Favorite War Era Aircraft. - Page 4




 
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February 11th, 2012  
BritinBritain
 
 
The Soviets tried to build a copy of the Concord known in UK as the Concordski, for some reason she didn't work out too well.

I wonder why Gloster didn't build more of the single engine jet the Gloster E.28/39, also known as the "Gloster Whittle", "Gloster Pioneer", or "Gloster G.40" From all accounts pilots who flew her were impressed.

One serving RAF officer asked his buddy, "How does it work Bill?" Bill replied, "It sucks itself along like a hoover old boy."

When I landed at RAF Changi in Singapore in 1967, I looked out of the VC10 window and saw a C47 and C130's with US markings along with a couple of Meteors on the pan. It was like going back in time!
February 11th, 2012  
Trooper1854
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yossarian
As for jets of the second WW, gotta go with the Meteor, better engines, and a dashing sillouette.
You've got to give the Meteor its due.
First flew in 1943.
Retired from RAF service in 1980.
A good basic design with a lot lot of longevity in it.
The DC3 Dakota is another good example.
First flew in 1935, and still being used.
February 11th, 2012  
BritinBritain
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trooper1854
You've got to give the Meteor its due.
First flew in 1943.
Retired from RAF service in 1980.
A good basic design with a lot lot of longevity in it.
The DC3 Dakota is another good example.
First flew in 1935, and still being used.
The South African Air Force are still using Dakota's, but with turbo prop engines. Amazing aircraft. It's not too long ago that the SAAF got rid of their WW2 Havards or Texans as they are known in the US.
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February 11th, 2012  
Trooper1854
 
 
In the early 70s when there was the "crisis" in Belize with the neighboring Guatemalans, the carrier, Ark Royal was dispatched and her Buccaneers did a fly over as a deterence to any hostile action.
Guatemala's airforce was still equiped with Mustangs.
That would have proved interesting, but saying that, during Korea, a Sea Fury shot down a Mig 15.
That was mainly because the Mig slowed down to engage the Sea Fury and flew within the Fury's envelope.
The Argentinian Mirages did the same with the Sea Harriers.
They gave up their advantages in speed to engage a more maneuverable adversary.
It can be said the pilot is the key. A more experienced pilot in a lesser aircraft will win over a less experienced pilot in a better machine.
When the USA got hold of a Mig-15 during Korea, it was being tested by Chuck Yeager.
A General claimed it was a better airplane than the F-86 but Yeager said that it was the skill of the pilot that mattered more.
He took on the General flying in the Mig against him in the F-86, then vice versa, and "waxed his tail" both times.
February 12th, 2012  
Trooper1854
 
 
Here's another interesting machine.
The Me 163 "Komet"
Rocket powered, point defence interceptor.
Capable of incredible acceleration and time to altitude performance.
More were lost to accidents as a result of the volatile nature of the fuel than to enemy action.





February 12th, 2012  
BritinBritain
 
 
From what I have heard and read, the Komet 163 had a rather nasty habit of blowing up when being refuelled. The pilots who flew them had a lot more guts then I've got. They deserved the Iron Cross first class just for climbing in the bloody thing, so did the blokes who refuelled them.

