Why didn't the Nazis Have "Special Forces" - Page 4




 
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July 24th, 2008  
georgerr
 
 
During the Cold War, US Army Special Forces detachments were pre-positioned at various locations in West Germany and Berlin. These teams were to blend into the local population, when a Soviet invasion occurred, and form teams for sabotage and intelligence gathering. Just as the OSS did in WWII.
September 18th, 2008  
Papashah41
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by AussieNick
I've been reading up on the topic of special forces operations, and it seems to me that the Nazis never used "special forces" as we know them now. The SS were not commandos as such, and did not operate clandestinly, or teach/work with guerilla soldiers.

It is interesting that the British/French/Australian/Americans all had commandos, the SAS, OSS, SOE etc etc etc, and they cultivated guerilla warfare to aid their cause, but the Nazis didn't use this effective weapon.
We know that the Brits developed commandos because they knew they couldn't face the German army toe to toe in regular combat alone. They needed an edge. Why didn't the Nazis, when they had seen how effective they were.

Not to say the Nazis didn't have daring, commando style raids, but they were soldiers from regular units, trained for the job, then returned to their units once the job was done.

Anybody have any thoughts on the issue of special forces and why the Nazis never used the system.
Firstly, the SOE and the OSS weren't special forces units. They were intelligence agencies created at the start of the war to help set Europe on fire. That phrase does not mean they dropped groups of armed insurgents all over occupied Europe. To understand what these agencies did, read A Man Called Intrepid by W. Stevenson. The Germans did have Special forces. Notably the Brandenburgers, who had exploits on every front. Also, Otto Skorzeny's group of Fallschirmjager, Waffen SS and former petty criminals could be described as a special force. The Brandenburgers were actually an arm of the Abwehr, the German secret service.
February 5th, 2009  
jdodds85
 
well i know that the soe and the oss were forerunners of modern special ops units and comands take the us army special forces for example they decended from the oss.
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February 5th, 2009  
LeEnfield
 
 
The OSS were Spooks and worked out of uniform
February 7th, 2009  
03USMC
 
 
Well yes and no. Jedburg teams operated with the local resistance and acted much like the USASF-ODA's do today. In an advisory role. Thats why Army Special Forces has them included in their lineage. But on the whole alot of OSS operators were intel gathers.
February 7th, 2009  
BritinAfrica
 
 
Despite not being Special Forces, I have nothing but the highest regard for SOE and OSS operatives, operating in enemy territory at risk of being caught, tortured and executed. Extremely brave men and women.

I remember the story of an OSS operator being caught by a German officer while eating a meal in a crowded restaurant. The reason he was caught, he had the American habit of eat with the fork in the right hand. European always use the left hand, with the knife in the right.

Despite intense training, such a simple mistake cost the man his life.
February 7th, 2009  
LeEnfield
 
 
BritinAfrica..........That episode about an American spy using his fork was in a film and there has never been anything about it being in real life
February 7th, 2009  
LeEnfield
 
 
Special Forces was mainly a British Activity. They raided up and down the coasts of Norway, France and North Africa, they also parachuted in teams of SAS men into Germany,Italy, and North Africa with heavily armed jeeps and roamed around the country gathering information and and shooting the place up. If caught they were immediately executed. Then there were the raids on the shipping and other Axis shipping that was carried out in France, Norway, and Malaya. This tied down about 500,000 German troops and Hitler kept about 300.000 German Soldiers in Norway just to stop these raids
February 9th, 2009  
BritinAfrica
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by LeEnfield
BritinAfrica..........That episode about an American spy using his fork was in a film and there has never been anything about it being in real life
Maybe thats where I saw it. Information overload.
February 10th, 2009  
Partisan
 
 
The thread is very long but has no one mentioned Otto Skorzeny? Operation Long Jump and Operation Griffin?

Whilst the Wehrmacht didn't have formed "irregular fighting" units they did create them for specific operations, some accomplished brilliantly.

Apologies if I'm repeating someone else, but Otto does desrve credit, his rescue of Mussolini wasn't a assymetrical warfare, as were the gains made during Op Griffin (The Battle of the Bulge.).