The Ace of Aces - Page 3




 
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October 1st, 2014  
MontyB
 
 
Adolf Galland flew the Me-262 during the war and the Meteor during his time working with the Argentinian air force and he claimed that it was a fine aircraft. If he could fit the Meteor engines to the Messerschmitt Me 262 airframe he would have had the best fighter in the world.
October 1st, 2014  
BritinAfrica
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by JOC
The concept had been kicking around since the 30's. Sounds like the air ministry dragged their heals on this one. I don't believe it was quite as advanced as the ME-262, sweep wing, speed. However we will never really know since they never came into combat. Sounds like the meteor had better electronics. But had it come out in 1940 it would have blown the socks off the Luffwaff.

Another high tech WW2 weapon that saw it's greatest potential after the war.
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One of the so called Air mInistry experts told Frank Whittle that his jet engine would never work, typical blinkered attitude of the period. The Meteor had a far more reliable engine then the ME262, the Rolls Royce engine fitted to the Meteor had a life of over 100 hours before a major service was required, the 262 engine had an engine life of between 12 and 25 hours before a major service, the 262 engines also had the bad habit of catching fire on start up.
October 1st, 2014  
Remington 1858
 
 

Topic: The Ace of Aces


With reference to the strategic bombing campaign by the USAAF and RAF; One of the most critical targets was the rail transportation system of Western Europe. It was realized by Allied planners that the rail and road system provided Germany the means to react with great speed to any Allied military initiative in France or the Low Countries. Before a Cross Channel invasion could be made, two things had to happen. (1) The German Army had to be cut down to size with casualties on the Eastern Front, and (2) the transportation/communication system of Western Europe had to be severely damaged. By 1944 Germany was fighting on interior lines and could shift even it's limited resources quickly, sometimes achieving local numerical superiority in spite of it's overall numerical inferiority. The bombing campaign against the French rail system caused considerable civilian casualties because the rail lines, with marshaling and switching yards ran right through French towns. I think it's true that post - war analysis showed that the strategic bombing campaign was not as decisive as it's supporters claimed, but I maintain that it was an important contribution to final victory. Also, from 1941-1944, it was one of the only ways that the British and Americans could show the Russians that they were doing their part.
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October 1st, 2014  
JOC
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by BritinAfrica
One of the so called Air mInistry experts told Frank Whittle that his jet engine would never work, typical blinkered attitude of the period. The Meteor had a far more reliable engine then the ME262, the Rolls Royce engine fitted to the Meteor had a life of over 100 hours before a major service was required, the 262 engine had an engine life of between 12 and 25 hours before a major service, the 262 engines also had the bad habit of catching fire on start up.
Sounds like the air ministry was a bit shortsighted.

The Germans had a definite quality control issue with that jet engine. I don't know if that was true of their other jets as well, since so few were produced. It also needed longer runways which the allies made sure to bomb and expensive fuel (which was a precious commodity in Germany at the time).

However all being said the ME-262 must be given credit though for it's short lived combat ability. The Allied pilot had their hands full when they came up against it and didn't fair to well.
October 1st, 2014  
JOC
 
 

Topic: misc


Quote:
Originally Posted by Remington 1858
With reference to the strategic bombing campaign by the USAAF and RAF; One of the most critical targets was the rail transportation system of Western Europe. It was realized by Allied planners that the rail and road system provided Germany the means to react with great speed to any Allied military initiative in France or the Low Countries. Before a Cross Channel invasion could be made, two things had to happen. (1) The German Army had to be cut down to size with casualties on the Eastern Front, and (2) the transportation/communication system of Western Europe had to be severely damaged. By 1944 Germany was fighting on interior lines and could shift even it's limited resources quickly, sometimes achieving local numerical superiority in spite of it's overall numerical inferiority. The bombing campaign against the French rail system caused considerable civilian casualties because the rail lines, with marshaling and switching yards ran right through French towns. I think it's true that post - war analysis showed that the strategic bombing campaign was not as decisive as it's supporters claimed, but I maintain that it was an important contribution to final victory. Also, from 1941-1944, it was one of the only ways that the British and Americans could show the Russians that they were doing their part.


