 22 March 1918.

Early signs of the effect of an air attack - a Lewis machine gun placed on an anti-aircraft mounting, manned by members of the Jat Regiment, in Mesopotamia (present-day Iraq). Circa World War I. (Soldiers in the rear seem to be diving for cover).
March 4th, 2005  
A Can of Man
 
 
Great pictures!
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March 4th, 2005  
Zucchini
 
Teddy's boys may have had Krag carbines in SAW, but most USA soldiers still had trapdoors, which were in use for something like 4 decades.

In the 1930s Mac reported to congress that the US military was ranked 17th in the world as a fighting unit.
March 6th, 2005  
lemontree
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zucchini
but most USA soldiers still had trapdoors, which were in use for something like 4 decades.
What is the 'trapdoor' rifle?
The US army was not a colonial army like the British and French, hence, they were not rated as the top 5 or 10 armies of those days. The colonial armies had the advantage of learning from the various colonial expansion wars that were fought. However, WW2 changed all that.
March 6th, 2005  
Zucchini
 
This is a "trapdoor" rifle:

March 7th, 2005  
lemontree
 
Now for WW2...
Out of 31 Victoria Crosses awarded in the Burma front, 28 VCs were awarded to Indians.
A portrait of Tulbahadur Pun, Victoria Cross (VC).
Pun was awarded a VC at Mogaung on the night of 6/7th June 1944. After his comrades were killed around him, he single handedly charged a group of Japanese who were dug in 30 yards away across open ground, firing a bren gun from the hip he overcame the enemy and captured their position and two light machine guns.


Men of the 2/6th Gurkha Rifles who served with equal distinction in Italy. The second photograph shows a Gurkha soldier proudly displaying his feared Khukri - a Nepalese dagger. A Gurkha and his khukri are an extremely dangerous combination for the enemy. Circa World War II.


5/5 Marathas in Italy, late 1944 or early 1945. Machine gunners with Vickers MMG's setting up pre-established fields of fire for a defensive position. The bulbous devices on the muzzles of the Vickers are recoil accelerators designed to minimize jamming during sustained fire.

Madras Sappers and Miners work on a 'corduroy' road east of Kohima, on the Jessami track, August 1944. Timber provided a cheap way of producing a reasonably durable road surface for those hard-to-reach areas where mule or air transport was not enough.


Engineers of the 8th Indian Division rest on the morning of 12 May 1944. They spent the previous night clearing enemy mines planted on the Gustav Line, allowing infantry and armour to break through during the drive that would take the Allies north to Rome.

Jawans (soldiers) of the 4th Indian Division, right after Operation Crusader. These Jawans were virtually the only fresh troops available to the Allies, in the advance towards the capture of the Libyan port of Derna in December 1941.

A Sikh-manned Bren gun team of the Fourth Indian division participating in manoeuvres prior to Operation Compass, the December 1940 offensive against the Italian Army in the desert of Western Egypt and Eastern Libya.

4.2" mortar crews of 5/5 Marathas, the machine gun battalion of the 8th Indian Division, in action in Italy. Machine gun battalions manned the Vickers machine guns and heavy mortars that supported infantry divisions.
March 7th, 2005  
chewie_nz
 
After his comrades were killed around him, he single handedly charged a group of Japanese who were dug in 30 yards away across open ground, firing a bren gun from the hip he overcame the enemy and captured their position and two light machine guns.

Gurkha + BREN gun = bad times

gotta love the BREN though, 40 years before the the SAW....a light machinegun you could fire from the hip
March 8th, 2005  
lemontree
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by chewie_nz
Gurkha + BREN gun = bad times
A Gurkha + Khukhri are a deadlier combination. Gurkha battalions don't bayonet charge, they have a khukhri charge.

Here are some more pics....
Jawans(soldiers) from the 17th Indian Divison on assault at Imphal in June 1944. The Naik(corporal) in the foreground carries a Thompson SMG and the riflemen in the background carry a SMLE with a fixed bayonet.

Indian Paratroopers during World War II. Source: Parachute Regiment (India).

Dogra troops from 2 Gogra, in forward light machine-gun positions in Burma. Circa 1944.

Indian infantry assaults through a burning objective, in Burma. Possibly, Circa 1945.

Ayo Gurkhali!!! Gurkha troops charge the enemy lines in Burma. Possibly, Circa 1945.

Sikh mountain gunners cleaning Italian guns captured by the 5th Indian Division in Eritrea. Circa 1941.

Humbling of a symbol of unbridled power - Indian troops examine a captured German Swastika, at Sidi Omer.

Infantry of the 29th Indian Brigade assault Italian defensive positions at Jalo, a point to the west of Tobruk, on the 5/6th of December 1941.

March 8th, 2005  
r031Button
 
 
Correct me if I'm wrong, but a Swastika is a good luck symbol in India isn't it? That must have been weird to see it styand for so much evil.