WWII Quiz - Page 94




 
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July 19th, 2006  
perseus
 
 
I suspect you are thinking of the method of refelling. The French used special tankers which could only fill the tanks one at a time, whereas the Germans used 'Jerrycans' which could fill the tanks simultaneously.

If this the correct answer, I am away until Monday so please carry on without me.
July 19th, 2006  
Reiben
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by perseus
I suspect you are thinking of the method of refelling. The French used special tankers which could only fill the tanks one at a time, whereas the Germans used 'Jerrycans' which could fill the tanks simultaneously.

If this the correct answer, I am away until Monday so please carry on without me.
right answer for second part, but why the delay? Its related to refuelling. But refuelling is not the answer.
July 21st, 2006  
Reiben
 
 
Have you guys given up???
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July 23rd, 2006  
perseus
 
 
Quote:
What delayed Generals Bruneau 1st Armoured dividion attack on 15 May 1940 was delayed for what reason? Also compare the reason to Germans equivalent?
Breuneau lost contact with the petrol tankers.

Other reasons for the delay included, refugees on the roads which also prevented rapid deployment of the tanks. There were also communication problems due to the complex command structure which prevented a rapid response. Georges had to go through another subordinate commander Blanchard in charge of the 1st army who then relayed the message to Bruneau. There also seems to be a command to cancel the counter attack to bolster up another division.
July 24th, 2006  
MontyB
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Reiben
Have you guys given up???
Havent given up just been kind of busy else where.
July 26th, 2006  
perseus
 
 
Does someone wish to answer another question whilst we are waiting of the answer? perhaps if there is no action within 2 days we should move on?
July 26th, 2006  
Reiben
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by perseus
Does someone wish to answer another question whilst we are waiting of the answer? perhaps if there is no action within 2 days we should move on?
You correctly stated that Germans used Jerry cans, whilst the French used tankers, which slowed the rate of refuelling.

The tankers lost contact with the tanks. The tanks were short of fuel and the petrol in the tankers was required for the attack. The counter attack near Dinant was abandoned. The tanks remained in and around Flavion until the tankers arrived. The tankers were found at Oret 5 miles from Flavion, but due to the number of tanks it was too late to fill them with petrol.

Perseus was closest, over to you.
July 26th, 2006  
perseus
 
 
During the June 1940 evacuation from France probably the worst disaster in British Maritime history occurred (worse than the Titanic). What ship was involved from what port, what did they do wrong? Contrast this with the evacuation on the Floristan.
July 27th, 2006  
Reiben
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by perseus
During the June 1940 evacuation from France probably the worst disaster in British Maritime history occurred (worse than the Titanic). What ship was involved from what port, what did they do wrong? Contrast this with the evacuation on the Floristan.
HMT Lancastria sunk on 17 June 1940 carrying over 6,000 people evacuated from France. The port was St Nazaire. The ship was sunk from bombs from Dornier DO17s. or Junkers 88s, seem to be conflicting reports on that The germans straffed those in the water. The ship was dangerous overloaded and seems that MoD ignored the ships captain about the maximum load restriction.
July 27th, 2006  
perseus
 
 
Reiben

I think this is near enough. What I was looking for was that the Lancastria was anchored, waiting of a destroyer escort rather than circling near the harbour, despite being in an air raid a few hours earlier. It is estimated that 3500 people may have died in this incident.
The Floristan in contrast was on its way home and managed to swerve the bombs, the attacking aircraft being brought down by Bren gun fire.

It is interesting that as many as 144 000 British servicemen and 47 000 allied soldiers were evacuated from south of the Somme during that period.