What is your favorite WW2 planes? - Page 4




 
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June 23rd, 2011  
AVON
 

Topic: Re: What is your favorite WW2 planes?


While the P-51 is my favorite fighter of the period another fighter that was very productive was the P-38 Lightning. It fought the entire war on in most all theaters of operation. It was far from the best fighter for a turn & burn dogfight but, in slashing attacks it was great. Thus it was not good as a bomber escort but, for "air borne gorilla" warfare it was great. The range to go deep into German & Romania and wreak a lot of havoc.
Like the F-4 Phantom II, the P-38 was designed as an interceptor that was forced into the fighter role.
October 10th, 2011  
BritinAfrica
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by MontyB
Both out dated before WW2 even began.
I agree, the Hurricane was out dated and out performed, but she could take a lot of punishment, it was also the only airframe in the Desert Air Force that could take two 40mm canons, she did a good job as a tank buster.

My all time favourites are the Spitfire MkIX, the Mosquito, and the Lancaster. The P51 is up there too, brilliant aeroplane
October 10th, 2011  
VDKMS
 
C-47 Dakota , the workhorse of the allies. Put boots on the ground during D-Day and Market Garden. Kept the paratroopers fighting in Bastogne while surrounded. Were escorted by the best fighterplanes of the war. Still flying today.
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October 30th, 2011  
papasha408
 
Favorite fighters of WW2 are
Messershmidt 262 Jet
Folke Wolfe 190
Yakovlev 9 and 3
N.A. Mustang P51
Hawker Typhoon
Vought F4U Corsair, Carrier aircraft

Aircraft that almost made my favorite list
Supermarine Spitfire
Mitsubishi A6M 'Zeke' (Zero)
November 1st, 2011  
BritinAfrica
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by VDKMS
C-47 Dakota , the workhorse of the allies. Put boots on the ground during D-Day and Market Garden. Kept the paratroopers fighting in Bastogne while surrounded. Were escorted by the best fighterplanes of the war. Still flying today.
They also supplied the Chindits in Burma along with the Chinese fighting with Stilwell. The South African Air Force (SAAF) still use the aircraft today, albeit with up-rated turbo prop engines. An amazing air-frame.

Its not that long ago the SAAF got rid of it's Harvards (T6 Texans).
November 2nd, 2011  
Spartan613
 
 
The CAC CA-15. A pity it never made it into service. lmost 2000km range on internal fuel.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CAC_CA-15
November 2nd, 2011  
BritinAfrica
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spartan613
The CAC CA-15. A pity it never made it into service. lmost 2000km range on internal fuel.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CAC_CA-15
Interesting aeroplane, as stated it does look a lot like the P51 Mustang. Sadly a lot of aircraft with possibilities didn't make it into production, but with the dawning of the jet age, piston engined fighters were a thing of the past

Talking to an ex navigator on the South African Air Force Avro Shackleton's, the 37 Litre Griffon engines had a nasty habit of blowing spark plugs out of the cylinders. However,talking to ex RAF pilots flying Mk18 Spits, they never had this problem.
November 3rd, 2011  
Spartan613
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by BritinAfrica
Interesting aeroplane, as stated it does look a lot like the P51 Mustang. Sadly a lot of aircraft with possibilities didn't make it into production, but with the dawning of the jet age, piston engined fighters were a thing of the past

Talking to an ex navigator on the South African Air Force Avro Shackleton's, the 37 Litre Griffon engines had a nasty habit of blowing spark plugs out of the cylinders. However,talking to ex RAF pilots flying Mk18 Spits, they never had this problem.
I met a bloke who was a navigator on Shackletons. He described it as "18,000 rivets flying in close formation".
November 3rd, 2011  
BritinAfrica
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spartan613
I met a bloke who was a navigator on Shackletons. He described it as "18,000 rivets flying in close formation".
I've heard that one before and very accurate. A Shackleton was heading for UK from South Africa a few years ago, they topped off the fuel tanks somewhere up north but didn't check the fuel filters, then two of her engines caught fire. She ended up doing a wheels up landing in the Sahara. Thankfully none of the pax or crew were badly hurt. As far as I know, she's still there, unless she's been stripped.

I did notice one difference between RAF Shackleton's station in Seletar Singapore and the SAAF Shacks, the RAF types were tail draggers, while the SAAF were tricycle.
November 3rd, 2011  
LeEnfield
 
 
I was air trooped all over the world in bloody Shackletons, and dam uncomfortable they were.