Will Anyone Surpass the USA in invention? - Page 2




 
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October 15th, 2004  
godofthunder9010
 
 
Exactly, so for memorization and recall of facts, you want to hire Japanese. If you want new or different ideas, go American. That was the results of a study my brother ran across in one of his economics classes.
October 15th, 2004  
A Can of Man
 
 
That is beginning to change though.
Take Korea for example. Guess what it's major strong selling point is right now? Show business. That's right. Movies and TV series are a huge hit and are big exports all around Asia so the strength in the Korean economy in fact has to do with a field that is all about creativity. Ironic huh?
I wouldn't say Japan's lacking invention. Just look at their ability to miniturize stuff. Not to mention the whole concept of the pocket portable music player is a purely Japanese invention. So they do invent. Just not all inventions are obvious.
America's strength again, is their ability to hold on to the best and brightest along with their ability to bring in the best and brightest from abroad. These guys that totally rock the exams and stuff... they're heading to America.

Quote:
Originally Posted by godofthunder9010
Exactly, so for memorization and recall of facts, you want to hire Japanese. If you want new or different ideas, go American. That was the results of a study my brother ran across in one of his economics classes.
October 15th, 2004  
FlyingFrog
 
Of course USA will be surpassed in terms of Invention.
Just a question of time.

Last year there graduated more college students in China than in USA, for the first time. And more and more kids will enjoy colleges in coming years in China.


I think only China and India will overtake USA in terms of invention, may it need 50 years, no problem, 50 years is so short in our long history
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October 15th, 2004  
godofthunder9010
 
 
Well, in this category the United States controls its own destiny to a very large degree. Also, its a field that is frought with unpredictability. The USA has more or less dominated the field of non-military invension from early in the 20th century and continuing through till today. Military-wise, its very debateable -- the USA may or may not be the best, and may or may not have been the best, but always one of the best after WW2.
October 16th, 2004  
Bratwurst
 
Quote:
One item is invention. Inventing new concepts, whether for peacetime or wartime or anything inbetween, the USA still probably leads in this category. Case in point, the United States invented Stealth Technology that the world is now chasing. TONS more examples, but you get the idea.
This is a common misconception. Some may call it delusion of grandeur, I blame it on the fat content in fast food, clogging vital blood vessels.

You can't narrow scientific progress down to a country, not anymore. Even if you did, maybe by criteria such as number of registered patents, then you wouldn't find America to be Nr.1 - sorry man....

This is nicely illustrated on the example of Stealth Tech:

Quote:
In the nineteenth century, Scottish physicist James Clerk Maxwell developed a series of mathematical formulas to predict how electromagnetic radiation would scatter when reflected from a specific geometric shape. His equations were later refined by the German scientist, Arnold Johannes Sommerfield. But for a long time, even after aircraft designers attempted to reduce radar signatures for aircraft like the U-2 and A-12 OXCART in the late 1950s, the biggest obstacle to success was the lack of theoretical models of how radar reflected off a surface. In the 1960s, Russian scientist Pyotr Ufimtsev began developing equations for predicting the reflection of electromagnetic waves from simple two-dimensional shapes. His work was regularly collected and translated into English and provided to U.S. scientists. By the early 1970s, a few U.S. scientists, mathematicians, and aircraft designers began to realize that it was possible to use these theories to design aircraft with substantially reduced radar signatures. Lockheed Aircraft, working under a contract to the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, soon began development of the F-117 stealth fighter.