Worst Pieces of Crap That Have Ever Been Issued: 1. Rifles - Page 3




 
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February 24th, 2009  
BritinAfrica
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by 03USMC
I do know that in the 80's on the Gen-1 M9's it was a problem. Mainly in training commands and I believe it was upwards of 10,000 rounds when the hair line cracks were becoming a problem.

Since then I haven't heard much about it and don't recall seeing any bulletins recently.
Thanks for the info.
February 24th, 2009  
mmarsh
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by 5.56X45mm
Well, the worst ever issued weapon in my opinion was the French Chauchat. WORST PIECE OF HUMAN FILTH EVER ISSUED.
Except the Chauchat was a LMG, not a rifle. The problem of the chauchat was that it was too finicky a gun to be used in less than idea conditions, such as the trenches of WWI, where dirt, grim, etc would foul the gun up. However when the gun was used outside the trenches such is in 1918 its faults were less apparent. Still, nobody is going argue that the Chauchat was the greatest LMG ever made. The French Army got rid of it soon after WWI ended.

But back to the top: the Worst RIFLE. My vote goes to the Italian M91 Mannlichier-Carcano. Underpowered, used a poorly produced munition, inaccuarate at both short and long range due to a nonadjustable rear sight.

The gun was so unpopular that where ever it was sent, it was simply thrown away for something else. The Finns and later the Italians preferred the Russian Mosin-Nagant compared to this horrible device.

And strangely, this is the gun that was supposed to have shot JFK. A rather odd choice for sniper weapon.
February 25th, 2009  
SHERMAN
 
 
Quote:
Was JFK killed by Lee Harvey Oswald?

NOT here!
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February 25th, 2009  
BritinAfrica
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by SHERMAN
NOT here!
Why not here? It was a reply to the thread and pertinant to a crappy rifle. There was no intention of starting a new threat here, just the statement that it could lead to a new thread.

I have however, moved the post to a new thread.
April 17th, 2009  
Andrius_LT
 
 
Sweden made H&K G3 or AK-4, this gun shoots only then he wants had two of them in a year.Both had jamming and bullet feding problems.
April 17th, 2009  
KJ
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andrius_LT
Sweden made H&K G3 or AK-4, this gun shoots only then he wants had two of them in a year.Both had jamming and bullet feding problems.

Thatīs because you got all our 30 year old rejects..LOL
Along with all our other surplus **** ready for the scrapheap.
Make sure your magazine springs are intact, most feedingproblems with that type stems from the magazine.

The few AK4,s still in use over here are the sniper version for the national guard..

In my opinion you could have gotten more modern equipment not in use anymore, like the first AK5 models that are only dated by ten years or so.
They are atleast reliable.
April 17th, 2009  
Andrius_LT
 
 
Yes those guns are old...magazines problems are well known to us, its pretty annoying in firing range,then ammo jams in midle of the magazine and you have to reload in another. And I had big problem with the bolt. Then I release the cocking handle the bolt with the round dont come back to the starting position.
Today our army is buying H&K G36KA4.
P.S.Sorry for my english
April 17th, 2009  
KJ
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andrius_LT
Yes those guns are old...magazines problems are well known to us, its pretty annoying in firing range,then ammo jams in midle of the magazine and you have to reload in another. And I had big problem with the bolt. Then I release the cocking handle the bolt with the round dont come back to the starting position.
Today our army is buying H&K G36KA4.
P.S.Sorry for my english
Well at the range itīs anoying, in the real world it is a matter of life and death.
Heavy bitches too.
They are old, worked rather well during their day but I wouldnīt be caught dead with one now.
January 9th, 2010  
franzmaximilian
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by mmarsh
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But back to the top: the Worst RIFLE. My vote goes to the Italian M91 Mannlichier-Carcano. Underpowered, used a poorly produced munition, inaccuarate at both short and long range due to a nonadjustable rear sight.

The gun was so unpopular that where ever it was sent, it was simply thrown away for something else. The Finns and later the Italians preferred the Russian Mosin-Nagant compared to this horrible device.

And strangely, this is the gun that was supposed to have shot JFK. A rather odd choice for sniper weapon.

Let me disagree with your vote. There is possibly some misinformation and a couple of mistakes in your assertions. First is that the rifle that shot JFK was a M91 when it was actually a M91/38. An evolution of the M91, but a WW2 weapon, so totally OT.
Second is the poorly produced ammunition. I have read lots of critics about the equipment and the weapons available to the Italian Army in WW1 in tenths of books, but I never came through bad comments about ammunition quality. WW1 vintage ammunitions (from a box found in the ice) has been fired recently by friends with full satisfaction. The myth about poor ammunition is something that grew post WW2, when an abundance of M91 (in all variants) became available internationally on the civilian markets. Very few knew outside Italy that the actual calibre of the 6,5 x 52 was 0,268 inches, while other ammunition in 6,5 mm such as the better famed Swedish 6,5 x 55 is 0.266 and others are 0.264. This caused the manufacture and use of totally wrong ammunition that lead to very poor performances. The original 6,5 x 52 has ballistic characteristics that are perfectly comparable with the much better famed 30-30 Winchester and the 6,5 x 55, using a less aggressive charge that leads to a longer lifetime for the gun with much less maintenance. All these are important aspects of a military weapon.
The real weakness of the 6,5 x 52 ammunition is it's stability at the impact. It was not uncommon for a bullet to come out of the hit body without leaving other damage but it's neat passage: too "humanitarian" for a military bullet!

The M91 was also rugged and possibly better than its opponents Mauser, Steyr and Mannlicher in terms of sensitivity to dirt, sand and mud.
Also, it used a symmetrical 6 cartridge loader (vs. 5 of its opponents) and was easier to reload than the Steyr whose loader could be inserted in one way only. Try yourself at night while wearing gloves!
Not to mention that field dismantling and mounting the M91 was foolproof.
The M91 was also extremely robust. The Germans captured hundreds of thousands of M91, M91/24 and M91/38 in 1943 and rebored many of those in 8mm Mauser, a much more powerful ammunition, to be distributed to second line troops. Not only it resisted well to the higher pressures but it was regarded as a reliable gun when Mausers were not available.

I would like to know where you found references to the Italians preferring the Moisin Nagant. I have never read anything about this in tenths of books (or again are you talking about WW2?). Could you please mention any reference?

If we talk about the worst gun of WW2, I may agree with you. The M91 (and subversions) was totally outdated, though still reliable within its limits.
At the time of the First World War, though not one of the best, the M91 was perfectly adequate, relatively inexpensive, easy to train illiterate peasants on, reliable and performed quite well.
January 13th, 2010  
Hook160th
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by 03USMC
I do know that in the 80's on the Gen-1 M9's it was a problem. Mainly in training commands and I believe it was upwards of 10,000 rounds when the hair line cracks were becoming a problem.

Since then I haven't heard much about it and don't recall seeing any bulletins recently.
This was a problem then. In 1988, I attended a shooting course in Mississippi. The Navy guys that were there experienced slide failures two days in a row. In each instance, the slide broke and hit each man in the right eye. They were fairly nasty cuts.