USMC and RM




 
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November 14th, 2011  
BritinBritain
 
 

Topic: USMC and RM


I never realised that the USMC and RM were linked. Just goes to show, one is never too old to learn.

As that is the case, both the USMC and the RM can perhaps trace its lineage to the Queens Division and back to 1572.

The story is a bit complicated due to amalgamations of regiments and regiment name changes over the years.

The Queens Division is made up of the Queen's Regiment (which has now since been renamed Princess of Wales's Royal Regiment (Queen's and Royal Hampshire)

The Royal Anglian Regiment

Royal Regiment of Fusiliers.

The Queens regiment had a number of county regiments amalgamated into it such as the

Middlesex Regiment

The Buffs (Royal East Kent Regiment)

Royal Sussex Regiment

The Queen's Royal Surrey Regiment.

The Buffs (Royal East Kent Regiment) The origins of the regiment lay in Thomas Morgan's Company of Foot, The London Trained Bands which was in existence from 1572 to 1648. In 1665 it was known as the 4th (The Holland Maritime) Regiment and by 1668 as the 4th (The Holland) Regiment. In 1688-1689 it was "4th The Lord High Admiral's Regiment" until 1751 it was named as other regiments after the Colonel Commanding being the 3rd (Howard's) Regiment of Foot from 1737-1743 at which point it became the*3rd Regiment of Foot, "Howard's Buffs".

The 3rd Regiment received its nickname of "The Buffs" because it had been issued buff coats—made of soft leather—first when it served abroad in Holland and later when it was a Maritime Regiment of Foot.

Although the term “Marines” is not used, the Buffs were maritime infantry.
November 14th, 2011  
42RM
 
The oldest predecessor to which the Royal Marines can trace a direct lineage was His Majesty´s Marine Forces raised in 1755.

The "first official" unit of "Marines" were originally formed on 28th October 1664 when Charles II sanctioned the formation of a Regiment for Sea Service, to be known as The Duke of York and Albany's Maritime Regiment of Foot, otherwise known as The Admiral’s Regiment.

On 29th April 1802 King George III granted the Marines the style of "Royal". They were granted the distinction of the Crown and Crowned Lion to show that the Marines are a Royal Corps. That was when they became know as "The Royal Marines".
November 14th, 2011  
captiva303
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by 42RM
The oldest predecessor to which the Royal Marines can trace a direct lineage was His Majesty´s Marine Forces raised in 1755.

The "first official" unit of "Marines" were originally formed on 28th October 1664 when Charles II sanctioned the formation of a Regiment for Sea Service, to be known as The Duke of York and Albany's Maritime Regiment of Foot, otherwise known as The Admiral’s Regiment.

On 29th April 1802 King George III granted the Marines the style of "Royal". They were granted the distinction of the Crown and Crowned Lion to show that the Marines are a Royal Corps. That was when they became know as "The Royal Marines".
before the Royal marines got the commando role what was their function?
Especially before world war 2... I have read about the royal marines and how there was apparently resistance amongst the upper ranks of its changed role... but what was its previous job?
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November 14th, 2011  
42RM
 
Before Commandos the Royal Marines carried out all of Britain's amphibious landings; a job they had carried out with distinction for over 275 years.

The Marines also operated as Artillerists and they were Light Infantrymen.
November 14th, 2011  
03USMC
 
 
The first American Marines were raised by Virginia Governor William Gooch and served in Admiral Vernon's fleet in the West Indies in 1739, they were are Regiment of Foot used as Sea Service Infantry and known as Gooch's Marines.
November 16th, 2011  
Alan P
 

Topic: Fourth of Foot


Interesting posts about the marines etc.
The King's Own was the 4th of foot infantry regiment. It later amalgamated with the Border Regt. To become The King's Own Royal Border Regiment of which I was a member.
On our bush hats in Africa, we had an embroidered cloth badge with 1V on it. The regiment has since amalgamated again to be named The Duke of Lancaster's Regiment,
With all these amalgamations Regiments with many battle honours have been lost in the wilderness of defence cuts.
November 16th, 2011  
LeEnfield
 
 
The title Commando come from a Dutch word used for their mobile forces in the Boer War
November 16th, 2011  
BritinBritain
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alan P
Interesting posts about the marines etc.
The King's Own was the 4th of foot infantry regiment. It later amalgamated with the Border Regt. To become The King's Own Royal Border Regiment of which I was a member.
On our bush hats in Africa, we had an embroidered cloth badge with 1V on it. The regiment has since amalgamated again to be named The Duke of Lancaster's Regiment,
With all these amalgamations Regiments with many battle honours have been lost in the wilderness of defence cuts.
Too many famous regimental names have fallen by the wayside and as you stated, battle honours.

While I was a TA member of the Queens Regiment, our company was known as D Company (Diehard) 5 Queens. Originally the company formed part of the Middlesex Regiment (my grandfather also served in the Middlesex during WW1 as a regular soldier)
November 17th, 2011  
LeEnfield
 
 
My Grandmothers Uncle was Robert Ryder VC from WW1 and he was from the Middlesex Regiment
November 17th, 2011  
BritinBritain
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by LeEnfield
My Grandmothers Uncle was Robert Ryder VC from WW1 and he was from the Middlesex Regiment
The Middlesex deserved their nickname "Diehards."