Fincastle competition




 
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February 23rd, 2005  
chewie_nz
 

Topic: Fincastle competition


Thursday 17 February, 2005

A rare visit from a Royal Air Force (RAF) Nimrod - the British Maritime Patrol Aircraft is in New Zealand to take part in the world's longest running submarine hunting competition.

Hosted by the New Zealand Air Force at Whenuapai, the Fincastle competition sees the Nimrod crew pit their skills against crews from New Zealand and Australia.

The keenly contested competition involves participants' ability to detect, classify, track and engage a submarine by day or night.

In addition, the exercise involves a forum for the development of procedures and tactics, and wider maritime surveillance and patrol training

This morning the Nimrod and P3 Orion's from New Zealand and Australia completed familiarisation flights off the east coast of the North Island, in the lead up to competition flights.

A maintenance competition will also be run, with each nation judged on their flight line operations and engineering skills.

ENDS
Ground crew prepare an RAF Nimrod for an early morning flight out of Whenuapai. The Maritime Patrol Aircraft is making a rare visit to New Zealand as part of Exercise Fincastle
February 23rd, 2005  
A Can of Man
 
 
Sounds cool
I think the Australians want to keep their submarine tracking skills in top shape because of possible run ins with the Chinese navy in the South China sea and also into Southeast Asia. The whole Spratley thing going on.
February 23rd, 2005  
Charge 7
 
 
"Hosted by the New Zealand Air Force at Whenuapai"

I thought New Zealand had no air force? They keep just ground crews then? or has there been a reactivation?
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February 23rd, 2005  
chewie_nz
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Charge_7
"Hosted by the New Zealand Air Force at Whenuapai"

I thought New Zealand had no air force? They keep just ground crews then? or has there been a reactivation?
hmmmm misconception that i have noticed on this forum. although the air combat wing (flying A4K skyhawks) was scrapped a couple of years ago NZ still has an airforce.
i disagreed strongly to scrapping the air combat wing of No. 75 squadron as i had spent many years (since i was eight) striving to become an air force pilots flying A4's. but i can see the resoning behind the decision. they were an expensive white elephant only used for air shows. they were old (although the "kahu" upgrade brought their fire control and radar up to f-16 standard) and their replacements would cost a hell of a lot of money ( F16c's from a cancelled order meant for pakistan), more than NZ could realistally afford. esp as we were going to be buying a fleet of NZLAV vehicles and two new ANZAC frigates


we rely very heavily on a couple of elements;

the P3K orion for fisheries patrol and maritime survielance/SAR. NZ has a 200 kilometre exclusive economic zone (EEZ) with some of the best deep sea fishing in the world. the P3's patrol for up to 12 hours looking for illegal fishing. also used for dropping rafts to wrecked boaties during the many tropical cyclones that rip through the islands to the north of NZ
Radius of action of 1,850km (1,000NM) with 4 hours on station.
Endurance of 15 hrs with two engines shut down to conserve fuel.

The RNZAF currently operates six P-3K Orions.
It took delivery of five P-3B Orions in 1966 (NZ4201 - NZ4205). In 1985 an ex-RAAF P-3B was purchased (NZ4206)
All six Orions were upgraded (avionics and radio systems) under project RIGEL in the early 1980s. Following the upgrade the designation P-3K has been applied to these aircraft.

http://www.airforce.mil.nz/latestinf...ects/orion.htm

also we have our fleet of C-130 hercules transports. used to deploy NZ forces to many places (usually for peacekeeping) and to keep our antarctic research station resuplyed.
The RNZAF currently operates five C-130 Hercules. It took delivery of the first three Hercules (NZ7001 - NZ7003) in 1965
These were the first C-130H production models off the Lockheed production line.
A further two C-130H, (NZ7004 - NZ7005) were added in 1969.


http://www.airforce.mil.nz/latestinf...s/hercules.htm

and the UH-1H Iroquois. used extensivly for SAR, looking for drug plantation in conjunction with the police, and for air transporting the NZ army around. however, the air force is currently looking for a replacement as we are having fatigue issues with the airframes
The RNZAF currently operates 14 Iroquois helicopters.
Five UH-1D (NZ3801- NZ3805) were delivered in 1966.
A further nine UH-1H (NZ3806 - NZ3814) were delivered in 1970. A further UH-1H (NZ3815) was delivered in 1976. The UH-1Ds were progressively upgraded to UH-1H standard during the mid 1970s.
Two ex-US Army UH-1H attrition airframes were purchased in 1996. One has been brought into service as NZ3816

Fleet Losses: NZ3810 crashed 27 April 1972
NZ3813 crashed 31 March 1995


The choice of aircraft for the RNZAF is dependent on the roles and tasks they will have to perform. The RNZAF has an aircraft inventory of 28 operational and 21 training aircraft.

To meet the requirements of the Force Elements and the Training Elements , specialised aircraft are used. Currently the RNZAF operates the following aircraft types:

Lockheed
P-3K Orion

Lockheed
C-130H Hercules

Bell
UH-1H Iroquois

Boeing
727-22QC

Beech King Air
B200

Bell
B47G-B3-2 Sioux

Boeing
757-200

Pacific Aerospace Company Limited
CT-4E Airtrainer

hope thats some usfull info for you and has cleared up that nasty misconception! all of this info can be found at; http://www.airforce.mil.nz/home/main.htm
February 23rd, 2005  
A Can of Man
 
 
Well yeah it sounds reasonable enough. I mean just WHEN will New Zealand actually require combat aircraft??? You'd need an enemy with an aircraft carrier and a serious desire for sheep!
Plus New Zealand doesn't have a massive defense budget anyway. A bit unfortunate to lose your fighter wing but the decision was sound.
February 23rd, 2005  
Charge 7
 
 
Okay no attack aircraft then other than helicopters. Thanks for the clarification.
February 24th, 2005  
chewie_nz
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Charge_7
Okay no attack aircraft then other than helicopters. Thanks for the clarification.
well we have been known to hang harpoon ASM's off the Orions. they were used to sink a burning and drifting trawler off the coast of the south island.

but the hardpoints are there for a reason!
February 24th, 2005  
Charge 7
 
 
Yeah but I would hardly call an Orion an attack aircraft because it is capable of firing missiles. It's not going to turn and twist too well against opposition. Call it a recon/intel aircraft with attack capabilities.