Civilian wearing an antique navy ring




 
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Boots
 
April 7th, 2014  
jleffert7
 

Topic: Civilian wearing an antique navy ring


Hi, I am a civilian who has an old USN ring and I would absolutely love to wear it, but I don't know if it is acceptable. I looked all over the internet to try and find an answer to my question, but I was unsuccessful. I know its not right to wear a masonic ring if you aren't a mason, but I had reason to believe this may be a little different. I had a relative who served in the navy, I'm not sure if this makes any difference. I would in no way try to claim or represent myself as a service member, I just really like the ring.

Please let me know what you think. Thanks
April 7th, 2014  
senojekips
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by jleffert7
Hi, I am a civilian who has an old USN ring and I would absolutely love to wear it, but I don't know if it is acceptable. I looked all over the internet to try and find an answer to my question, but I was unsuccessful. I know its not right to wear a masonic ring if you aren't a mason, but I had reason to believe this may be a little different. I had a relative who served in the navy, I'm not sure if this makes any difference. I would in no way try to claim or represent myself as a service member, I just really like the ring.

Please let me know what you think. Thanks
I have no specific knowledge of these things or the Law within the US, but I would say, "If the ring is Government issue as either a decoration, award or a part of a dress uniform I'd say, No you cant wear it".

However if it is only a piece of personal jewelry, anyone could wear it.

BUT, if as you say it is an antique, (have it valued) then professionally cleaned, wrapped in acid proof paper in a sturdy ring box and locked in a bank security box.
April 7th, 2014  
jleffert7
 
Yes I dont believe there is any law against it, and as far as the antique factor, its worn and marked sterling so I know its not new, but I'm not sure how old. I know it wasn't an award of any kind and I don't believe that they were government issued. So I think I'm safe there.?
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Boots
April 7th, 2014  
Redleg
 
 
Can you post a picture of it here?
That would make it easier to answer your question.
April 7th, 2014  
jleffert7
 
I couldnt figure out how to upload one, but here is one i found online that looks just like it..

April 7th, 2014  
Sevens
 
 
I don't know that a ring specifically violates 10 USC 771 and/or 772, but I wouldn't take the chance personally. Didn't serve? Don't wear things that suggest you did or do.
April 9th, 2014  
MikeP
 
 
Nothing against it and the poor taste police have no real powers.
Personally I would never wear something I never earned.
A person who never put themseles in a position to earn some kind of symbol might have a hard time appreciating this.

I wonder about the "tribal" tats you see so much of. i keep thinking that someday one of these clowns will be swaggering along and a real Maori warrior or somebody similar will pounce and tear their head off.
May 27th, 2014  
dadsgirl
 
 
Question then, what if a relative wanted you to have something like that? Would it be proper then?


Just asking because my Dad gave me his brass US pin.

Question: you see one of my memorial tattoos in the greatest memory of my DA. I had wanted to put Semper Fortis, in a beautiful font and a small yellow heart hanging off it on top of the anchor. Means a lot to me too. Even though I have not served. Always Strong; Courageous, has very, very special meaning to me. My DA made me that way. The yellow heart represents the close friendship we had. And I drew that tattoo myself. So what do you all think?
Because I am a survivor! Went through hell and came back stronger and a better person for it. I have the the scars to prove it. And my DA,(Mom died 25 yrs ago), was proud of me because of it.
May 27th, 2014  
crazytanker
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by MikeP
Nothing against it and the poor taste police have no real powers.
Personally I would never wear something I never earned.
A person who never put themseles in a position to earn some kind of symbol might have a hard time appreciating this.

I wonder about the "tribal" tats you see so much of. i keep thinking that someday one of these clowns will be swaggering along and a real Maori warrior or somebody similar will pounce and tear their head off.
Oh I agree. Just like the tabs that we wear. Gotta earn the right to wear that tab.

Quote:
Originally Posted by dadsgirl
Question then, what if a relative wanted you to have something like that? Would it be proper then?


Just asking because my Dad gave me his brass US pin.
No, not really, because you yourself haven't earned the right to wear that. For instance I wear the Sapper tab, even though I'm a Drill Sergeant, because I've earned the right to wear that tab. The US pin indicates that you are in service to the United States, which is earned by completing basic/AIT.

The only real exception to this are challenge coins, which are unique because you can give these to someone you feel deserves to carry this coin. When you give a challenge coin you're telling them that have to step up and prove they should carry this coin, but also giving them a vote of confidence in them.
May 27th, 2014  
MontyB
 
 
Well just to throw the cat amongst the pigeons I am going to disagree and say that in this particular case you guys are being a bit "precious".

I agree entirely that items "identifying" the person as a service person should not be worn but "keepsakes" and "heirlooms" are in my opinion an entirely different story.
 


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