When I was in Malta we got a message over the radio of a Buccaneer in trouble. All crash equipment was scrambled and waited and waited and waited. Finally we saw him coming in on finals trailing thick black smoke. I thought, "If he makes it, he'll be bloody lucky." Thankfully she touched down without incident, when she stopped the crash crews were all over her like a rash. I think the pilot went for a well deserved pint and smoked 20 king size. If he didn't smoke, I wouldn't mind betting he did after that.
February 12th, 2012  
Trooper1854
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by BritinAfrica
From what I have heard and read, the Komet 163 had a rather nasty habit of blowing up when being refuelled. The pilots who flew them had a lot more guts then I've got. They deserved the Iron Cross first class just for climbing in the bloody thing, so did the blokes who refuelled them.
.
The fuel used was basically Hydrazine, known as C Stoff, and Hydrogen Peroxide, T Stoff.
When mixed together they explode violently.
There is a story of a ground crew man putting Hydrazine into a bucket which some months ago had held Hydrogen Peroxide, and the explosion killed him!
Anyone handling the fuel, and the pilots, wore overals with no organic fibres in it as the fuels were extremely corrosive of organic tissue.
Pilots would be badly injured on landing, if the thing didn't explode and kill them, because the fuel tanks could rupture and spill the noxious fuel on them.
The RAE at Farnborough had an Me163 for testing after the war, but they only would allow it to be flown as a glider as the fuel was so extremely dangerous.
The book "Wings of the Luftwaffe" by Captain Eric Brown RN, covers this, and he flew it and saw it crash killing a friend of his.
The RAF had restored one at RAF St Athans, and I remeber seeing it there.
It is incredibly small. The motto of one of the squadrons that flew it was "Only a flea, but oh oh!"
February 12th, 2012  
BritinBritain
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trooper1854
The fuel used was basically Hydrazine, known as C Stoff, and Hydrogen Peroxide, T Stoff.
When mixed together they explode violently.
There is a story of a ground crew man putting Hydrazine into a bucket which some months ago had held Hydrogen Peroxide, and the explosion killed him!
Anyone handling the fuel, and the pilots, wore overals with no organic fibres in it as the fuels were extremely corrosive of organic tissue.
Pilots would be badly injured on landing, if the thing didn't explode and kill them, because the fuel tanks could rupture and spill the noxious fuel on them.
The RAE at Farnborough had an Me163 for testing after the war, but they only would allow it to be flown as a glider as the fuel was so extremely dangerous.
The book "Wings of the Luftwaffe" by Captain Eric Brown RN, covers this, and he flew it and saw it crash killing a friend of his.
The RAF had restored one at RAF St Athans, and I remeber seeing it there.
It is incredibly small. The motto of one of the squadrons that flew it was "Only a flea, but oh oh!"
I did my RAF trade training at St Athan in1966 (Number 4 School of Technical Training) but I don't recall seeing a Komet there. The only aircraft I remember seeing at St Athan was a Vickers Valiant when I was there as an air cadet in August 1964 on our annual camp and of course Chipmunks of the air experience flight.

Good job we had a NAAFI because pubs closed on Sunday in Wales (I can't remember if it was all day Sunday or just Sunday evenings).

Captain Eric Brown was an astonishing pilot he held the record for flying more aircraft types then anyone else in the world. He was also I/C Enemy Aircraft Flight and was the first pilot to land a jet on a carrier. He was also earmarked to fly the Mile's 52 to break the sound barrier, he said, "I was picked cos I'm a short arse." Sadly the government of the day scrapped the Miles 52.

Captain Brown also served on detachment to the US, he was heavily fined for making a pass of the airfield and breaking the glass in the CO's greenhouse.
February 12th, 2012  
Yossarian
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trooper1854
Here's another interesting machine.
The Me 163 "Komet"
Rocket powered, point defence interceptor.
Capable of incredible acceleration and time to altitude performance.
More were lost to accidents as a result of the volatile nature of the fuel than to enemy action.






A true predessor of the Mikoyan 25? In terms of Concept of course.

Always thought the Komet was a really interesting aircraft, especiall for it's time, who knows , if Hitler would have cleared it's production and deployment from day one, what allied bombers would have faced driving deeper and deeper into Germany on raids.
February 12th, 2012  
Trooper1854
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yossarian
A true predessor of the Mikoyan 25? In terms of Concept of course.

Always thought the Komet was a really interesting aircraft, especiall for it's time, who knows , if Hitler would have cleared it's production and deployment from day one, what allied bombers would have faced driving deeper and deeper into Germany on raids.
They were a "first pass" weapon.
Once their fuel, and energy were gone, they were a glider, and the Allied fighter pilots made short work of them.
Also a clumsy landing would leave a smudge on the runway!
 


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