What enviroment is the toughest to fight/train in? - Page 6




View Poll Results :What enviroment is the toughest to train/fight in
Urban 10 20.41%
Desert 3 6.12%
Woodland 1 2.04%
Artic/Winter 19 38.78%
Mountains 2 4.08%
Plains/ flat land 0 0%
Sea/beaches 0 0%
Jungle 13 26.53%
Other 1 2.04%
Voters: 49. You may not vote on this poll

 
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January 17th, 2005  
EuroSpike
 

Topic: Re: What enviroment is the toughest to fight/train in?


Quote:
Originally Posted by Shadowalker
I was just wonderin from your personal experiences.
Urban is physically tough but arctic and winter are the most uncomfortable but man gets quickly used with them.

The best thing in winter is no mosquitos or other bugs and less sweat and dirt, and the worst thing is taking naps isn't possible because snow and frost and that makes lack of sleep worse.
January 18th, 2005  
Charge 7
 
 
I voted for arctic. Not only because as somebody else already pointed out, the weather can seriously degrade and even break your equipment but because exposure can kill you in minutes. Jungle and desert heat can certainly kill you, but not quite so suddenly. I have winter warfare experience via our Winter Mountain Warfare course here at the Mountaineering School. I wasn't assigned to the cadre but worked as part of an MTT (Mission Training Team) Also worked on the biathalon course for a number of years. I, like Redleg, come from a northern climate and am more used to colder temperatures than many others. It can get as low as -40 here that's both Fahrenheit and Celsius (they meet at that temp). Though the worst I can recall being out in the field at was about -20 F or -28 C.

Some links of interest:

http://www-benning.army.mil/AMWS/
http://www.ausa.org/www/armymag.nsf/...5?OpenDocument
January 18th, 2005  
Chinaman
 
urban definetly, any bullets that hit concrete or bricks could take pieces off it and it would become sharpel, it would have twice the impact
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January 18th, 2005  
A Can of Man
 
 
para, that's actually not as bad as tree burst. Or loose rocks on the ground. Those make deadly shrapnel.
January 18th, 2005  
fusion
 
Hi Guys
How about the highest battelfield in the world , Siachin betwen india Pakistan and China.

http://www.globalsecurity.org/milita...ar/siachen.htm
January 18th, 2005  
Pollux
 
i also voted for winter.
i did my ranger training in the alps during december at -30C and a fierce wind.
the bad is if you move a longer time during marching or running, you begin to sweat...and if you stop moving, you get cold cold...very cold. the water in your canteens or camelbacks freezes. Starting a fire is extreme difificult, with frozen wood.
you even can hardly move your fingers, becaus the snow on your gloves freezes.
a comrades finger had to be taken off, because of frostbites, and it took 2 months til i felt my fingers again.

so in my opinion, the most difficult condition is winter combined with mountains.
January 18th, 2005  
Snauhi
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pollux
i also voted for winter.
i did my ranger training in the alps during december at -30C and a fierce wind.
the bad is if you move a longer time during marching or running, you begin to sweat...and if you stop moving, you get cold cold...very cold. the water in your canteens or camelbacks freezes. Starting a fire is extreme difificult, with frozen wood.
you even can hardly move your fingers, becaus the snow on your gloves freezes.
a comrades finger had to be taken off, because of frostbites, and it took 2 months til i felt my fingers again.

so in my opinion, the most difficult condition is winter combined with mountains.

wow thats bad. Germany need better winter clothing :P
January 18th, 2005  
EuroSpike
 
"the bad is if you move a longer time during marching or running, you begin to sweat...and if you stop moving, you get cold cold...very cold. the water in your canteens or camelbacks freezes. Starting a fire is extreme difificult, with frozen wood. "

Not bad and quite easily solved problems. Wear only lightly while moving: t-shirt, polo-shirt, camojacket, snowsuit and long underpants are enough (i quess they are quite same stuff like ours). That keeps you warm enough and you won't sweat too much. When you stop for longer time for a pause for example, wear parkas or other warm fatique coats and unwear them when the pause ends. And keeping legs warm and dry are very important too. 8)

To prevent water canteen to get frozen, keep it under your clothes. You can hang it from a button hole under your jacket and you get it easily out to get drink. The worst misstake is to keep it in combat belt or even hanging outside without cover from any pouch.


"and if you stop moving, you get cold cold...very cold. the water in your canteens or camelbacks freezes. Starting a fire is extreme difificult, with frozen wood.
you even can hardly move your fingers, becaus the snow on your gloves freezes.
a comrades finger had to be taken off, because of frostbites, and it took 2 months til i felt my fingers again. "


Somehow the most of all military gloves are piece of s*it in winter use. Gloves should warm hands but not prevent to use weapon. I have found common thinsulate leather gloves the best. Costs about 5e from the nearest store.

If gloves don't warm enough, the best way to avoid frostbites is just keeping hands in pockets or under clothes to warm them always when using them is not needed.
January 18th, 2005  
beardo
 
im thinking artic...nothing is as bad as being absolutely freezing and knowing you might have a firefight..and have to move your frozen hands lol

not looking forward to this when i go in:
January 18th, 2005  
Charge 7
 
 
Um, ouch. Brrrrrrrrr!!

Yes, EuroSpike most military gloves suck. I always liked my old trigger mittens, but I imagine they don't issue those anymore. I used black thinsulate lined Goretex ski gloves in my latter days.