What's the best ways to clear a jammed weapon in combat




 
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December 21st, 2014  
JRotc_cadet
 
 

Topic: What's the best ways to clear a jammed weapon in combat


What is the best way to clear a weapon that has a round in the barrel during combat?

http://youtu.be/mn0KBzK2Kho
December 21st, 2014  
crazytanker
 
 
Uh...... I'm not sure what to say here...are you asking a legit question about how to clear a jammed weapon during combat? Or are you saying having a loaded firearm break in your hands - in combat - is a great solution?
December 21st, 2014  
JRotc_cadet
 
 
I'm asking how you would clear the same type of jam that happens in the video.
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December 21st, 2014  
crazytanker
 
 
It depends on combat conditions. Are you taking fire? Are you hiding behind a concrete barrier with enemies moving around you? The variables around you are going to determine your course of action. If you can quickly and safely remove the jammed round - without exposing yourself to oncoming tangos - great, do it. But if you're in a firefight, removing the jam in the weapon then & there is probably not the best idea. While you're fiddling with the weapon, the enemy is still engaging and your eyes are on the weapon - not your surroundings.

On the flip side, the jam is where the round is not being chambered correctly. This could be from dirt/debris/contaminants on the inside of the rifle, faulty equipment (improper design of the rifle, or the round) etc. Without seeing the actual rifle, it's hard to determine exactly why the rifle jammed, and thusly how to proceed. In general, the M1 was an excellent rifle - I have one that landed on the beaches of Normandy. When you take care of the rifle with proper cleaning and maintenance - even in combat zones- it'll take care of you.
January 17th, 2015  
MikeP
 
 
I carried a CAR 15 in Vn 68-70.

I had a jointed cleaning rod taped to the forearm for just such an occaision.

That is how you do it-whenever, wherever, situation permits or dictates.
March 7th, 2015  
Remington 1858
 
 
Don't get too excited about that video because there are too many unknowns. An M-1 Garand in good condition is a very robust rifle and you are not going to cause a catastrophic failure of the kind shown in the video using normal ammunition, I don't care what you do. Even a bullet or bullets lodged in the barrel wont do that. Reloaded ammo with a double or triple charge of fast burning powder - well, that is a different story.
Normally, military personnel are taught a number of drills to quickly get a malfunctioning weapon back into action. Just what those drills are depends on the weapon in question. If the rifle is fed ammunition from a removable magazine, and most today are, a frequent problem is a magazine not properly seated and locked into place. So most militaries teach that the first thing is to tap the magazine up into place. However, on some weapons this will result in knocking the top round loose and causing a double-feed and further problems. This is true of the Steyr AUG for example. The next step is usually cycling the action to remove the cartridge in the chamber and replace it with another. However, if not done correctly this action can also cause a double-feed, where two cartridge are attempting to enter the chamber at the same time and that will cause a very serious stoppage. On some weapons with small ejection ports, it may require the services of a pocket knife to pry out the two jammed cartridges.
It all depends on the weapon in question. The manual for that particular weapon is the proper guide for malfunction clearing. The procedure is not without danger. i even know of a man killed in performing an "immediate action" clearing procedure. It was an automatic weapon that "ran away" on full auto after he performed the drill. The muzzle of the gun recoiled up and a bullet caught him right under the chin with fatal results.
March 7th, 2015  
tetvet
 
A jam is usually caused by the owner of the rifle , keep your rifle and ammo clean but the quick fix is a cleaning rod shove it down the barrel then hit the end of the cleaning rod against something hard problem solved .
March 7th, 2015  
BritinAfrica
 
 
I heard/read that the problems with the M16 in Vietnam was dirty burning ammunition.
March 7th, 2015  
Queensman
 
 
In basic training and throughout your military career you will constantly train with your rifle and learn the IA, immediate action, drills for when you get a stoppage, this should be second nature and you should be able to remedy the situation rapidly, even in combat, because it's what you have been training for.
Having a round stuck in the barrel is slightly harder to fix and it may be a good idea if you can grab a rifle of a wounded or dead soldier to carry on. Failing that if there are enough of you and your under cover, then crack on and clear the rifle while your mates carry on winning the firefight.
March 8th, 2015  
Remington 1858
 
 
All military rifles go through a teething period where deficiencies are discovered in the crucible of combat and fixes are developed. The M-16 had trouble in Viet Nam because the powder used in the service ammunition was different than the powder used in the acceptance trials. The residue of the powder and the humidity of the region made a nice, sticky mess that caused stoppages. This was coupled with inadequate maintenance procedures and inappropriate lubricants. Chrome plating certain parts were also applied as a fix.All the shortcomings were corrected in time.
There are military rifles in service that are used only by parade - ground armies. If they have combat deficiencies they will not be discovered until the moment of battle.
It is important to point out that he ammunition is a critical component of the weapon system. The best rifle in the world is useless without reliable, accurate, clean-burning ammunition.
Last but not least, the soldier must be trained in the operation and maintenance of the weapon. Simple, rugged, reliable rifles generally fare better than fancy, high-tech gadgets. Example: the AK series.
 


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