Europe and asia - Page 2




 
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July 25th, 2004  
dsj
 
It's in A Glossary of the Construction, Decoration and Use of Arms and Armor in All Countries and in All Times Together With Some Closely Related Subjects by George Cameron Stone. The author is so fat and inept and he claims to be able to shoot further than the british traditional longbowmen. He is crazy.
July 25th, 2004  
Mark Conley
 
 
ummm did you look at the publishing date of the book? i dont think M-16s were around then....
July 25th, 2004  
dsj
 
I meant the M 16s today.
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July 25th, 2004  
yurry
 
Mybe a bit offtopic:

The Chiese had invented gunpowder, hell they even had fireworks

How come they didn't have guns and cannons. Who was the first country, who used these in combat?
July 25th, 2004  
dsj
 
The chinese were not a innovative race. Their culture was not interested in natural sciences. Wether ideal or material. Their society did not acknowledge technological and scientifical ability and the mathematicians were disregarded and all of the crafts men ect... were less valued than in europe. The only way to prevail in society was studying literature. Since the north and south dynasties of jin they started a system of testing they call 科举制度 that lasted until the last qing empire which test only letericy skills. The actuall first use of gunpowder was blurrily recorded. The first assured use on the battle field at the battle of crecy. It was probably used earlier in sieges but the records are vague to tell exactly.
July 26th, 2004  
Mark Conley
 
 
maybe the chinese did.

check out the wikipedia entry just for the history of gunpowder. it seems to indicate that big hold up for use in cannon was the lack of a metallurgical skill to make a tube capable of holding the explosion, and not rupturing.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gunpowder#History

July 26th, 2004  
dsj
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mark Conley
maybe the chinese did.

check out the wikipedia entry just for the history of gunpowder. it seems to indicate that big hold up for use in cannon was the lack of a metallurgical skill to make a tube capable of holding the explosion, and not rupturing.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gunpowder#History

That's just rockets. The chinese never had any projectile firing devices.
July 26th, 2004  
Mark Conley
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by dsj
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mark Conley
maybe the chinese did.

check out the wikipedia entry just for the history of gunpowder. it seems to indicate that big hold up for use in cannon was the lack of a metallurgical skill to make a tube capable of holding the explosion, and not rupturing.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gunpowder#History

That's just rockets. The chinese never had any projectile firing devices.
i see. projectile firing devices...and just what do you define as a projectile firing device?

air powered? gunpowder driven?? gun cotton? how about LPG for the fuel..as a compressed gas. What type projectile? solid? sabot? english peas? spitwads?

would that projectile be round, tapered, conical, obloid? would a blow gun dart count as a projectile?

http://www.travelchinaguide.com/intro/history/ming.htm

1368-1644: Ming Dynasty. Another accomplishment of the Ming dynasty was the final and lasting construction of the Great Wall. While the Great Wall had been built in earlier times, most of what is seen today was either built or repaired by the Ming. The brick and granite work was enlarged, the watch towers were redesigned and cannons were placed along its length.

http://www.dummies.com/WileyCDA/Dumm...-POLITICS.html

sung dynasty-12 century. By the twelfth century, the armies of the Sung Dynasty added metal grenades to their arsenal. China pioneered fragmentation bombs, whose casings shattered into deadly shrapnel. Within another hundred years, Chinese factories made hundreds of military rockets and bombs, some filled with poisons, such as arsenic, that released on impact. Others were packed with tar and oil, designed to start fires. The Chinese also built early guns, metal barrels packed with gunpowder, which shot out a rock or a metal ball.

The word never infers that it didnt happen. Distinctly, did not happen. Its like saying a person will never make a very good historian, or that there will never be a mistake made.


I dont know that anyone would have what it takes to answer one of your posts dsj. sure hope you do find someone. Im out of this.
July 26th, 2004  
dsj
 
I meant never had any beofre the europeans. Those gernades were ineffective tricks like the automatic crossbow. I mean gunpowder weapons by the gunpowder kicking the projectile out.
July 26th, 2004  
Mark Conley
 
 
http://www.netsword.com/ubb/Forum1/HTML/002227.html

enjoy