Why no love for India? - Page 14




View Poll Results :Will India or China rise up in the future to take the lead in Asia?
India 11 26.19%
China 29 69.05%
Other (please specify) 2 4.76%
Voters: 42. You may not vote on this poll

 
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Boots
 
December 9th, 2004  
NgoDinhdiem
 
i think indians have an inferior issue with chinese. i think indians are jelous that the west invest do much econimically in china and not india, i think the U.S and SOME europeans see china as threst and a miltary threat in the future and is oblivious towards india as a military significance. inidans do not ahve a more technooligial adcance over military in anything, the only thing india does better than china today is more ships in the sea, and in IT fileds, abd perhaps bredding, but as for evrtyhuing else econmically and militarily china in 20 years will compete with the americans, while India be stil competing with pakistan.

I think India and China should co-operate more, they will both benfit. but I think india still crying and vying for the world's attentions, that most Indians belives belongs to them not china
December 9th, 2004  
Kane
 
Quote:
I think India and China should co-operate more, they will both benfit. but I think india still crying and vying for the world's attentions, that most Indians belives belongs to them not china
It's probably because of India's urge for national identity in the World.
December 9th, 2004  
nomisme
 
Many chinese are willing to help their country develop by bringing high technology and devoting themselves into scientific research. I believe China will be the leading nation in all aspects in the world.
Also, China will bring peace to the world and we hope to earn more respect from other countries.
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Boots
December 9th, 2004  
Kane
 
Quote:
I believe China will be the leading nation in all aspects in the world.
Not quite.

Quote:
Also, China will bring peace to the world and we hope to earn more respect from other countries.
No nation in history or in this world brung peace. Peace will only exist if the whole world cooperate. However, I quite agree on you about the "hope to earn more respect from other countries".
December 9th, 2004  
Xion
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by NgoDinhdiem
i think indians have an inferior issue with chinese. i think indians are jelous that the west invest do much econimically in china and not india, i think the U.S and SOME europeans see china as threst and a miltary threat in the future and is oblivious towards india as a military significance
Thats true with me and I have already talked about that in this same thread if you can go back a few pages.I don't know about rest of the Indians but I think what you said is true.


Quote:
Originally Posted by NgoDinhdiem
but as for evrtyhuing else econmically and militarily china in 20 years will compete with the americans, while India be stil competing with pakistan.
thats you spewing hatred and shows your ignorance, well only time will tell who will be ahead of whom.... no point in arguing now.20 years ago from today China was no where to be compared with USA, but the equations are changing now...just keep that always in mind bro [/quote][/code]
December 9th, 2004  
kotakk
 
 
If China and India Co-operate Then maybe their efforts will bear fruit faster.We have some good points and they do to.If we co-operate then
it will open up a world of oppertunities.
December 9th, 2004  
isp
 

Topic: Chinese F-10


Chinese F-10 made by Chinese themselves that what’s I want to mention about it. Yes. The LCA made by the India as well, but how the performance it is? Did they can compete with F/C 18 (US fighter – plane). I think we don’t need to talk about Russian plane SU-30 (the Tech not invented by ours). You never get proud of on another country’s Technology! You just throw the US dollar out and you will get SU-30.

Here is Military Forum I can get the Chinese F-10 picture to prove my, how about you and LCA?
December 9th, 2004  
kotakk
 
 
Hey man don't get abusive.Time and time again it has been proven that
Fighter jets which are more manoeverable ,may sometimes prove to be more effective.
India exports as well as imports Defense equipment.
India Exports the ArjunMBD tank to Russia.India Exports the Advanced Light Helicopter To Israel.And anyways the Su-30's are manufactured right here.As for your F-10 ,It looks like a cheap Copy.
Alright.
December 9th, 2004  
Kane
 
Quote:
As for your F-10 ,It looks like a cheap Copy.
Alright.
Cheap? Hmmm...not quite. The project and research is more expensive and time consuming than you possibily can imagine. Either than that you have all of the research scientists who have put their deepest efforts to construct the first prototype flyable. Maybe you should rephrase of what you have just said.

