4 vs 5 man crews, - Page 2




 
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November 14th, 2014  
Yossarian
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by crazytanker
If you ever get the chance to check out one of the Army's venture programs. Alot of the time they'll let you get inside of the tank, and possibly even drive it, which is incredibly easy.

Really ? Interesting, I haven't been in a tank since an M 60A3 I believe as a young child.

It's engrossing to see the evolution, design philosophies and approaches over the last 100 years in AFVs. Especially the crew layout.
November 14th, 2014  
crazytanker
 
 
Driving a tank is incredibly easy. You have two throttles. If you want to go forward, you push both throttles forward. It you want to go backwards, you pull both back to you. Of you want to go right, you hold the right throttle in neutral and push the left forward. If to m you want to go left, you hold the left throttle in neutral and push the right one forward.
November 14th, 2014  
Yossarian
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by crazytanker
Driving a tank is incredibly easy. You have two throttles. If you want to go forward, you push both throttles forward. It you want to go backwards, you pull both back to you. Of you want to go right, you hold the right throttle in neutral and push the left forward. If to m you want to go left, you hold the left throttle in neutral and push the right one forward.

Similar in scope to bulldozer maybe? however most modern MBT's have neutral steer to some degree. Most dozers do not. I love "walking" the treads on dozers due to this, now that is fun. But could only imagine a modern tracked AFV in terms of joyriding. Although with respect I do still understand these vehicles deathly serious mission.
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November 14th, 2014  
crazytanker
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yossarian
Similar in scope to bulldozer maybe? however most modern MBT's have neutral steer to some degree. Most dozers do not. I love "walking" the treads on dozers due to this, now that is fun. But could only imagine a modern tracked AFV in terms of joyriding. Although with respect I do still understand these vehicles deathly serious mission.
Sorta but not really. This is what it looks like. See the two throttles?
November 15th, 2014  
Yossarian
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by crazytanker
Sorta but not really. This is what it looks like. See the two throttles?

Gearing layout must be completely different as well, different machines have had different concepts over the years undoboutly, interestingly many American tanks used to field two engines, namely each one powered on set of tracks.

Russians used lever steering linkages that were quite demanding in their older designs, Germans put their gearboxes up front (potential bad idea). But things look streamlined and at least in western tanks today similar and almost standardized in layout of the drive train. (different powerplants and components of course.)

Once again of great interest.

Kudos for the visual aid as well.
November 15th, 2014  
tetvet
 
I'm thinking the Russian T-34 had a crew of 3 , not sure on that , but anyone that can drive a zero turn lawnmower can drive a tank .
November 16th, 2014  
JOC
 
 
The T-34 had a 4 man crew, the up gunned version T-34/85 had a 5 man crew. From what I understand they weren't built for comfort. Which is-was generally the case for most Russian - Soviet AFV's
November 16th, 2014  
crazytanker
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by JOC
The T-34 had a 4 man crew, the up gunned version T-34/85 had a 5 man crew. From what I understand they weren't built for comfort. Which is-was generally the case for most Russian - Soviet AFV's
Like I said, when it comes to weapons and machines of war, Russians are slightly insane. They were built to get the job done, regardless of the comfort of the crew members. Crew comfort was and still remains a secondary objective to Russian war-machine designers.
November 16th, 2014  
Remington 1858
 
 
The Soviets produced tanks with three man crews, the loaders position being taken by an autoloader that selected rounds from a carousel under the turret floor. How well this works, I can't say having never seen it in action, But I have inspected captured former Soviet tanks and they are very small in comparison to Western designs. The men who serve these vehicles must be small in stature.
Of course, this makes the tank a smaller target and the Soviets produced very small, powerfully armed designs that were always significantly lighter in weight than Western models.
The Swedes had the S-tank, a turretless model with an autoloading gun. The crew on that tank was three guys( I think).
Reducing crew size accomplishes some objectives, but creates other problems. Fewer men to do maintenance tasks, for security watch and other housekeeping requirements.
November 17th, 2014  
A Can of Man
 
 
http://mashable.com/2014/05/06/oculu...y-drive-tanks/

Check it.
 


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