WWII Quiz - Page 118




 
--
 
October 18th, 2006  
boris116
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by perseus
Who declared war on Britain and America in 1943?
The Mussolini's Fascist Republic of Como?
October 19th, 2006  
perseus
 
 
Boris

Good try, it is not the answer I was looking for though. However, if you can find a reference to an official declaration of war against Britain and America by Mussolini's new republic at that time you may have the question.

It is along the right lines though, in the sense it was more of a movement rather than a true country.
October 19th, 2006  
MontyB
 
 
January 9 1943. The Nanking Government in China had declares war on the United States and Britain.
--
October 19th, 2006  
perseus
 
 
It's amazing what you find out asking these questions! I checked 1943 for other declarations but could not find any, then am presented with two possibilities. At least in your case Monty you are correct

The Nanking Government signed the Anti-Comintern Pact of 1941 and declared war on the United States and Great Britain on January 9, 1943.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Axis_Powers

However the one I had in mind was the Indian National Army .
Subhas became the president of the Indian Independence Movement in East Asia. He formally took the leadership of INA on 25 August and dedicated himself in bringing discipline within its rank and file.
On 21 October 1943 Subhas, popularly called Netaji, declared the formation of the Provisional Government of Azad Hind and on the 23rd declared war on Britain and America.
http://banglapedia.search.com.bd/HT/I_0046.htm

Which led to some bizzare confontrations:

The Indian National Army saw plenty of action (as did their Burmese equivalent). The highlight of the force's campaign in Burma was the planting of the Indian national flag by the 'Bose Battalion' during the battle of Frontier Hill in 1944, although it was Japanese troops from the 55th Cavalry, 1/29th Infantry and 2/143rd Infantry who did most of the fighting. This battle also had the curious incidence of three Sikh companies of the Bose Battalion exchanging insults and fire with two Sikh companies of the 7/16th Punjab Regt.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Axis_Powers

I guess it's your turn Monty although perhaps Boris deserves a turn, whoever asks first!
October 19th, 2006  
MontyB
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by perseus
It's amazing what you find out asking these questions! I checked 1943 for other declarations but could not find any, then am presented with two possibilities. At least in your case Monty you are correct

The Nanking Government signed the Anti-Comintern Pact of 1941 and declared war on the United States and Great Britain on January 9, 1943.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Axis_Powers

However the one I had in mind was the Indian National Army .
Subhas became the president of the Indian Independence Movement in East Asia. He formally took the leadership of INA on 25 August and dedicated himself in bringing discipline within its rank and file.
On 21 October 1943 Subhas, popularly called Netaji, declared the formation of the Provisional Government of Azad Hind and on the 23rd declared war on Britain and America.
http://banglapedia.search.com.bd/HT/I_0046.htm

Which led to some bizzare confontrations:

The Indian National Army saw plenty of action (as did their Burmese equivalent). The highlight of the force's campaign in Burma was the planting of the Indian national flag by the 'Bose Battalion' during the battle of Frontier Hill in 1944, although it was Japanese troops from the 55th Cavalry, 1/29th Infantry and 2/143rd Infantry who did most of the fighting. This battle also had the curious incidence of three Sikh companies of the Bose Battalion exchanging insults and fire with two Sikh companies of the 7/16th Punjab Regt.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Axis_Powers

I guess it's your turn Monty although perhaps Boris deserves a turn, whoever asks first!
Since Boris answered first I am happy to pass.
October 20th, 2006  
boris116
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by MontyB
Since Boris answered first I am happy to pass.
I couldn't find any link to confirm my answer, so I can't accept the Honor

MontyB, your turn!
October 20th, 2006  
MontyB
 
 
Well in that case I will go with something easy.
Who was Ito Morimura?
October 20th, 2006  
Dean
 
 
Another famous spy network operating in Hawaii was under a Japanese named Commander Itaru Tachibana. Earlier, in 1930, Tachibana had entered the United States and enrolled as a language student at the University of Pennsylvania, but later switched to the University of Southern California and from there worked in a spy network. However, he was arrested by the FBI while trying to recruit ex-navy officers to spy for him in Hawaii.
Tachibana's work was carried by a Takeo Yoshikawa who was transferred from the Japanese Navy to the Foreign Office. In August, 1941, he was sent to Honolulu under the cover name of vice-consul Ito Morimura. Though not a professional spy he was nevertheless adaptable, versatile, imaginative and effective. He frequented the Shuncho-ro Restaurant which had an excellent view of the harbor. To be more clandestine, the Japanese spy network also used a German named Dr. Keuhn, whose attractive and gregarious daughter Ruth played her full part by making friends with American naval officers at parties and tennis courts. Ruth started a beauty parlor and learned a great deal by listening to the gossip of her clients, mainly U.S. officers' wives. Yoshikawa had an eye for detail and a mass of information was collected, including names, numbers and technical idiosyncrasies of ship movements and transmitted to the Hawaiian Japanese consul. Although American Intelligence officers were aware that the U.S. Naval fleet was being watched by the Japanese, they were skeptical that Japan had any heinous design for Hawaii. Further, Japanese counter intelligence was very effective in confusing American intelligence by getting all sorts of naval information from every Japanese embassy and consulate around the world -- ranging from Stockholm to Cape Town, and from Geneva to Naples as well as that from Hawaii.

Dean.
October 20th, 2006  
MontyB
 
 
Indeed, I was originally going to ask about Dr Keuhn but there was all sorts of issues verifying his actually name and then it turned out there was a German fighter ace of the same name which would have confused things more.

Anyway over to you.
October 21st, 2006  
Dean
 
 
Thank-you again, Monty.
During the Battle for Berlin, the Russians were basically attacking anything that moved, and usually winning. However, there were some strongpoints that were far harder to take then others. What were two of the three toughest places for the Russians to take?
This question is somewhat subjective. Because of this, I would really appreciate it if you could explain your answer. That way, if your answer does not agree with mine, I can evaluate it and see if you realy have a point.

Dean.