Thereís no dought the allied bombing helped prepare the way for D-Day. The Casualties on the Eastern front were a constant source of attrition.
Virtually paralleling the Normandy fighting was the Germans largest catastrophe to date on the eastern front operation Bagration, the destruction of Army Group Center. These dual defeats Normandy (Falaise) and Bagration virtually crushed the Germans ability to wage any kind of offensive war. Note Yes Hitler attacked in the battle of the Bulge and in Hungry but these was desperate attacks using all available reserves.
Although the Germans were good at moving the manufacturing around and to smaller facilities the sheer amount of bombs dropped had to cause some setbacks. Bombings such as the Ruhr dams, and the ball bearing plants and Ploesti oilfields to name a few.
Also sure we didnít have between 3 or 4 million men in Europe before 44, but still we drained valuable German resources in North Africa and Italy. I believe the allies had close to Ĺ million men in North Africa. Also there was the war in the Atlantic also drawing German resources.
October 3rd, 2014  
BritinAfrica
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Remington 1858
With reference to the strategic bombing campaign by the USAAF and RAF;.
After Britain's defeat at Dunkirk and the subsequent victory during the Battle of Britain and the Blitz, the only way Britain could hit back was the bombing campaign, which went a long way to raising British moral that they were at least "hitting back."
October 3rd, 2014  
George
 
A big what if is..if they had hit the oil industry excusivly, both Ploesti and the syn oil plants as soon as they could have been effectively hit how things would have gone. In the Pacific if the B-29s had been sent to Darwin to wreck the Dutch East Indies oil fields instead of China and/or The Mariannas the Japanese might have collapsed as a modern mechanized State sooner than the way it actually went.
October 3rd, 2014  
JOC
 
 

Topic: Early British Contributions


Quote:
Originally Posted by BritinAfrica
After Britain's defeat at Dunkirk and the subsequent victory during the Battle of Britain and the Blitz, the only way Britain could hit back was the bombing campaign, which went a long way to raising British moral that they were at least "hitting back."
And it wasn't long afterword's they were hitting them in North Africa as well. I believe by mid 1940 The British were fighting the Axis in Libya. These actions ended up siphoning off valuable German troops away from the Eastern front and ended up as an Axis catastrophe in 43. With only a handful making it to Italy.
This as you mention combined with the bombing champagne overcame the stigma of the early period and showed Hitler the British were not about to be left in the background twiddling their thumbs.
October 3rd, 2014  
JOC
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by George
A big what if is..if they had hit the oil industry excusivly, both Ploesti and the syn oil plants as soon as they could have been effectively hit how things would have gone. In the Pacific if the B-29s had been sent to Darwin to wreck the Dutch East Indies oil fields instead of China and/or The Mariannas the Japanese might have collapsed as a modern mechanized State sooner than the way it actually went.
George I do believe a lot of the Japanese ships carrying the oil were sunk by US subs
October 4th, 2014  
BritinAfrica
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by JOC
And it wasn't long afterword's they were hitting them in North Africa as well. I believe by mid 1940 The British were fighting the Axis in Libya. These actions ended up siphoning off valuable German troops away from the Eastern front and ended up as an Axis catastrophe in 43. With only a handful making it to Italy.
This as you mention combined with the bombing champagne overcame the stigma of the early period and showed Hitler the British were not about to be left in the background twiddling their thumbs.
What REALLY annoys me, Stalin accused Churchill more or less of cowardice in the delay in opening a second front when Britain was not ready. Lets not forget Stalin sent Hitler a telegram congratulating him after the British were evacuated at Dunkirk, as well as sending Hitler raw material for his war machine. Its a pity Churchill didn't remind him of the fact.
 


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