China Increases Military Spending by 14.7%




 
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March 9th, 2006  
sandy
 

Topic: China Increases Military Spending by 14.7%


http://www.sinodefence.com/news/2006/news06-03-04.asp

Jiang En-Zhu, the spokesman for the ongoing 4th session of the 10th Chinese National People’s Congress, disclosed that China is to raise its military budget by 14.7% in 2006 to 283.8bn RMB (US$35.1bn).
Jiang confirmed the increase in a press conference on 4 March. He explained that much of this rise will be used to cover four aspects: to cover the increase of servicemen’s pay; to offset the increasing fuel price; to invest more on the education; and to cover the purchase of new equipment.
Jiang insisted that China’s military spending is lower than that of ‘some countries’ in terms of both total figure and proportion of the country’s GDP. He said that China is a peace-loving nation, and is committed to a path of peaceful development with "no intention of vigorously developing armaments".
Underestimated Figures
Jiang compared China’s military spending with other major Western nations. In 2005, China’s military spending was US$30.2bn, which is lower than that of the United States (US$401.7bn), United Kingdom (US$48.8bn), Japan (US$45.3bn), and France (US$36.5).
In 2005, the military spending of China is 1.36% of its GDP, which is also lower that that of the United States (3.6%), United Kingdom (2.59%), and France (1.98%).
In 2005, China allocated 7.43% of its overall budget to defence, comparing to the United States (17.8%), France (11.4%), and Germany (9.25%).
However, the United States has several times accused China of understating its military budget.
A previous report by the US think tank Rand in May 2005 estimated that China’s military spending is between 2.3~2.8% of the nation’s GDP, which is 40~70% higher than official Chinese government figures. Other sources estimated that the actual figure could be 2~3 times higher than the published figures.
It is believed that China has excluded certain costs from its annual defence budgets, including the military technology R&D. Some weapon purchases from Russia were also put under special government funding rather than defence budgets.
Neighbour’s Concerns
The People’s Liberation Army (PLA) has seen double-digit increases in its spending since the early 1990s. The increases have caused concern among neighbours Japan and Taiwan.
As Taiwan’s independence trend grows, the Taiwan Strait has already become one of world’s hottest spot. The Chinese Communist Party and the government have repeatedly asked the armed forces to get ready for ‘military struggle’. The recent territory dispute and worsening relation with Japan is another reason that pushes China to raise its military spending.
China insists its military spending increase is in line with the development of its economy and rises in other governments.
March 11th, 2006  
chinese-canadian
 
dont worry,much of it is to increase salary and buy fuels for training
March 12th, 2006  
PJ24
 
 
Yeah, all of those guys have to eat!
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March 12th, 2006  
chinese-canadian
 
and many of them seriously under-paid, compared to civilians
March 12th, 2006  
phoenix80
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by chinese-canadian
and many of them seriously under-paid, compared to civilians
True.

The comapny I visited in Southern China used to pay USD 35 monthly to the production line workers.
March 12th, 2006  
chinese-canadian
 
well...35USD is like 400USD in China...but still underpaid
March 13th, 2006  
Rabs
 
 
Quote:
well...35USD is like 400USD in China...but still underpaid

What?
March 13th, 2006  
chinese-canadian
 
things in China are generally 5-10 times cheaper than in North America

like beer,food, clothes, video games, computer parts, furnitures, books (especially).
March 13th, 2006  
Rabs
 
 
you mean 35 usd is like 400 chinese dollars (yen?) not 400 usd? right
March 13th, 2006  
chinese-canadian
 
en...I can use 35USD in China to buy same loads of goods that you have to pay 400USD for in North America