HALT! Who goes there?




 
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HALT! Who goes there?
 
January 29th, 2012  
Trooper1854
 
 

Topic: HALT! Who goes there?


HALT! Who goes there?
During the Falklands war, a young squaddie of the Parachute Regiment was on guard duty one night when he heard the sound of someone approaching his post.
He gave the challenge; “Halt! Who goes there?” no response.
Again, “Halt!” Still no reply, just the sound of someone walking towards him.
He shouts, “HALT!” nothing, one last time “HALT!”
He opens fire with the GPMG.
At this his section Corporal comes running up.
“What the @$£! is going on!?”
“Someone in front of us, failed to halt, despite being challenged, so I opened up
By now the platoon officer and Sergeant were there and, with the Corporal they went forward and found a group of soldiers lying dead in front of the guard post. One was still alive and they realised he was a Welsh Guardsman.
“Didn’t you hear the challenge?!” asked the officer?
“Yes.” Whispered the wounded Guardsman.
“Then why didn’t you halt?” Asked the Sergeant.
“He kept giving the order on the wrong foot sir!”
January 29th, 2012  
AFSteliga
 
 
Good one.
January 30th, 2012  
BritinBritain
 
 
They aren't called wooden tops for nothing.
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HALT! Who goes there?
January 30th, 2012  
Trooper1854
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by BritinAfrica
They aren't called wooden tops for nothing.
It was a Welsh Guard Falklands Veteran who told me this one.
January 30th, 2012  
BritinBritain
 
 
I was told a story by an ex Falklands vet where the British troops called the Falkland Islanders "Bennies" after the simpleton in the old British TV series Crossroads. The Falkland Islanders complained and troops were ordered to stop calling the Falklanders names. The troops began to call them "Stills." An officer asked an other rank, what does "Stills" mean, he replied, "Still Bennies."
January 30th, 2012  
42RM
 
There's a story that's passed into Corps folklore that, perhaps, exemplifies the type of officer whom the men will respect, whatever his superiors may think of him. A Royal Marines officer had been sent on a particular course, which meant living in an Army Mess. Coming down to breakfast one day, he found the dining room deserted save for a Guards officer, sitting at the table and wearing his cap peak over his eyes in true Guards manner.

Grunting a greeting, the Royal Marine sat down, and looked around him for a moment before asking the Guardee to pass the sugar. Absolutely no response. Not even an indication that the Marine was in the room. Again, the Marine asked for the sugar. Again, no response. He asked for a third time and finally the Guardee condescended to speak:

"When a Guards officer wears his hat to breakfast, it is an indication that he does not wish to speak to, or be spoken to by, anyone. It is a tradition of the regiment.'

The Marrine thought about it for a few moments, then climbed on to the table, walked over to the Guardee and stood in his cereal.

"When a Royal Marines officer puts his boots in your cornflakes, it means pass the bloody sugar!"
January 30th, 2012  
Trooper1854
 
 
A Royal Navy officer told me this story:
He was on a course at a Navy base and the officers had a tray of tea and toast delivered each morning to their rooms by a Wren. (This was a while back)
On the last night of the course, they had a formal dining in night, and most of them got rather plastered.
One Royal Marine officer was so slaughtered, he had to be carried up to bed by two Navy officers.
They stripped off his Mess Dress, incase he puked and made a "mess" of it and left him in his bed in just his birthday suit.
Next morning when he woke up, there were five trays of tea and toast in his room!
 


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