In wake of Iraq war, allies prefer China to U.S. - Page 3




 
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In wake of Iraq war, allies prefer China to U.S.
 
June 25th, 2005  
CSmaster
 
In wake of Iraq war, allies prefer China to U.S.
ya, good post, and i still have faith on U.S to make the world a better place despite Bush and the Gitmo b******t


but u got to admit the world is becoming multi-polar,

U.S won't be the only superpower in this century, EU, russia, india, china, brazil are rising and they are saying NO to U.S more often then ever, and U.S has to listen to them often too
June 25th, 2005  
SHERMAN
 
 
This is BS. Every Superpower in the history of mankind spen sometime telling everyone why its better than them. So what? The reasons for hatred towards America are much deeper than people thinking they are arrogant.
June 25th, 2005  
CSmaster
 
by what u mean BS, if u think world is not becoming multi-polar, than wut u say is BS
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In wake of Iraq war, allies prefer China to U.S.
June 25th, 2005  
MontyB
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by DTop

I too have spent time in other parts of the world and I still prefer the U.S. to any of them. Still, I am not about to go around pointing out what I don't like about any of them. Especially not here on these forums.
You're certainly entitled to your opinion but don't equate the U.S. to Nazi Germany. That is stepping over the line Kiwi. I would rather not spend time listening to those who let no opportunity go by to criticize the country I live in. It is getting to be a bit much. It's called country bashing and it is not allowed on these forums. To make it perfectly clear, this is a warning to you to cease such comments.
Problems? PM me.
Yes and oddly enough I prefer New Zealand to every other country I have lived in as well, its only natural for people to share this belief about their own country regardless of where they live.

I have responded to the rest of your post in the PM as requested however I really do think you should read the post a little closer than you obviously have.
June 25th, 2005  
PershingOfLSU
 
You're very wrong about United States food production. Taken from: http://www.fao.org/documents/show_cd...e/J5649e00.htm

The following concerns United States wheat and corn production: Spring wheat planting was completed on an area estimated to be 4 percent up from last year and the crop is reported to be in mostly fair to good condition. The winter wheat harvest is already underway in the southern states while further to the north it is maturing. Winter wheat output is forecast at some 43 million tonnes, 6 percent up from last year as the area harvested should increase after much lower abandonment and in addition, higher yields are expected. Spring wheat output prospects are still uncertain but assuming trend yields and the recent average ratio of planted-to-harvested area, this year’s crop could be down somewhat from 2004 despite the larger area planted. The country’s aggregate wheat output in 2005 is forecast at 58.2 million tonnes, marginally down from 2004. The bulk of the main coarse grain crop in the United States was sown by late May, somewhat ahead of the average date after a very favourable planting season. However, despite the good start to the season and early indications that the area for harvest will be virtually unchanged this year, production of coarse grains is forecast to decrease somewhat because of lower yields expected after very high levels in 2004. Nevertheless, yields could still be above the average of the past five years. As of May, the aggregate output of coarse grains was forecast at 296.6 million tonnes, about 3 percent down from the previous year. Of the total, maize is expected to account for 279 million tonnes.

That's one tonne of wheat and one tonne of corn per person. Not counting legumes, fruits, nuts as well as livestock. Granted, most livestock does not graze and is fed with wheat or corn.

China on the otherhand will be importing grain: Despite the forecast of larger crops for wheat, rice and maize in 2005, China is expected still to face a grain deficit and would continue to be a net grain importer in 2005/06. In addition, China is expected to import more than 22 million tonnes of soybeans in 2005/06 to meet growing domestic demand. Soybeans are defined as a grain in China.

As will South Korea: Cereal import in 2004/05 is estimated at about 13.1 million tonnes (of which nearly 3.9 million tonnes of wheat, 8.8 million tonnes of maize and 226 000 tonnes of rice).

China's food production may have doubled, but consider that before 1980 countless millions starved to death in the failed Great Leap Forward.
June 25th, 2005  
CSmaster
 
my point was,

if suddenly one day U.S and china both stop trade

china will have to abandon vegetable and other parts of argiculture to plant things like rice and wheat,

and americans will have to stop use cars and ride bikes,

i was talking to Rabs, who thinks China cannot be a super-power because it cannot self-sustain its own natural resrouce (which was wrong as CHina produces over half of its own oil and ohter natural resource), but i was trying to point out that nations like Japan, U.S are heavily dependent on oil and other natural resource importing
June 25th, 2005  
PershingOfLSU
 
Once again, you're wrong. The United States only receives 13 thousand barrels of oil a day from China. As found at this link: http://www.eia.doe.gov/neic/rankings/crudebycountry.htm

China is also a large importer of crude oil. Infact the only country that consumes more is the United States: http://www.time.com/time/asia/magazi...725174,00.html

However, the United States would need to find another supplier for many small and easily manufactured items that are none the less important, but we wouldn't be facing starvation.

You are correct though that China is more then capable of becoming a super power. Japan for example, an island with very few resources, would have been able to have ruled the pacific if not for United States intervention.
June 25th, 2005  
CSmaster
 
u misunderstood me again

i am talking about both nation stop trading with the rest of the world (as Mr. Rabs tries to point out, that china will die and U.S will still live well, which was wrong)


U.S mainly imports oil from middle-east, so does china
June 25th, 2005  
queens_ranger
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by PershingOfLSU
You're very wrong about United States food production. Taken from: http://www.fao.org/documents/show_cd...e/J5649e00.htm

The following concerns United States wheat and corn production: Spring wheat planting was completed on an area estimated to be 4 percent up from last year and the crop is reported to be in mostly fair to good condition. The winter wheat harvest is already underway in the southern states while further to the north it is maturing. Winter wheat output is forecast at some 43 million tonnes, 6 percent up from last year as the area harvested should increase after much lower abandonment and in addition, higher yields are expected. Spring wheat output prospects are still uncertain but assuming trend yields and the recent average ratio of planted-to-harvested area, this year’s crop could be down somewhat from 2004 despite the larger area planted. The country’s aggregate wheat output in 2005 is forecast at 58.2 million tonnes, marginally down from 2004. The bulk of the main coarse grain crop in the United States was sown by late May, somewhat ahead of the average date after a very favourable planting season. However, despite the good start to the season and early indications that the area for harvest will be virtually unchanged this year, production of coarse grains is forecast to decrease somewhat because of lower yields expected after very high levels in 2004. Nevertheless, yields could still be above the average of the past five years. As of May, the aggregate output of coarse grains was forecast at 296.6 million tonnes, about 3 percent down from the previous year. Of the total, maize is expected to account for 279 million tonnes.

That's one tonne of wheat and one tonne of corn per person. Not counting legumes, fruits, nuts as well as livestock. Granted, most livestock does not graze and is fed with wheat or corn.

China on the otherhand will be importing grain: Despite the forecast of larger crops for wheat, rice and maize in 2005, China is expected still to face a grain deficit and would continue to be a net grain importer in 2005/06. In addition, China is expected to import more than 22 million tonnes of soybeans in 2005/06 to meet growing domestic demand. Soybeans are defined as a grain in China.

As will South Korea: Cereal import in 2004/05 is estimated at about 13.1 million tonnes (of which nearly 3.9 million tonnes of wheat, 8.8 million tonnes of maize and 226 000 tonnes of rice).

China's food production may have doubled, but consider that before 1980 countless millions starved to death in the failed Great Leap Forward.
check the worldfact book for some facts on both countries' import commodities
June 25th, 2005  
CSmaster
 
no nation can survive without trading (except North korea probably)