Fiercest Battle in History - Page 26




 
--
 
July 29th, 2009  
MontyB
 
 
I still lean towards Verdun.

And to back it up...
The Battle of Verdun 1916 - the greatest battle ever
French attack on the German lines during the Battle of Verdun
The Battle of Verdun is considered the greatest and lengthiest in world history. Never before or since has there been such a lengthy battle, involving so many men, situated on such a tiny piece of land. The battle, which lasted from 21 February 1916 until 19 December 1916 caused over an estimated 700,000 casualties (dead, wounded and missing). The battlefield was not even a square ten kilometres. From a strategic point of view there can be no justification for these atrocious losses. The battle degenerated into a matter of prestige of two nations literally for the sake of fighting......
http://www.wereldoorlog1418.nl/battleverdun/index.htm
July 29th, 2009  
Solideo
 
Somme in WWI and Stalingrad in WWII

Best
July 29th, 2009  
Del Boy
 
D-Day, the Battle for Normandy. 'In the whole history of war', Stalin wrote to Churchill,'there has never been such an undertaking'. The very scale and its meticulous planning were unprecedented. The thick hedgerows of Normandy were ideal for the defender, and the Germans, especially the Waffen-SS divisions, fought with cunning and a desperate ferocity. British, Canadian and American forces became involved in battles whose savagery was often comparable to the Eastern Front.

The average losses per division on both sides in Normandy were to exceed those for Soviet and German divisions during an equivalent period on the Eastern Front.

German losses on the eastern front averaged just under 1000 men per division per month.

In Normandy they averaged 2300 per division per month.

The calculation for the Red Army is much more complicated, BUT it would appear to be well under 1500 per division per month.

Allied casualties in Normandy were close to an average of 2000 per division per month.
--
August 2nd, 2009  
Solideo
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Del Boy

The average losses per division on both sides in Normandy were to exceed those for Soviet and German divisions during an equivalent period on the Eastern Front.

German losses on the eastern front averaged just under 1000 men per division per month.

In Normandy they averaged 2300 per division per month.

The calculation for the Red Army is much more complicated, BUT it would appear to be well under 1500 per division per month.

Allied casualties in Normandy were close to an average of 2000 per division per month.
In Iwo Jima I think died 20.000 japs and 5000 marines in a month (I think I remember that, but not sure at all)
August 3rd, 2009  
Wallabies
 
Quote:
In Iwo Jima I think died 20.000 japs and 5000 marines in a month (I think I remember that, but not sure at all)
The Somme tripled that in 1 day.
August 3rd, 2009  
Solideo
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wallabies
The Somme tripled that in 1 day.
Yes I put Somme some days ago, was reminding of a WWII Battle
August 5th, 2009  
bigcanada813
 
 
I would have to agree with Monty. After the initial German successes at the end of February, the French Army would immediatly launch a local counter-attack to reclaim any lost territory, no matter the cost. Not only that, over have of the units in the French Army fought at Verdun at some point during the battle.
August 5th, 2009  
Tovarish1
 
 
Stalingrad. My Great Grandfather fought there (Artillery Captain for the Soviet Army) and it was really sadistic how the Germans blocked all entrances/exits into the city for no food to come it. People were dying by the thousands of hunger each day.
August 7th, 2009  
BritinAfrica
 
 
One of the most vicious battles in history has got to be the Battle of Isandlwana 22nd January 1879.


Over 1000 British troops were massacred by something in the region of 25,000 Zulu's. No quarter was given or asked, slain troops were disemboweled after being stabbed by the iklwa, a shorter version of the assegai.


The Zulu method of attack was:-

1. The main force, the "chest", closed with the enemy and pinned it in position.

2. The "horns", while the enemy was pinned by the "chest", would flank the enemy from both sides and encircle it; in conjunction with the "chest" they would then destroy the trapped force.

3. The "loins", a large reserve, was placed, seated, behind the "chest" with their backs to the battle. The "loins" would be committed wherever the enemy threaten to break out of the encirclement.

A Zulu chief after the battle stated regarding the British troops, “They fought like lions and fell where they stood.”


After the battle a lot more respect was shown by both sides for their foe.
August 11th, 2009  
BootStomp
 
 
Modern- Staligrade and I would also say Iwo Jima.

Ancient Times- Cannae

Over all- Cannae

Explanation- Friece to me means ocmbat and bloodshed so Cannae, body count and days def Stalingrade.