A Copy? A copy of what? There is no aircraft in existance that has the same Airframe as the J-10. However, The J-10 does have a similar model to the Isreali Lavi, but the Lavi project was a complete failure and the prototype was never flown.
December 9th, 2004  
kotakk
 
 
Latest Chinese Warplane Flies with US Technology
By David Isenberg - Asia Times 12-3-2


US Technology Appears In New Chinese Warplane Via Israel

The recent unveiling (sort of) of China's first domestically-designed (sort of) fighter jet was the culmination of a long saga of international military-hardware wheeling and dealing that has seen US-designed or -funded high-tech weaponry fall into the hands of potential military rivals.

The showpiece of many years' work, dating back to the late 1980s, recently happened - albeit unobserved - when China confirmed the existence of, but did not unveil, the Jian-10 fighter jet. It had been reported that the J-10 (F-10 being the export version, using North Atlantic Treaty Organization designation) would be shown in public for the first time during the fourth China International Aviation and Aerospace Exhibition (Airshow China 2002) held in Zhuhai in southern Guangdong province from November 4-10, but the plane did not appear.

The J-10 is a multi-role single-engine and single-seat tactical fighter, with a combat radius of 1,000 kilometers. Although billed as a domestically produced fighter, in truth the J-10 could not have happened without the help of other countries, especially
Israel.

The program began in the late 1980s and is thought to be based on an Israeli design. It contains Israeli and Russian avionics, and is powered by Russian engines.

Chinese engineers developed the J-10 from a single F-16 provided by Pakistan, and with assistance from Israeli engineers associated with Israel's US-financed Lavi fighter program, which was canceled in 1987, according to the Federation of American Scientists website. The Lavi was based on the US F-16 and built with US$1.3 billion in aid from Washington.

In 1983, when US support for the Lavi commenced, the program was opposed vigorously by the Defense Department, partly because of re-export concerns. An early supporter of the Lavi was George Shultz, then secretary of state in the administration of US president Ronald Reagan. Shultz would later label his advocacy of the program a "costly mistake".

Only in early 1995 did the US government make public its concerns about Israel's Lavi-related technology re-exports to China. David Lari, director general of Israel's Ministry of Defense, acknowledged in an Associated Press interview that "some technology on aircraft" had been sold to China and that some Israeli companies may not have "clean hands".

Yet China's acquisition of the Russian Su-27, after China had attempted for years to develop the J-10 aircraft with equivalent technology to perform similar functions, is seen by some experts as a sign that China lacks confidence in its domestic industrial
capabilities.

Though it has never been certain precisely what specific technologies and systems Israel provided, it was reported that the Jian-10's radar and fire-control system is the Israeli-made ELM-2021 system, which can simultaneously track six air targets and lock on to the four most threatening targets for destruction.

In December 1991, US intelligence officials announced that Israel planned to open a government-coordinated and sponsored "arms office" in China. Given what the Israelis had to offer, and what the Chinese needed, it was most likely that a transfer of avionics and other technologies developed in the Lavi program would ensue, since there was a void in the Chinese avionics and fire-control system capability due to the 1989 termination of a US-Chinese program in response to Tiananmen Square.

China and Israel started collaboration in the early 1980s and full-scale cooperation was under way officially by 1984. As neither China nor Israel was capable of developing the propulsion system required by the J-10, in 1991 China acquired the AI31F turbofan engine from Russia for incorporation into the J-10 fighter. This engine is also used in the Su-27 air-superiority fighter that Chinese acquired from Russia. As the performance of the AL31F engine is significantly better than that of the American PW1120 originally slated for the Lavi, it may be anticipated that the performance of the J-10 will be accordingly enhanced. Built by the Chengdu Aircraft Industrial Corp, the J-10 attempts to rival current fourth-generation Western fighters. China has inked a 10-year deal with the Russian engine maker SRPC Salut for 300 Al-31F engines for its J-10 program and will begin production of the jets next year.

The plane is said to have capabilities similar to the Su-27, the Russian MiG-29 and the US F-16 fighter jets, but with an estimated cost of less than $10 million, it could rival other jet makers on the international market.

In March 1997, despite official denials from Israeli officials, the US Office of Naval Intelligence in its unclassified "Worldwide Challenges to Naval Strike Warfare" restated more strongly than it had the previous year its belief that US-derived technology from the canceled Israeli Lavi fighter was being used on China's new F-10 fighter. It said, "The design has been undertaken with substantial direct external assistance, primarily from Israel and Russia, with indirect assistance through access to US technologies." In fact, according to the annual intelligence report, "the F-10 is a single-seat, light multi-role fighter based heavily on the canceled Israeli Lavi program".